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-OF-

VERMONT.

BY LA FAYETTE WILBUR,

OF JERICHO, VT.

VOLUME III.

"Great things thro' greatest hazards, are achieved,
And then they shine."

JERICHO, VT.

ROSCOE PRINTING HOUSE.

1902.

PUBLIC LIBRARY
252291

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'Twas blow for blow, disputing inch by inch, For one would not retreat nor t'other flinch.-- Byron.

Now no more the drum
Provokes to arms, or trumpet's clangour shrill
Affrights the wives, or chills the virgin's blood:
But joy and pleasure open to the view
Uninterrupted -- Philips

PREFAGE.

In continuing the Early History of Vermont in this third volume, we pass for a time from the consideration of war and from the troublesome scenes of Vermont's early settlers, and the struggles incident to pioneer life, to the consideration of the arts of peace. When the controversy of New York had ceased and an amicable adjustment of the subjects of contention, that have been so fully portrayed in the preceding volumes, had been reached, the leading minds of the State at once began to inquire what should be done to advance the interests of the young and growing State, that it might take a position of influence among the Federal States of the Union, and that her people might keep pace with the advancing state of civilization. The leading men of Vermont during the time of the struggle for an independent position, showed they were persons of courage and ability with practical experience, and equal to any men of the nation in managing the affairs of the State and fostering her material interests. Vermont being an inland State, the attention of her citizens were turned to the subject of increasing facilities of communication in the State, and the improvement of her water-ways, not only within the State, but to establish facilities of communication with other States and foreign nations. These

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