A HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY ANCIENT AND MODERN

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Page 9 - When the centuries behind me like a fruitful land reposed ; When I clung to all the present for the promise that it closed: When I...
Page 297 - ... as we do from bodies affecting our senses. This source of ideas every man has wholly in himself; and though it be not sense, as having nothing to do with external objects, yet it is very like it, and might properly enough be called Internal Sense.
Page 313 - ... all those bodies which compose the mighty frame of the world, have not any subsistence without a mind ; that their being is to be perceived or known ; that consequently so long as they are not actually perceived by me, or do not exist in my mind, or that of any other created spirit, they must either have no existence at all, or else subsist in the mind of some Eternal Spirit...
Page 299 - ... must necessarily be the product of things operating on the mind in a natural way, and producing therein those perceptions which by the wisdom and will of our Maker they are ordained and adapted to. From whence it follows, that simple ideas are not fictions of our fancies, but the natural and regular productions of things without us really operating upon us ; and so carry with them all the conformity which is intended, or which our state requires ; for they represent to us things under those appearances...
Page 418 - An Outline of the necessary Laws of Thought : A Treatise on Pure and Applied Logic. By WILLIAM THOMSON, DD, Provost of Queen's College, Oxford.
Page 312 - I do not argue against the existence of any one thing that we can apprehend either by sense or reflection. That the things I see with my eyes and touch with my hands do exist, really exist, I make not the least question. The only thing whose existence we deny is that which philosophers call Matter or corporeal substance.
Page 335 - Perhaps few men ever lived who poured into the breasts of youth a more fervid and yet reasonable love of liberty, of truth, and of virtue. How many are still alive, in different countries, and in every rank to which education reaches, who, if they accurately examined their own minds and lives, would not ascribe much of whatever goodness and happiness they possess, to the early impressions of his gentle and persuasive eloquence ! He lived to see his disciples distinguished among the lights and ornaments...
Page 76 - At last some lonians came to the spot, and having supped, as it was summer, bringing their blankets, they lay down to sleep in the cool ; they observed that Socrates continued to stand there the whole night until morning, and that, when the sun rose, he saluted it with a prayer and departed. " I ought not to omit what Socrates is in battle. For in that battle after...
Page 336 - ... of great writers, and with an estimate in general so just of the services rendered to knowledge by a succession of philosophers. They...
Page 313 - ... figure, and it was perceived by sight or touch. This is all that I can understand by these and the like expressions. For as to what is said of the absolute existence of unthinking things without any relation to their being perceived, that is to me perfectly unintelligible. Their esse is percipi; nor is it possible they should have any existence out of the minds or thinking things which perceive them.

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