The Works of Alexander Pope: Correspondence

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J. Murray, 1872 - Poets, English
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Contents

Popes removal to Twickenham He builds
16
19 Urges Broome to be diligent in translating
19
20 Invites Lord and Lady Oxford to Twickenham July 30 1725
21
22 Fenton to Broome Fenton becomes tutor
22
Jan 9 17234
26
26 Arranges to visit Lord Oxford at Down Hall Dec 27 1725
27
Fentons play Not a fit season to publish
28
LETTERS BETWEEN POPE BROOME AND FENTON
30
37 Condoles with Broome on the death of
37
Sept 14 1725
40
43 Popes fever Asks for notes Progress of
43
LETTER
45
2 Lord Orrery to Pope His satisfaction
46
news
47
49 Pope to Broome He is a bad correspondent
49
50 Publication of the Dunciad He has omitted
50
51 Broome gets a 501 prize in the lottery
51
57 His multiplicity of business Il designs
57
62 Broomes translation of the sixteenth book
62
68 Pope to Lord Orrery The urns Political
68
subscribers
73
74 The same His ill health
74
79 Fenton to Broome Invites Broome to Cam
79
33 Lord Oxford to Pope Accepts the dedication
96
98 Fenton to Broome Mr Blount engaged to
98
104 Pope to Broome Popes public denial of
104
60 His distaste for the great world Advises
108
110 Sends some of Atterburys manuscripts
110
65 Fenton to Broome Congratulates Broome
111
113 Broome to Pope His reason for ceasing
113
4 Fears that Eustathius may have miscarried
115
116 His movements Birth of Bordonis child Aug 15 1731
117
119 The cancelled leaf of the Dunciad Lintots
119
82 Broome to Fenton Popes undue claims as
121
122 Lady Margarets illness Atterburys death Mar 16 1732
123
127 A letter of civility
127
51 Lord Oxford to Pope Receives some medals
132
83 Pope to Broome The note of hand for 100
133
134 Lady Margarets marriage
134
Oct 2 1727
139
63 Dangerous illness of his mother and
141
146 Invites Lord and Lady Oxford to Twickenham June 15
147
47 Acknowledges Lord Oxfords enquiries May 6 1728
152
153 Arrangements for accompanying Lord Oxford
153

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Page 159 - Dion, but made small progress in it. As to his other affairs, he died poor, but honest, leaving no debts or legacies, except of a few pounds to Mr. Trumbull and my lady, in token of respect, gratefulness, and mutual esteem. I shall with pleasure take upon me to draw this amiable, quiet, deserving, unpretending christian and philosophical character, in his epitaph. There truth may be spoken in a few words. As for flourish...
Page 182 - The queen has told all the lords the reasons of her parting with him, viz., "that he neglected all business ; that he was seldom to be understood ; that when he did explain himself, she could not depend upon the truth of what he said ; that he never came to her at the time she appointed ; that he often came drunk ; lastly, to crown all, he behaved himself towards her with bad manners, indecency, and disrespect.
Page 158 - Fenton, before y" came ; but stay'd to have inform'd myself & you of ye circumstances of it. All I hear is, that he felt a Gradual Decay, tho' so early in Life, & was declining for 5 or 6 months. It was not, as I apprehended, the Gout in his Stomach, but I believe rather a Complication first of Gross...
Page 289 - nodded in company;" and once slumbered at his own table while the Prince of Wales was talking of poetry.
Page 345 - I wish you had any motive to see this kingdom. I could keep you, for I am rich, that is, I have more than I want. I can afford room for yourself and two servants ; I have indeed room enough, nothing but myself at home. The kind and hearty housewife is dead ! the agreeable and instructive neighbour is gone ! Yet my house is enlarged and the gardens extend and flourish, as knowing nothing of the guests they have lost.
Page 378 - God, guilt was never a rational thing ; it distorts all the faculties of the mind ; it perverts them ; it leaves a man no longer in the free use of his reason ; it puts him into confusion. He has recourse to such miserable and absurd expedients for covering his guilt, as all those who are used to sit in the seat of judgment know have been the cause of detection of half the villanies in the world.
Page 158 - As to any papers left behind him, I dare say they can be but few; for this reason, he never wrote out of vanity, or thought much of the applause of men. I know an...
Page 265 - The society of Mohocks," says Lord Chesterfield, " never existed. " 1 "The historical part," observes Lord Chesterfield of Swift's Four Last Years of the Queen, "is a party pamphlet, founded on the lie of the day, which, as Lord Bolingbroke, who had read it, often assured me, was coined and delivered out to him, to write Examiners and other political papers upon.
Page 117 - Magazine," under the name of Chester. He died at Bath, November 16, 1745, and was buried in the Abbey Church. Of Broome, though it cannot be said that he was a great poet, it would be unjust to deny that he was an excellent versifier ; his lines are smooth and sonorous, and his diction is select and elegant. His rhymes are sometimes unsuitable ; in his " Melancholy," he makes breath rhyme to birth in one place, and to earth in another.
Page 158 - First Book of Oppian. He had begun a tragedy of Dion, but made small progress in it. As to his other affairs, he died poor, but honest, leaving no debts or legacies ; except of a few pounds to Mr.

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