Senate Documents, Otherwise Publ. as Public Documents and Executive Documents: 14th Congress, 1st Session-48th Congress, 2nd Session and Special Session, Volume 1

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Page 118 - York" and by that name they and their successors shall and may have continual succession, and shall be persons in law, capable of suing and being sued, pleading and being impleaded, answering and being answered unto, defending and being defended, in all courts and places whatsoever, in all manner of actions, suits, complaints, matters and causes whatsoever; and that they and their successors may have a common seal, and may change and alter the same at their pleasure; and also that they and their...
Page 7 - September last, shall be disposed of for the common benefit of the United States, and be settled and formed into distinct republican States, which shall become members of the Federal Union, and have the same rights of sovereignty, freedom, and independence, as the other States...
Page 6 - Resolved, That copies of the several papers referred to the committee be transmitted, with a copy of the report, to the legislatures of the several States, and that it be earnestly recommended to those States who have claims to the Western country to pass such laws and give their delegates in Congress such powers as may effectually remove the only obstacle to a final ratification of the Articles of Confederation, and that the legislature of Maryland be earnestly requested to authorize their delegates...
Page 95 - Philadelphia, be, and shall be, for ever hereafter, persons able and capable in law, to sue and be sued, plead and be impleaded, answer and be answered unto, defend and be defended...
Page 9 - That the following articles shall be considered as articles of compact between the original states, and the people and states, in the said territory, and forever remain unalterable, unless by common consent, to wit: ARTICLE I.
Page 5 - Paris, if wrested from the common enemy by the blood and treasure of the thirteen states, should be considered as a common property, subject to be parcelled out by Congress into free, convenient and independent governments, in such manner and at such times as the wisdom of that assembly shall hereafter direct.
Page 13 - Resolved, That our Senators in Congress be instructed, and our Representatives be requested to use all...
Page 7 - Army, shall be considered as a common fund for the use and benefit of such of the United States as have become, or shall become members of the confederation...
Page 152 - ... his her or their private or natural capacity or capacities; and shall be assignable and negotiable in like manner as if they were so issued by such private person or persons; that is to say those which shall be payable to any person or persons his her or their order shall be assignable by endorsement in like manner and with the like effect as foreign bills of exchange now are and those which are payable to bearer shall be negotiable and assignable by delivery only.
Page 9 - That the people inhabiting said territory do agree and declare that they forever disclaim all right and title to the unappropriated public lands lying within said territory, and that the same shall be and remain at the sole and entire disposition of the United States...

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