Re/collecting Early Asian America: Essays in Cultural History

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Josephine D. Lee, Imogene L. Lim, Yuko Matsukawa
Temple University Press, 2002 - Asian American arts - 368 pages

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Re/collecting Early Asian America: Essays in Cultural History (Asian American History and Culture)

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This well-documented compilation of 20 essays, mostly by established scholars in their respective fields, discusses the history, literature, memories, and anthropology of Asians in the Americas. "Part ... Read full review

Re/collecting Early Asian America: Essays in Cultural History (Asian American History and Culture)

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

This well-documented compilation of 20 essays, mostly by established scholars in their respective fields, discusses the history, literature, memories, and anthropology of Asians in the Americas. "Part ... Read full review

Contents

III
1
IV
15
V
31
VI
54
VII
78
VIII
94
IX
111
X
127
XV
200
XVI
218
XVIII
238
XIX
255
XX
273
XXI
288
XXIII
307
XXIV
326

XI
143
XII
159
XIII
174
XIV
187
XXVI
340
XXVII
355
XXVIII
357
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Page 231 - All moveables of wonder, from all parts, Are here — Albinos, painted Indians, Dwarfs, The Horse of knowledge, and the learned Pig, The Stone-eater, the man that swallows fire, Giants, Ventriloquists, the Invisible Girl, The Bust that speaks and moves its goggling eyes, The Wax-work, Clock-work, all the marvellous craft Of modern Merlins, Wild Beasts, Puppet-shows, All out-o'-the-way, far-fetched, perverted things, All freaks of nature, all Promethean thoughts Of man, his dulness, madness, and their...
Page 161 - States to promote a better understanding of the United States in other countries, and to increase mutual understanding between the people of the United States and the people of other countries.
Page 61 - I tried to break the spell — the heavy, mute spell of the wilderness — that seemed to draw him to its pitiless breast by the awakening of forgotten and brutal instincts, by the memory of gratified and monstrous passions.
Page 267 - In their traditional exhibitionist role women are simultaneously looked at and displayed, with their appearance coded for strong visual and erotic impact so that they can be said to connote to-be-looked-at-ness.
Page 56 - Chinatown than are dreamed of in Heaven and earth. In reality, there are three parts of Chinatown — the part the guides show you, the part the guides don't show you, and the part that no one ever hears of. It is with the latter part that this story has to do. There are a good many stories that might be written about this third circle of Chinatown, but believe me, they never will be written — at any rate not until the "town...
Page 82 - We hold ourselves bound to the natives of our Indian territories by the same obligations of duty which bind us to all our other subjects ; and those obligations, by the blessing of Almighty God, we shall faithfully and conscientiously fulfil.
Page 112 - It will be the duty of the commander of the forces of occupation to announce and proclaim in the most public manner that we come not as invaders or conquerors, but as friends, to protect the natives in their homes, in their employments, and in their personal and religious rights.
Page 262 - I meet a half Chinese, half white girl. Her face is plastered with a thick white coat of paint and her eyelids and eyebrows are blackened so that the shape of her eyes and the whole expression of her face is changed. She was born in the East, and at the age of eighteen came West in answer to an advertisement. Living for many years among the working class, she had heard little but abuse of the Chinese. It is not difficult, in a land like California, for a half Chinese, half white girl to pass as one...
Page 267 - The representation of woman as image (spectacle, object to be looked at, vision of beauty — and the concurrent representation of the female body as the locus of sexuality, site of visual pleasure, or lure of the gaze...

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