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Page 71 - English interest was settled with as solid a stability as any thing in human affairs can look for. All the penal laws of that unparalleled code of oppression, which were made after the last event, were manifestly the effects of national hatred and scorn towards a conquered people ; whom the...
Page 59 - Out of every corner of the woods and glens they came creeping forth upon their hands, for their legs could not bear them; they looked like anatomies of death ; they spake like ghosts crying out of their graves...
Page 58 - This, then, I note as a great defect in the civil policy of this kingdom, in that, for the space of 350 years at least after the conquest first attempted, the English laws were not communicated to the Irish, nor the benefit and protection thereof allowed unto them, though they earnestly desired and sought the same.
Page 59 - ... after, insomuch as the very carcasses they spared not to scrape out of their graves ; and if they found a plot of watercresses or shamrocks, there they flocked as to a feast for the time, yet not able long to continue there withal; that in short space there were none almost left, and a most populous and plentiful country suddenly left void of man and beast...
Page 58 - ... years at least after the conquest first attempted, the English laws were not communicated to the Irish, nor the. benefit and protection thereof allowed unto them, though they earnestly desired and sought the same.
Page 87 - Colonies, limiting the supply to their own consumption ; but even this measure was negatived upon a division. Towards the close of that year, the events of the war in North America, and the state of things in Ireland, produced a different feeling in the British Parliament. State necessity, acting under a sense of political danger, yielded, without grace, that which good .sense and good feeling had before recommended in vain...
Page 73 - Cromwell and his powerful army after several years, with such bloodshed and rigour that, in the opinion of lord Clarendon, the sufferings of that nation, from the outset of the rebellion to its close, have never been surpassed but by those of the Jews in their destruction by Titus.
Page 76 - England in reducing the rebels of 1688, and the sale introduced into Ireland a new set of adventurers. It is a very curious and important speculation to look back to the forfeitures of Ireland incurred in the last century. The superficial contents of the island are calculated at 11,042,682 acres.
Page 93 - ... means of relief are not in our power, what is the remedy that reason and policy point out ? It is to identify them with us ; it is to make them a part of the same community, by giving them a full share of those accumulated blessings which are diffused throughout Great Britain ; it is, in a word, by giving them a full participation of the wealth, the power, and the stability of the British empire.
Page 92 - I hope I feel, as becomes a true Irishman, for the dignity and independence of my country, and therefore I would elevate her to her proper station in the rank of civilised nations.

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