Page images
PDF
EPUB

VR

...

...

[ocr errors]

.

...

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

...

...

...

[ocr errors]

...

...

Page

Remains of the late Rev. R. H.

Froude ...

49

Mr. Goode's Reply to Mr. Perceval's

Answer on Church Rates

153

Occasional Services (Hon. and Rev.

A. Perceval)..

159

Congregational Responses 163, 164

Bans of Marriage Forbidden for

Scandalous Conduct (Rev. W.

Palin)

166

Extract from Nelson's Life of Bp.

Bull

171

Mr. St. John's edition of Milton 171

“ Dominus Deus Noster Papa" 173

(S. R. Maitland) 425

Controversy with Roman Catholics.. 174

Popery and the Scriptures (G. Tuf-

nell)

175

MS. of Georgius Hamartolus 176

Intercourse between the Eastern

Church and the Roman Catholics

of England

286

On Church Rates.--Mr. Perceval in

Reply to Mr. Goode

287

(Mr. Swan)

655

Rating of Tithes

294, 297

Mr. Metcalfe in reply
to Mr. Austen

647
(Mr. Austen)

654
(T. Newcome)... 758

(J. Cox, D. D.) 760

Parochial Assessments

296

General Private-Prayer Union ... 300

Query relating to Extreme Unction, 300

Genuineness of Bishop Taylor's Con.

templations on the State of Man

302, 416

Gloucester Music Meeting

303

St. David's Cathedral

304

Advice of the Bishops to Pope Ju-

lius III. (Rev. S. R. Maitland)... 307

Prohibition of Marriage

312

On the Rev. G. S. Faber's Account

of the Paulicians (J, G. Dowling) 394

On Mr. Faber's Views of Presby-

terian Ordination (J. Clarke Cros-

thwaite)

398

Mr. Goode, in reply to Mr. Per-

ceval

400

On 1 Peter, jii. 19

408

Qo the True Interpretation of Luke,

xxi. 32

409

Intercourse between the Eastern

Churches and the Nonjurors

Protestant Episcopal Church in

Paris, for celebrating the Worship

of the Church of England in the

French Language...

. 416, 676

Omission of the Prayer for “ Christ's

Church Militaut,” &c 418, 769

Tithes

419

Sale of Church Property under Muni-

cipal Bill

419

Page

See of St. David's in the Twelfth

Century

422

Grassington in Craven

424

Charity-Sermon Placards...

426

Life of Bishop Frampton...

427

On Tradition

514, 670

Extempore Prayer

524

On the Tenth and Eleventh Chapters

of Genesis (W. B. Winning) 528

Parents not to be Sponsors

530

Stopping up Foot-paths through

Churchyards

Waldenses in England (S. R. Mait-

land)

531

Mr. Faber on Presbyterian Ordina-

tion and the Paulicians...

532

History of the Waldenses 538, 753

Presbyterian Baptism

545, 782

The term Altar and Church-Homage, 545

Week-day Prayers and Lectures 548

On the Church-of-England View of

the Church of Rome

530

An Offer of Assistance

551

Mr Crosthwaite's reply to Mr. Faber

on Presbyterian Ordination... 633

Mr. Faber's Postscript on the Pauli-

cians

642

Mr. Dowling's reply to Mr. Faber

on the Paulicians

645

On the Title “Mother of God" 678

Bishop Wilson's Memoranda

689

The Jesuits - Constitutiones Socie-

tatis Jesu

681

Central Society of Education-Mr.

Liardet on Dr. Spry's Letter to

Mr. Duppa

685

The Secretary of the Home De-

partment's Questions

688

On 1 Timothy, vi. 13

689

Exposition of the Sunday Wake 690

On the Meaning of the Term “ Com-

mon Law"

761

On Sir Charles Wolseley's Account

of Popish Bibles (W. R. Bedford) 762

On National Education

764

Mr. Davison's and Bp. Butler's MSS. 768

On Reading the Prayer for the Church

Militant, &c.

. 770

On Marriages in Chapels...

772

On the Variations in the Order for

the Administration of the Holy

Communion ...

774

On the Rubric of the Communion

Service

778

Presbyterian Mode of Administering

the Communion

779

On Primitive Episcopacy and Ordi-

nation (H. Coddington)

782

Ecclesiastical Vestments

On the Ornaments of “ the Ministers"

of the Church

784

On Preaching in Gowns

785

The Office of a Deacon

786

...

[ocr errors]

...

[ocr errors]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small]
[blocks in formation]
[ocr errors]

Page

Churching after Illegitimate Children 788
On the Absolution

788
On Extreme Unction

788
On the Meaning of TENEA-Matt.
xxiv. 34 ...

790
Tenth and Eleventh Chapters of
Genesis ...

792
On Dissenting Churchwardens 792
On the Tendency of some Modern
Views to Heresy

794

On Reprinting Standard Works on

Divinity ...

796

Bidding Prayer... ...

797
Wilkinson's Egypt

797
The Importance and Mode of Circu.
lating Tracts...

799

Appendix to the Paper on Confirma-

tion ...

801

...

...

[ocr errors]

...

...

...

...

[ocr errors]

201

Pluralities-Durham Petition... 80

Cathedrals-Durbam Petition

80

Church Leases— Durham Petition... 81

Patronage of St. Paul's - Petition

of Dr. Birch

81

Address of the Native Converts,

Alumni of Bishops College, to the

Rev. Dr. Mill

83

Right of Appeal against Church

Commissioners

86

Election of Churchwardens

86

Right of Way from the Vicarage to

the Church

87

List of Documents relating to Eccle-

siastical Affairs contained in this

Magazine since its Commencement 87

Bill for Declaring the Law of As-

sessment with Regard to the new

Rent-Charges for Tithe under the

Commutation Act...

