Memoirs of Theobald Wolfe Tone, Volume 1

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Theobald Wolfe Tone
H. Colburn, 1827 - Ireland
 

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Page 180 - I believe, to say, that this plan met with the warmest approbation and support from both Russell and Emmet ; we shook hands, and having repeated our professions of unalterable regard and esteem for each other, we parted ; and this was the last interview which I was so happy as to have with those two invaluable friends together. I remember it was in a little triangular field that this conversation took place; and Emmet remarked to us that it was in one exactly like it in Switzerland, where William...
Page 69 - ... disclaiming all party views or motives, and acting on a broad original scale, not sparing those who called themselves patriots more than those who were the habitual slaves of the government; a system in which I heartily concurred, having long entertained a more serious contempt for what is called opposition than for the common prostitutes of the treasury bench, who want at least the vice of hypocrisy. At length the solicitor-general, in speaking of the society, having made use of expressions...
Page 179 - As we walked together into town I opened my plan to them both. I told them that I considered my compromise with Government to extend no further than the banks of the Delaware, and that the moment I landed I was free to follow any plan which might suggest itself to me for the emancipation of my country...
Page 24 - In my anger, I made something like a vow that, if ever I had an opportunity, I would make Mr. Pitt sorry, and perhaps fortune may yet enable me to fulfil that resolution.
Page 86 - Government, through the organ of the corporations and grand juries, opened a heavy fire upon us of manifestoes and resolutions. At first we were like young soldiers, a little stunned with the noise, but after a few rounds we began to look about us, and seeing nobody drop with all this furious cannonade, we took courage, and determined to return the fire.
Page 179 - They both agreed with me in those principles and I then proceeded to tell them that my intention was, immediately on my arrival in Philadelphia, to wait on the French minister, to detail to him fully the situation of affairs in Ireland, to endeavour to obtain a recommendation to the French government, and, if I succeeded so far, to leave my family in America and to set off instantly for Paris and apply, in the name of my country, for the assistance of France, to enable us to assert our independence.
Page 240 - Might there not be some danger or delay in a longer navigation ? ' I answered, it would not make a difference of two days, which was nothing in comparison of the advantages. I then told him that I came to France by the direction and concurrence of the men who (and here I was at a loss for a French word, with which, seeing my embarrassment, he supplied me) guided the two great parties I had mentioned.
Page 422 - LETTERS from the EAST, written during a Recent Tour through Turkey, Egypt, Arabia, the Holy Land, Syria, and Greece. By JOHN CARNE, Esq., of Queen's College, Cambridge.
Page 64 - ... assert the independence of their country and their own individual liberties, it was necessary to forget all former feuds, to consolidate the entire strength of the whole nation, and to form for the future but one people. These principles I supported by the best arguments which suggested VOL.
Page 179 - ... that my intention was, immediately on my arrival in Philadelphia, to wait on the French minister, to detail to him, fully, the situation of affairs in Ireland, to endeavour to obtain a recommendation to the French government; and, if I succeeded so far, to leave my family in America, and to set off instantly for Paris, and apply, in the name of my country, for the assistance of France, to enable us to assert our independence.