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V

PREFACE.

CONTENTS

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PAGE

PAGE

CANTO IV.

310 THE VISIONS OF BELLAY

538

316

THE VISIONS OF PETRARCH .

VI.

322

541

VII.

327 DAPHNAÏDA

542

VIII.

332

IX.

337 COLIN CLOUTS COME HOME AGAIN

549

343

ASTROPHEL

559

XI.

347

XII.

354 THE DOLEFULL LAY OF CLORINDA 562

THE SIXTE BOOKE OF THE FAERIE THE MOURNING MUSE OF THESTYLIS 563

QUEENE, CONTAYNING THE LEGEND OF

A PASTORAL AEGLOGUE ON THE

SIR CALIDORE, OR OF COURTESIE

360

DEATH OF SIR PHILIP SIDNEY,

CANTO I. .

361 KNIGHT, ETC.

566

366
III.

371 AN ELEGIE, OR FRIENDS PASSION,

IV.

377

FOR HIS ASTROPHEL

568

381

VI.

386 AN

EPITAPH UPON THE RIGHT

VII.

391 HONOURABLE SIR PHILIP SIDNEY,

VIII.

396

KNIGHT

570

IX.

402

X.

407 ANOTHER OF THE SAME.

571

XI.

412

XII.

AMORETTI AND EPITHALAMION

572

TWO CANTOS OF MUTABILITIE: WHICH,

EPIGRAMS

586

BOTH FOR FORME AND MATTER, APPEARE TO

EPITHALAMION

587

BE PARCELL OF SOME FOLLOWING BOOKE OF

FOWRE HYMNES.

592

THE FAERIE QUEENE, UNDER THE LEGEND

OF CONSTANCIE

AN HYMNE IN HONOUR OF LOVE

423

592

CANTO VI.

423 AN HYMNE IN HONOUR OF BEAUTIE 596

VII.

429

AN HYMNE OF HEAVENLY LOVE. 599

VIII.

436

AN HYMNE OF HEAVENLY BEAUTIE. 602

TO HIS BOOKE

440

PROTHALAMION, OR A SPOUSALL VERSE . 605

THE SHEPHEARDS CALENDER

446

SONNETS

607

THE RUINES OF TIME

489

A VIEW OF THE PRESENT STATE OF

THE TEARES OF THE MUSES

497

IRELAND, DISCOURSED RY WAY OF A DIA-

VIRGIL'S GNAT

504

LOGUE BETWEENE EUDOXUS AND IREN ÆUS 609

PROSOPOPOIA; OR MOTHER HUBBERDS

APPENDIX I.-VARIATIONS FROM THE

TALE

512

ORIGINAL EDITIONS

685

THE RUINES OF ROME

526

APPENDIX II.-LETTERS FROM SPEN.

MUIOPOTMOS; OR THE FATE OF THE BUT- SER (IMMERITO) TO GABRIEL HAR-

TERFLIE

532 VEY

706

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A GENTLE Knight was pricking on the plaine 11 DARKE is the day, when Phæbus face is

A gentle shepheard borne in Arcady

559 shrowded

572

A harder lesson to learne Continence

106 Dayly when do I seeke and sew for peace

574

A shepheards boye, (no better doe him call,) 446 Diggon Davie! I bidde her godday .

473

After long stormes and tempests over-blowne. 306 Doe I not see that fayrest ymages

580

| After long stormes and tempest sad assay 582

After so long a race as I have run .

585

Ah! Colin, whether on the lowly plaine. 572 FAIRE Proud! now tell me, why should faire

Ah for pittie! wil rancke Winter's rage 448 be proud ?

577

Ah! whither doost thou now, thou greater

Fayre bosom! fraught with vertues richest

Muse

429

tresure.

584

Ah! whither Love! wilt thou now carrie

Fayre cruell! why are ye so fierce and cruell? 580

mee?

596 Fayre eyes! the myrrour of my mazed hart 573

Ah! why hath nature to so hard a hart.

