Men and Books: Or, Studies in Homiletics; Lectures Introductory to The Theory of Preaching

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C. Scribner's sons, 1882 - Preaching - 354 pages

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Page 241 - Sound needed none, Nor any voice of joy ; his spirit drank The spectacle : sensation, soul, and form, All melted into him ; they swallowed up His animal being; in them did he live, And by them did he live; they were his life. In such access of mind, in such high hour Of visitation from the living God, Thought was not; in enjoyment it expired.
Page 165 - Nothing at all. What do you learn from a cookerybook? Something new, something that you did not know before, in every paragraph. But would you therefore put the wretched cookerybook on a higher level of estimation than the divine poem? What you owe to Milton is not any knowledge, of which a million separate items are still but a million of advancing steps on the same earthly level; what you owe is power, that is, exercise and expansion to your own latent capacity of sympathy with the infinite, where...
Page 241 - ... minds of the greatest poets in those countries too much to the bondage of definite form; from which the Hebrews were preserved by their abhorrence of idolatry. This abhorrence was almost as strong in our great epic Poet, both from circumstances of his life, and from the constitution of his mind. However imbued the surface might be with classical literature, he was a Hebrew in soul; and all things tended in him towards the sublime.

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