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good, and he will retrieve wounded game as well as, or perhaps better, than any other kind.

The Cross of the Pointer and Terrier is not so much used, but it is strongly advocated by that excellent sportsman, Mr. Colquhoun, and on that account it is worth a trial. A strong, useful frame, with great hardiness of constitution, is the result, capable of bearing cold and wet as long as any other dog. A specimen is represented as one of the group of retrievers opposite this page.

The Little Terrier and Beagle Cross, which is seen in the background of this group, is a yreat favourite with me, and I have never seen any kind of dog perform more extraordinary feats in retrieving than this. The drawback is that he is too small to carry a hare, but for all other purposes he is invaluable. The best cross is about three parts rough terrier to one of the beagle. The terrier may be either the Dandie Dinmont or the Scotch dog; but in selecting one he should possess a good nose, and should have been used for hunting game.

WATER RETRIEVERS. Besides the Newfoundland and its cross with the setter or spaniel, there are also two or three breeds of

pure

water spaniels used in wild-fowl shooting. The form of the Newfoundland cross does not differ from the land retriever of that breed, as represented in the last engraving.

The Old English Water Spaniel is a large, rough, and curlyhaired dog, generally of a liver colour, with or without a little white about the legs and breast. The head is narrow and long; ears of the average length in the spaniel; body strong, especially in the loins; limbs large and bony; feet spreading, and therefore said to be web-footed; tail covered thickly with short hair, without any brush, and ending in a point; Coat curly, and not liable to get wet to the skin, from possessing an oiliness at its roots, which is very essential to the power of resisting the action of water. swims and dives well, but he requires a vast deal of breaking to render him sufficiently obedient. He is represented in the illustration on the left-hand side.

Of the Irish Water Spaniel there are two kinds; the North

This dog

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the deer-hound is judged of a good deal by the coat, which should be very wiry and somewhat long, without being woolly. In colour these dogs are fawn, red, black, or brindled, and often of a greyish shade, composed of a mixture of bluish black and white hairs. A cross of the foxhound with either the smooth or rough greyhound is now very often substituted for the old deer-hound, which is every year becoming more and more scarce. The object is to obtain a fine nose, so as to hunt a cold scent, if necessary, but united with such speed as to be able to keep the stag in view when once the dog has been sighted. High courage must also be combined; but there is an objection to the use of the bulldog in breeding these dogs, because the tendency of the former is to go to the head, where the horns are dangerous weapons. Hence, though nothing gives such an utter disregard of these horns, the cross with the most courageous of dogs is obliged to be abandoned.

The entering of the deer-hound is a very simple process, requiring merely the example of an older companion, and plenty of practice.

THE LAND RETRIEVER.

In the group which accompanies this article three kinds of retrievers are drawn with great accuracy.

1st. The cross between the small Newfoundland and the setter, which is almost always black. 2nd. That between the pointer and rough terrier, the use of which is advocated by Mr. Colquhoun. And 3rd. The small retriever, which is sometimes used in partridge shooting, and is the result of a cross between the beagle and terrier.

The large black Retriever is intermediate in form between the Newfoundland and the setter. The body is lighter and less unwieldy than the former, but more massive than most of our setters. Head heavier than the setter's, with shorter ears, and less vivacity of expression about the eyes. Indeed, in every point he may be described as partaking of both sides of his parentage, so much so that he readily takes the water, like the Newfoundland, and may easily be taught to stand and back like the setter. The nose of this dog is often very

[graphic]

RETRIEVERS.

good, and he will retrieve wounded game as well as, or perhaps better, than any other kind.

The Cross of the Pointer and Terrier is not so much used, but it is strongly advocated by that excellent sportsman, Mr. Colquhoun, and on that account it is worth a trial. A strong, useful frame, with great hardiness of constitution, is the result, capable of bearing cold and wet as long as any other dog. A specimen is represented as one of the group of retrievers opposite this page.

The Little Terrier and Beagle Cross, which is seen in the background of this

group, is a great favourite with me, and I have never seen any kind of dog perform more extraordinary feats in retrieving than this. The drawback is that he is too small to carry a hare, but for all other purposes he is invaluable. The best cross is about three parts rough terrier to one of the beagle. The terrier may be either the Dandie Dinmont or the Scotch dog; but in selecting one he should possess a good nose, and should have been used for hunting game.

WATER RETRIEVERS.

Besides the Newfoundland and its cross with the setter or spaniel, there are also two or three breeds of pure

water spaniels used in wild-fowl shooting. The form of the Newfoundland cross does not differ from the land retriever of that breed, as represented in the last engraving.

The Old English Water Spaniel is a large, rough, and curlyhaired dog, generally of a liver colour, with or without a little white about the legs and breast. The head is narrow and long; ears of the average length in the spaniel; body strong, especially in the loins; limbs large and bony; feet spreading, and therefore said to be web-footed; tail covered thickly with short hair, without any brush, and ending in a point; Coat curly, and not liable to get wet to the skin, from possessing an oiliness at its roots, which is very essential to the power of resisting the action of water. This dog swims and dives well, but he requires a vast deal of breaking to render him sufficiently obedient. He is represented in the illustration on the left-hand side. Of the Irish Water Spaniel there are two kinds; the North

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