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RAILS!

English Rails

OF THE

BEST MAKERS.

JAMES TINKER,

37 WILLIAM STREET,

NEW YORK.

D

TRUSLOW & GOODRIDGE,

BROKERS IN

NEW AND OLD RAILS,

Fish Bars, Rail Chairs, Spikes,

AND

GENERAL RAILROAD SUPPLIES.

ALSO,

Hot and Cold Pressed Nuts, Bolts and
Washers, Scotch and American Pig
Iron, Scrap Iron and Metals,
24 CLIFF STREET,
P. O. Box 6,797,

New York City.

RAILS.

English & American

RAILS

OF THE

Best Makers.

H. V. & H. W. POOR, 57 BROADWAY,

New York.

VIBBARD, FOOTE & CO.,

40 BROADWAY and 53 NEW ST.,

NEW YORK.

STEEL AND IRON

RAILS,

OF THE

BEST

Foreign and Domestic Manufacture

Dealers in every Description

or

RAILWAY MATERIAL.

PRATT'S

PATENT COMPENSATING FISH-JOINT,

MADE BY

VERREE & MITCHELL,
Iron and Steel Manufacturers,

No. 939 N. Delaware Avenue, Philadelphia,

Combines more Advantages than any Fish-Joint heretofore introduced.

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This Joint is made of two heavy bars of wrought iron, or cast steel, eighteen inches in length, or any other desired length, fitted to the side of the Rail and secured by four three-quarter inch bolts, with four malleable cast-iron cups and washers, and a gum ring two inches in diameter and half an inch thick in each cup.

The value of gum to absorb jarring motion is well known, but when the pressure is as great as that required to secure the ends of Railroad Ralls, some device or method by which to prevent the gum from being forced out from under the washer, when subjected to increased pressure, is indispensable. The Patent Compensating Fish-Joint secures that effect and enables Railroad managers to apply all the force and pressure desired.

Where this Joint is securely fastened by screwing the nut upon the washer and gum in the caps with a lever three feet in length, it makes a perfectly tight joint, and thus secures what Railroad managers have long desired—a continuous Rail, with suficient elasticity in the gum to relieve from and compensate for the sudden jar, and at the same time allow for expansion and contraction by heat or cold.

We claim that this Joint absorbs the vibratory shock given by the wheels in passing over the ends of Rails, thereby preventing fracture; and we have yet to hear of the first Rail having broken with our Joint on it.

We confidently claim for Pratt's Patent Compensating Fish-Joint :

That it makes the best and cheapest form of fastening, requiring no plate or chair underneath the foot of Rail.

That it is safe and secure, and prevents the numerous accidents resulting from loose or broken Rails.

That it requires no slotting or punching of the flanges of the Rails, and thas avoids the great difficulty and danger of the fracture of all-steel Rails at such points.

That it can be applied in repairing and relaying Rails with the least trouble and delay.

That the materials are indestructible, and make a PERFECT AND CONTINUOUS RAIL, thus securing what has long been desired, and what all previous experiments have failed to attain.

The manufacturers can supply these Joints complete in all their parts, ready to be fastened to the ends of the Rails with dispatch.

Reference to all the principal Railroads in the country.

THE

RAILROAD GAZETTE

A Journal of Transportation.

AN ILLUSTRATED QUARTO WEEKLY,

DEVOTED EXCLUSIVELY TO RAILROADS.

Railroad Questions discussed by practical Railroad Men. Illustrated Descriptions of Railroad Invon. tions. Rallroad Engineering and Mechanics. Record of the Progress of Railroads. Railroad Roports and Statistics. General Railroad News. Railroad Elections and Appointmenta. Twenty-four large quarto pages, published every Saturday. Every Railroad Man, and every man interested in Railroads, should bave it. Terms, $3 a year, in advance. Address

A. N. KELLOGG, Publisher,

No. 101 Washington St., Boston,

Por Advertising Railroad Supplies and inventions, it offers inducements unequaled by any other JourDal in America. Below are a few

NOTICES OF THE PRESS. "A model of what a railroad newspaper should be."-Chicago Tribune. “A well-odited paper, showing industry and Intelligence."-American Railway Times. "Makes a very handsome appearance, and is full of valuable matter."-Chicago Evening Post.

“For railroad men and others wishing to keep themselves thoroughly posted on railroad matters, wo know of no better paper."- Madison Daily State Journal.

“The best informed railway newspaper published in the West." + Aurora (IV.) Beacon.

“Has always been one of the best papers of the country for railroad intelligence."-New York Commer. cial and Financial Chronicle.

"The news is very full, the discussions are conducted in good temper and with excellent information To judge by this first number, the conductors of the Gazette know what 'railroading' is, and what a proper weekly journal should be." -New York World.

"One of our most valuable exchanges. * * * * Its columns teom with reliable information of great benefit to railroad men of every section of the United States."- Leavenworth Bulletin.

“Every railroad man reads the Gazette."— Bloomington (M.) Leader.

"It will compare favorably with any similar publication, not only in New York or Boston, but in Lon. don or on the Continent." —Waukeegan (Tu.) Gazeite.

“The best journal of its class in the United States.”—La Crosse Leader.

"A most valuable thing to the engineer and all railway men, the capitalist, travelor, mechanic and general reader."--Brooklyn (N. Y.) Argus.

"Of great interest to railrond men, and almost equally so to those who use railroads."-Marshal (Mich.) Statesman.

"It must prove a valuable paper to stockholders and those interested in railroads."-N, Y. Globe.

A complete repository of railroad news.”-Harrisburg (Pa.) Patriot.

** As a liv , railroad paper, treating on all topics connected with transportation and presenting weekly all the latest railroad news of the country, the Gazette stands without a rival."- American Builder.

" It will henceforth take the first rank among publications of this character, either in this country or elsewhere, and will supply a medium for general railway intelligence anxiously sought aftor by oficials and the general public." --Travelers' Official Railway Guide.

"Is a most excellent railway paper, and we cannot imagine how any one interested a railways can afford to do without it.”- Appleton's Railway Guide.

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