577 Fayre is my love, with her fayre golden heares 585

And is there care in heaven ? And is there Fayre Thames streame, that from Ludds stately

love

119 towne

5

And ye, brave Lord, whose goodly personage . 8 Fayre ye be sure, but cruell and unkind 581

Arion, when, through tempests cruel wracke. 578 Firebrand of hell, first tynd in Phlegeton 235

As Diane hunted on a day

586 Fresh Spring, the herald of loves mighty king 583

| As Pilot well expert in perilous wave

112

As then, no winde at all there blew

568

As when a ship, that flyes fayre under sayle 38 GOE, little booke! thy selfe present

440

| Ay me! how many perils doe enfold

49 Great God of love, that with thy cruell darts 262

Ay me! to whom shall I my case complaine . 562 Great wrong I doe, I can it not deny

577

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CALME was the day, and through the trembling I JOY to see how, in your drawen work
ayre

605 I saw, in secret to my Dame
Colin, my deare, when shall it please thee I sing of deadly dolorous debate
sing

480 In brave poursuitt of honorable deed
Colin, well fits thy sad cheare this sad stownd 566 Innocent paper ; whom too cruell hand.
Collyn, I see, by thy new taken taske

5 In that proud port, which her so goodly
Come forth, ye Nymphes, come forth, forsake graceth.
your watóry bowres

Lora

Comming to kisse her lyps, (such grace Ifound,) 582 In vaine I seeke and sew to her for grace

Caddie, for share! hold up thy heavy head 476 In youth, before I waxed old

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563 In vain I thinke, right honourable


9

575

586

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Is it her nature, or is it her will

579 O GOODLY golden chayne, wherewith yfere 54

Is not thilke the mery moneth of May

458 O hatefull hellish Snake! what furie furst 218

Is not thilke same a gotebeard prowde

466 O sacred hunger of ambitious mindes

354

It chaunced me on day beside the shore . 489 O what an easie thing is to descry

381

It falls me here to write of Chastity

1550! What an endlesse work have I in hand 291

It hath bene through all ages ever seene. 252 0! why doe wretched men so much desire 241

It often fals, (as here it earst befell)

247 Of all Gods workes which doe this worlde

It often fals, in course of common life

347 adorne

125

It was the month in which the righteous Maide 512 Of Court, it seemes, men Courtesie doe call

361

It was the time, when rest, soft sliding downe 538 Of lovers sad calamities of old

229

Of this worlds Theatre in which we stay. 581

Oft, when my spirit doth spred her bolder

Joy of my life! full oft for loving you

585 winges

583

One day as I unwarily did gaze

575

One day I sought with her hart-thrilling eies 574

LACKYNG my love, I go from place to place 584 One day I wrote her name upon the sand 584

Leave, lady ! in your glasse of cristall clene 579 One day, whiles that my daylie cares did sleepe 536

Let not one sparke of filthy lustre fyre

585

Like as a ship, that through the Ocean wyde. 418

Like as a ship with dreadfull storm long tost. 377 PENELOPE, for her Ulisses sake

576

Like as an Hynd forth singled from the heard 193

Like as the gentle hart it selte bewrayes . 391

Lo! Collin, here the place whose plesaunt syte 463 RAPT with the rage of mine own ravisht

Lo! I, the Man whose Muse whylome did maske 11 thought.

602

Loe! I have made a Calender for every yeare. 486 Receive, most noble Lord, a simple taste

8

Long languishing in double malady

580 Receive, most Noble Lord, in gentle gree

1

Long-while I sought to what I might compare 574 Redoubted Knights, and honorable Dames

Love lift me up upon thy golden wings 599 Redoubted Lord, in whose corageous mind

8

Love, that long since hast to thy mighty powre 592 Rehearse to me, ye sacred Sisters Nine

497

Lyke as a huntsman after weary chace

583 Remembrance of that most Heroicke spirit 9

Lyke as a ship, that through the Ocean wyde. 578 Renowmed Lord, that for your worthinesse 9

Lyke as the Culver, on the bared bough. 586 Retourne agayne, my forces late dismayd 574

Right well I wote, most mighty Soveraine 79

Rudely thou wrongest my deare harts desire 573

MAGNIFICKE Lord, whose vertues excellent 7

Mark when she smiles with amiable cheare 579

Me thought I saw the grave where Laura lay 5 SEE! how the stubborne damzell doth deprave 577

Men call you fayre, and you doe credit it 584 Shall I then silent be, or shall I speake.

579

More then most faire, full of the living fire 574 Shepheards, that wont, on pipes of oaten reed 559

Most glorious Lord of lyfe! that, on this day. 583 Silence augmenteth grief, writing encreaseth

Most happy letters! fram'd by skilfull trade 584 rage

571

Most Noble Lord, the pillor of my life

8 Since did I leave the presence of my love 586

Most sacred fyre, that burnest mightily . 168 Since I have lackt the comfort of that light 586

My hungry eyes, through greedy covetize 578 So oft as homeward I from her depart

580

My love is lyke to yse, and I to fyre

577 So oft as I her beauty doe behold

581

So oft as I this history record .