196

Substitution of Affirmation for Oaths

Bill...

197

Petition of the Clergy of the Diocese

of Canterbury against Mr. Shaw

Lefevre's Bill...

198

Petition of the Dean and Chapter of

Ely against the Pluralities Bill ... 200

Ecclesiastical Commission.- Address

of the Clergy of the Archdeaconry

of Stafford

British Idolatry in India

201

Irish Tithes

202

Petition of Irish Clergy, in reference

to the proposed Bill affecting

Church Property in Ireland ... 204

Dr. Lamb and Archbishop Whitgift 207

Oaths Validity Bill ...

327

Benefices Pluralities' Bill... 327, 3:29

Exeter Petition- Tithe Commutation 331

Petition of Clergy in the Archdea-

conry of Salop— Mr. Lefevre's Bill, 3:32

Commutation of Tithe

333

Petition against the Board of Guar-

dians of the Caxton and Arrington

Union

334

Dissenters' Marriages

335

The Church in Canada

336

An Address from the Committee of

the Lay Union for the Defence of

the Established Church, on the

subject of the Education of the

Poor

338

Education in the Manufacturing Dis-

tricts

341

National Education

345

An Act to Abridge the holding of

Benefices in Plurality, and to make

better Provision for the Residence

of the Clergy...

445, 581, 815

Tithe Commission

461

Notices of Marriage under the New

Act ...

500

University of London

832

[ocr errors]

...

...

...

...

...

75
Church Rcform
(E. Churton)... 78

[merged small][ocr errors]

...

...

...

[blocks in formation]

THE

BRITISH MAGAZINE,

JULY 1, 1838.

ORIGINAL PAPERS.

THE SOURCES OF ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY.-No. II.

The second class of the sources of ecclesiastical history differs in its very nature from that which has been already noticed. The one consists of testimony, the other of actual facts. Both indeed are equally indispensable. Without the aid of private testimony, documents and monuments would often be unintelligible; and without these public sources of history, we should want what is sometimes absolutely necessary to confirm the information communicated by individual writers. In assigning a high rank to the class which we are now to review, I do not intend to detract from the value which properly belongs to the one to which in my last paper I called the attention of your readers. It must be confessed, however, that the testimony of individuals, who usually feel a deep interest of some kind or other in the transactions which they relate, is likely to be affected by the prejudices and passions of the witnesses. Whereas when we have before us a genuine document or monument, we have an undoubted fact. The information which it communicates may not perhaps be great, but, as far as it goes, it must be true. It places us, with respect to the subject to which it refers, in the situation of contemporaries. And thus these remains of antiquity not only appeal to our senses, and give a substance and reality to the past, but themselves afford the purest and most satisfactory materials of history.

II. The public sources of church-history are naturally divided into documents and monuments-i. e., official writings and works of art.

The former of these divisions-namely, documents,—will afford a subject sufficiently extensive for the present paper.

1. The relation in which the church has stood to the state has led from time to time to the production of an important kind of information in the successive enactments of political legislation. For three centuries the government of the Roman empire maintained a fierce conflict with the gospel, and the edicts of the Cæsars rarely spoke to Vol. XIV.-July, 1838.

B

their Christian subjects any other language than that of threatening and denunciation. When Constantine submitted to the power of the cross, and began the long succession of Christian princes, a different state of things arose, and we trace in the civil law* the public establishment of Christianity on the ruins of paganism. As the supremacy of Rome was overthrown, and new kingdoms arose in the Western world, the laws of the several states continue to illustrate ecclesiastical history. And not merely the statutes of the Christian nations, but their customs and usages throw light upon the condition and constitution of the church. But the jealousy of rival professions, the interests of conflicting jurisdictions, and the opinions of contending sects, have introduced embarrassment and uncertainty into some of the most interesting subjects connected with this branch of ecclesiastical antiquities; and candour and acuteness are not less requisite than legal and historical learning, for the successful study of this department of the sources of church-history.

2. From a very early period we find the church in the possession of real property; and after the divine authority of Christianity had been recognised by the state, princes, cities, and wealthy individuals, vied with each other in the magnificence of their liberality towards the favoured members of the spiritual estate. The legal instrumentst which conveyed the munificence of founders and benefactors, and marked the conditions on which they extended their bounty, reflect much light on the external and internal history of the church. The grants, statutes, charters, and documents of every kind connected with endowments, deserve the attentive examination of the ecclesiastical student. They illustrate in a very interesting manner the opinions and feelings prevalent in society on religious subjects, and often explain and communicate important facts. But they must be studied cautiously. Ambitious individuals and selfish communities have sometimes not scrupled to aggrandize themselves or their orders by the base arts of fabrication and corruption. The student of muniments needs an extensive acquaintance with diplomatic, and a sagacious critical sense. And if he be not in a high degree unprejudiced and impartial, he will inevitably be the victim of credulity or scepticism.

3. The governors of the churches assembled in council form the venerable senate of the Christian commonwealth ; and the proceedings of the chief pastors of the church publicly convened for solemn deliberation command the respectful attention of the historical student. I am not concerned with the authority of these assemblies in a theological point of view, nor called upon to express an opinion how far we are bound to acquiesce in their decisions. But it is at once evident that, historically regarded, the councilst are of the utmost importance. The opinions expressed in the debates of which an account has been

* The Theodosian code, and the later portions of the civil law, exhibit in a compact form the legislation of the empire.

+ Immense stores of documents of this kind have been published in various collections, such as those of D'Achery, Martene, Baluze, and Ludewig.

The following will, I hope, be found a correct list of the editions of the

« PreviousContinue »