Forms of Nationhood: The Elizabethan Writing of England

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University of Chicago Press, 1992 - Literary Criticism - 367 pages
What have poems and maps, law books and plays, ecclesiastical polemics and narratives of overseas exploration to do with one another? By most accounts, very little. They belong to different genres and have been appropriated by scholars in different disciplines. But, as Richard Helgerson shows in this ambitious and wide-ranging study, all were part of an extraordinary sixteenth- and seventeenth-century enterprise: the project of making England.

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Forms of nationhood: the Elizabethan writing of England

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Prompted by Edmund Spenser's question, "Why a God's name, may not we, as else the Greeks, have the kingdom of our own language?'', literary historian Helgerson views 16th-century England as a kingdom ... Read full review

Contents

III
1
IV
19
V
25
VI
40
VII
59
VIII
63
X
73
XI
78
XXII
163
XXIII
171
XXIV
181
XXV
187
XXVI
193
XXVII
204
XXVIII
215
XXIX
228

XII
88
XIII
101
XIV
105
XV
108
XVI
125
XVII
131
XVIII
139
XIX
146
XX
149
XXI
155
XXX
240
XXXI
247
XXXII
254
XXXIII
269
XXXIV
283
XXXV
295
XXXVI
303
XXXVII
351
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