The Constitution of Man Considered in Relation to External Objects

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William D. Ticknor, corner of Washington and School Streets, 1835 - Human beings - 412 pages

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Page 363 - He that believeth on the Son of God hath the witness in himself: he that believeth not God hath made him a liar; because he believeth not the record that God gave of his Son.
Page 355 - For the love of Christ constraineth us, because we thus judge, that if one died for all, then were all dead; And that he died for all, that they which live should not henceforth live unto themselves, but unto him which died for them and rose again.
Page 376 - If thou sinnest, what doest thou against him? Or if thy transgressions be multiplied, what doest thou unto him? If thou be righteous, what givest thou him ? Or what receiveth he of thine hand? Thy wickedness may hurt a man as thou art; And thy righteousness may profit the son of man.
Page 371 - For I know that in me (that is, in my flesh) dwelleth no good thing: for to will is present with me; but how to perform that which is good I find not.
Page 376 - So likewise ye, when ye shall have done all those things which are commanded you, say, We are unprofitable servants : we have done that which was our duty to do.
Page 282 - I know not that we have any one kind or degree of enjoyment, but by the means of our own actions. And by prudence and. care we may, for the most part, pass our days in tolerable ease and quiet ; or, on the contrary, we may, by rashness, ungoverned passion, willfulness, or even by negligence, make ourselves as miserable as ever we please.
Page 370 - Can the Ethiopian change his skin, or the leopard his spots ? then may ye also do good, that are accustomed to do evil.
Page 356 - Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth. And the fear of you, and the dread of you, shall be upon every beast of the earth, and upon every fowl of the air...
Page 371 - For the good that I would, I do not: but the evil which I would not, that I do.
Page 42 - Somewhat further must be brought in to give us an adequate notion of it; namely, that one of those principles of action, conscience or reflection, compared with the rest as they all stand together in the nature of man, plainly bears upon it marks of authority over all the rest, and claims the absolute direction of them all, to allow or forbid their gratification: a disapprobation of reflection being in itself a principle manifestly superior to a mere propension.

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