A Manual for the Use of the General Court

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Contains rules of both branches of the General Court, the constitution of the commonwealth and that of the United States, lists of executive, legislative and judicial departments of the state, etc.

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Page 34 - ... no subject shall be arrested, imprisoned, despoiled, or deprived of his property, immunities, or privileges, put out of the protection of the law, exiled, or deprived of his life, liberty, or estate; but by the judgment of his peers, or the law of the land.
Page 31 - And no subject shall be hurt, molested, or restrained, in his person, liberty, or estate, for worshipping GOD in the manner and season most agreeable to the dictates of his own conscience; or for his religious profession or sentiments; provided he doth not disturb the public peace, or obstruct others in their religious worship.
Page 50 - ... to take and surprise, by all ways and means whatsoever, all and every such person or persons, with their ships, arms, ammunition and other goods, as shall, in a hostile manner, invade or attempt the invading, conquering, or annoying this Commonwealth...
Page 38 - But if he have any objection to the passing of such bill or resolve, he shall return the same, together with his objections thereto, in writing, to the Senate or House of Representatives, in whichsoever the same shall have originated ; who shall enter the objections, sent down by the Governor, at large, on their records, and proceed to reconsider the said bill or resolve.
Page 19 - Delaware, December 7, 1787. Pennsylvania, December 12, 1787. New Jersey, December 18, 1787. Georgia, January 2, 1788. Connecticut, January 9, 1788. Massachusetts, February 6, 1788. Maryland, April 28, 1788. South Carolina. May 23, 1788. New Hampshire, June 21, 1788.
Page 63 - I do solemnly swear that I will administer justice without respect to persons, and do equal right to the poor and to the rich; and that I will faithfully and impartially discharge all the duties incumbent on me as , according to the best of my abilities and understanding agreeably to the Constitution and laws of the United States.
Page 33 - Each individual of the society has a right to be protected by it in the enjoyment of his life, liberty and property, according to standing laws.
Page 50 - Governor shall not, at any time hereafter, by virtue of any power by this Constitution granted, or hereafter to be granted to him by the legislature, transport any of the inhabitants of this Commonwealth, or oblige them to march out of the limits of the same, without their free and voluntary consent, or the consent of the General Court...
Page 5 - SECT. 4. The times, places and manner of holding elections for senators and representatives, shall be prescribed in each state by the legislature thereof ; but the congress may at any time by law make or alter such regulations, except as to the places of choosing senators.
Page 88 - Senator, and the person who receives a majority of all the votes of the joint assembly, a majority of all the members elected to both houses being present and voting, shall be declared duly elected. If no person receives such majority on the first day, the joint assembly shall meet at twelve o'clock meridian of each succeeding day during the session of the legislature, and shall take at least one vote, until a Senator is elected.

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