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PARLIAMENTARY

D E B A T ES:

FORMING A CONTINUATION OF THE WORK ENTITLED

“ THE PARLIAMENTARY HISTORY OF ENGLAND,

FROM THE EARLIEST PERIOD TO THE YEAR 1803."

New Series;

COMMENCING WITH THE ACCESSION OF GEORGE IV.

VOL. XXI.

COMPRISING THE PERIOD FROM

THE THIRTY-FIRST DAY OF MARCH,

TO

THE TWENTY-FOURTH DAY OF JUNE, 1829.

L O N D ON:

Printed bp . U. Wangard at the Pater.noster. Row Press,
FOR BALDWIN AND CRADOCK ; J. BOOK ER; LONGMAN, REES, ORME, AND CO.;

J. M. RICHARDSON ; PARBURY, ALLEN, AND CO.; J. HATCHARD AND SON ;
J. RIDGWAY; E. JEFFERY AND SON; J. RODWELL; CALKIN AND BUDD;
R. H. EVANS ; J. BOOTH ; AND T. C. HANSARD.

1829.

Brit Doc 9000.90 LEVEL

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ADVERTISEMENT.

THE Proprietors of this work, in offering a renewal of their acknowledgments for the patronage with which it has been so long honoured, feel those thanks to be no less due for the great indulgence which has been shewn to them, notwithstanding the unfavourable delay which has taken place in the publication of the volumes of the last Session. The causes it would here be useless to explain : but arrangements have been made effectually to prevent their recurrence; and to ensure, in future, to the Subscribers and to the Public in general, the regular appearance of a Part, consisting of about nine sheets, every fortnight, until the termination of each respective Session.

The Paper and the Printing, in consequence of the recently-invented machinery in their respective departments, will be found to have been much improved; and no expense or labour will be spared to render the work deserving not only of the continuance, but of an increase of that patronage which it has, for so many years, enjoyed.

“ Hansard's Parliamentary Debates" consists of two Series : the first, in Forty-one Volumes, commencing with the year 1803, and ending at the period of the Death of George the Third : the second, in Twenty-one Volumes, commencing with the Accession of his present Majesty, George the Fourth, and coming down to the close of the last Session.

To the fidelity and strict impartiality with which it has been conducted, testimonials of the most flattering description have been borne by nearly every one of our great public men, and by all our most distinguished Literary Journals. In the thirty-eighth number of the Quarterly Review will be found an elaborate article, written by the late Mr. CANNING, on Mr. Brougham's Education Committee and the Reform of Charitable Abuses. Having, in the course of it, occasion to refer to the Debates in Parliament on the Renewal of the War in 1815, and to those on the State of the Country in 1816 and 1817, that eminent man took occasion to pronounce HANSARD'S PARLIAMENTARY DEBATES to be a Record, schich, for fidelity, fulness, and despatch, has certainly never been equalled.

Neither has the Edinburgh Review withheld its meed of approbation. “We cannot,” it says, speaking of this work, and of its companion, “The Parliamentary History of England;"we cannot quote this careful and judicious Collection without bearing testiinony to its singular merits. It deserves, as well as the New Edition of the State Trials,' undertaken by the same Proprietors, to be numbered among the most useful and hest-conducted Works of late years. Both are indispensable parts of all Collections of English History." This latter panegyric came, like the former, from the pen of one of the most distinguished Members of the House of Commons.

Of “The Parliamentary History” it is not too much to say, that it has completely superseded all former Collections. In the preface to the recently-published posthumous work of the great modern Historian, Archdeacon Coxe - “Memoirs of the Pelham Administration,”-there is the following valuable tribute to its merits. Speaking of the Parliamentary Journal of the Honourable Philip Yorke, eldest son of Lord Chancellor Hardwicke, Mr. Coxe says, “ This curious narrative, containing a faithful account of the “ Proceedings of the Lower House, recorded under the impression of the moment, and “ accompanied with occasional views of the political history and character of the times, “has been printed by Mr. Hansard, in his collection of Parliamentary Debates. I have “ likewise examined and compared the reports of the speeches given in the Gentleman's " and the London Magazines : but, in tracing the proceedings of the Legislature, I have “ derived the greatest assistance from the Parliamentary History' published by Mr.

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