200

So oft as I with state of present time

296

NE may I, without blot of endless blame

9 So soone as day forth dawning from the East. 316

New yeare, forth looking out of Janus gate 573 Some Clarkes doe doubt in their devicefull

No wound, which warlike hand of enemy 386

343

Nought is more honorable to a knight 300 Some men, I wote, will deeme in Artegall 322

Nought is on earth more sacred or divine 327 Soone as the morrow fayre with purple beames 91

Nought is there under heav'ns wide hollow- Sweet is the Rose, but growes upon a brere 576

nesse

22 Sweet Smile! the daughter of the Queene of

Nought under heaven so strongly doth allure. 322 Love

578

Now ginnes that goodly frame of Temperaunce 145 Sweet warriour! when shall I have peace with

Now turne againe my teme, thou jolly swayne 402 you ?

581

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TELL me, good Hobbinoll, what garres thee True is, that whilome that good Poet sayd 371
greete?.

454 Trust not the treason of those smyling lookes 580
Tell me, Perigot, what shalbe the game. 470
Tell me, when shall these wearie woes have
end

578 UNQUIET thought! whom at the first I bred 573
That conning Architect of cancred guyle 80 Unrighteous Lord of Love, what law is this 574
That Mantuane Poetes incompared spirit 9 Upon a day, as Love lay sweetly slumbring 586
The antique Babel, Empresse of the East 608
The Chian Peincter, when he was requirde 10
The doubt which ye misdeeme, fayre love, is VENEMOUS toung, tipt with vile adders sting 585
vaine

582
The famous Briton Prince and Faery Knight 155
The famous warriors of anticke world
583 Was it a dreame, or did I see it playne

584
The gentle shepheard satte beside a springe 484 We now have playde (Augustus) wantonly 504
The glorious image of the Maker's beautie 582 Was it the worke of Nature or of Art

576
The glorious pourtraict of that Angels face 575 Weake is th' assurance that weake flesh re-
The joyes of love, if they should ever last 412 poseth

581
The laurel-leafe, which you this day doe weare 577 Well may I weene, faire Ladies, all this while 188
The love which me so cruelly tormenteth 579 Well said the Wiseman, now prov'd true by
The merry Cuckow, messenger of Spring 575 this

267
| The morow next, so soone as Phoebus Lamp: 211 What equall torment to the griefe of mind 257
| The noble hart that harbours vertuous thought 32 What-ever man be he whose heavie minde 542
The Panther, knowing that his spotted hyde. 580 What guyle is this, that those her golden
The paynefull smith, with force of fervent

tresses

578
heat

577 | What man is he, that boasts of fleshly might. 60
The prayse of meaner wits this worke like profit What man so wise, what earthly witt so ware 43
brings

5 What man that sees the ever-whirling wheele 423
The rolling wheele, that runneth often round 575 What Tygre, or what other salvage wight 337
The ragged forhead, that with grave foresight 229 What vertue is so fitting for a knight
The sacred Muses have made alwaies clame 7 What warre so cruel, or what siege so sore

139
The shepheards boy (best knowen by that When I behold that beauties wonderment 576
name)

549 When I bethinke me on that speech whyleare 436
The soverayne beauty which I doo admire 573 When my abodes prefixed time is spent

579
The waies, through which my weary steps I When stout Achilles heard of Helen's rape

6
gnyde

360 When those renoumed noble Peres of Greece. 579
The weary yeare his race now baving run 582 Where is the Antique glory now become 175
The world that cannot deeme of worthy things 585 Wherefore doth vaine antiquitie so vaunt 608
They, that in the course of heavenly spheares Who ever doth to temperance apply

102
are skild
581 Who ever gave more honourable prize

9
This holy season, fit to fast and pray

576 Who now does follow the foule Blatant Beast 407
Tho, whenas chearelesse Night ycovered had 224 Who now shall give unto me words and sound
Thomalin, why sytten we soe.

452 Whoso upon him selfe will take the skill 310
Those prudent heads, that with theire counsels Who so wil seeke, by right deserts, t'attaine 608
wise
7 Wonder it is to see in diverse mindes

182
Though vertue then were held in highest price 296 Wrong'd, yet not daring to expresse my paine 504
Thrise happie shel that is so well assured 581
Thus when Sir Guyon with his faithful guyde 86
To all those happy blessings, which ye have 582 YE gentle Ladies, in whose soveraine powre. 396
To looke upon a worke of rare devise

6 Ye heavenly spirites, whose ashie cinders lie . 526
To praise thy life, or waile thy worthie death 570 Ye learned sisters, which have oftentimes 587
To thee, thou art the sommers Nightingale 8 Ye tradefull Merchants, that, with weary toyle 575
| To you, right noble Lord, whose carefull brest 8 Young knight whatever, that dost armes pro-
True he it said, what ever man it sayd

279
fesse

27

• 366

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