Introduction to the Study of the Law of the Constitution

Front Cover
Macmillan and Company, 1889 - Constitutional law - 440 pages

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work.

This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.

As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 271 - I can, at any rate, show that the experiments made with it at the end of the seventeenth and the beginning of the eighteenth century fully confirm the high encomium bestowed by Dioscorides upon his indicum.
Page 37 - It hath sovereign and uncontrollable authority in the making, confirming, enlarging, restraining, abrogating, repealing, reviving, and expounding of laws, concerning matters of all possible denominations, ecclesiastical, or temporal, civil, military, maritime, or criminal ; this being the place where that absolute despotic power, which must in all governments reside somewhere, is intrusted by the constitution of these kingdoms.
Page 153 - WHEREAS the Provinces of Canada, Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick have expressed their Desire to be federally united into One Dominion under the Crown of the United Kingdom...
Page 149 - A final judgment or decree in any suit, in the highest court of law or equity of a State in which a decision in the suit could be had...
Page 38 - VIII. and his three children. It can change and create afresh even the constitution of the kingdom and of Parliaments themselves ; as was done by the Act of Union, and the several statutes for triennial and septennial elections. It can, in short, do everything that is not naturally impossible ; and therefore some have not scrupled to call its power, by a figure rather too bold, the omnipotence of Parliament.
Page 40 - An Act for the further Limitation of the Crown, and better securing the Rights and Liberties of the Subject...
Page 61 - America, or relates thereto, it has been declared, " that the King and Parliament of Great Britian will not impose any duty, tax, or assessment whatever, payable in any of His Majesty's colonies, provinces, and plantations in North America or the West Indies, except only such duties as it may be expedient to impose for the regulation of commerce...
Page 37 - The power and jurisdiction of Parliament, says Sir Edward Coke (4 Inst., 36), is so transcendent and absolute, that it cannot be confined, either for causes or persons, within any bounds. And of this high court, he adds, it may be truly said, 'si antiquitatem species, est vetustissima; si dignitatem, est honoratissima; si jurisdictionem, est capacissima.
Page 39 - An Act declaring the rights and liberties of the Subject and settling the Succession of the Crown...
Page 188 - It means, again, equality before the law, or the equal subjection of all classes to the ordinary law of the land administered by the ordinary Law Courts...

Bibliographic information