The Letter to Philemon: A New Translation with Notes and Commentary

Front Cover
Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, 2000 - Religion - 561 pages
0 Reviews
"This commentary by Markus Barth and Helmut Blanke is unique for its exhaustive study of the ancient world at the time Philemon was written. The volume examines the institution of slavery in Paul's day, drawing from secular Greco-Roman sources and from other Christian writers of the time. The references to slavery found in Ephesians, Colossians, and 1 Timothy are also compared and contrasted with Paul's statements in Philemon. In addition, the verse-by-verse commentary focuses on important themes in Pauline theology, including love, faith and faithfulness, church unity, providence, free will, and human responsibility. Finally, Barth makes his exposition even more useful by surveying the history of the interpretation of Philemon, from the patristic age to modern liberation theologians." "The product of Markus Barth's lifelong research and completed by Helmut Blanke, this new volume in the Eerdmans Critical Commentary series will become the standard work on Philemon."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

7 Equality
231
8 Haustafeln II Dubious Christianization?
232
9 Union through Baptism?
233
10 Corporate Personality?
235
11 A Divine Call into Slavery?
236
12 Precursors of the Theology of Liberation
238
I The Address vv13
243
Timothy
248

Slave Revolts and Wars
31
The Consolation of Philosophy
33
ManumissionA Legal Way out of Slavery
41
A Motivations and Occasions
42
B Normal Procedures
45
C Sacral Manumission
47
D The Life of Those Freed
49
Old Testament and Later Jewish Traditions
53
A The Loss of Freedom
56
B The Legal Position and the Treatment of Slaves
59
The Theological Foundation
65
The Casuistry of Performance
72
E The Essenes
78
F The Uniqueness of Jewish Legislation and Practice
80
1 Slave Names and Designations
83
2 A First Look at Slavery in Israel
84
3 Crucifixion and Other Modes of Execution
85
4 Plinys and Other Letters of Intercession
86
5 A Warrant of Arrest
87
6 Examples of Slave Insurrections
88
7 Three Phases of Stoicism
92
8 Seneca on Slavery
93
9 State and Private Secular and Sacral Slaves
94
10 Judaism and Abolitionism
96
11 Developments in Jewish Slave Laws and Customs
97
12 Human Rights Established by God
98
13 Circumcision and Covenant Membership
99
14 Philo on the Sabbath and Slave Liberation
100
16 Renounced Manumission
101
I Attestation and Canonization
104
II Textual Integrity and Criticism
106
III Vocabulary Language and Style
108
B Types and Families of Words and Styles
109
C A Private orand Official Letter?
112
D Rhetorical Devices
115
IV Structure and Logic
119
V Date and Place
121
VI Dramatis Personae
128
A Paul His Situation and Intention
130
B Philemon a Good Man and a Slave Owner
137
C Onesimus a Fugitive Returning to His Master
141
VII Parallels and Divergencies in Pauline Literature
150
A Haustafeln
151
B Oneness and Unity Confessions
170
C The Discourse on Gods Calling
191
VIII History and Issues of Interpretation
200
B The Challenge of Liberation Theology
214
C A Survey of Charges and Their Rebuttals
222
1 Theses of John Knox
225
2 Prejudices against Onesimus?
226
3 Onesimus Not a Fugitive?
227
4 Haustafeln I The Opposite of Pauline Ethics?
228
5 Unconditional Surrender?
230
Verse 2
254
House Churches
260
Verse 3
264
II A Christiana Gift to God vv 47
267
Verse 5
271
Love Faith and Faithfulness
273
Verse 6
280
Verse 7
291
The Joy of an Apostle
293
Rest
297
Summary of Versus 47
305
III Intervention for a Slave vv 814
306
Use and Misuse of Full Power
308
Ethics Based on the Gospel
317
Verse 10
324
Inclusive Language of Procreation
329
Verse 11
338
The End of the Past and the Beginning of the Present as Door to the Future
346
Verse 12
351
Verse 13
362
Different Kinds of Wishes
363
Legal Options for Onesimuss Future
367
Why No Plea for Manumission?
368
Freedom in Order to Serve
369
Service according to Paul
372
Verse 14
377
Coercion in Greek Philosophy and in the Pauline Letters
384
Free Will in Philosophical Ethics and in the Greek Old Testament
389
The Cost of Brotherhood vv 1520
394
Providence Free Will and Human Responsibility
405
Verse 16
410
Verse 16a
411
Does Paul Ask for Manumission?
412
Verse 16b
422
Dimensions and Limitations of the Term Brother
423
Verse 16c
450
Other Interpretations
455
Paul Honors the Weak Flesh
461
Verse 17
473
To Be a Sibling and a Slave or Master
476
Verse 18
480
Verse 19
482
Verse 20
485
Conclusion vv 2125
487
Freedom and Obedience
488
VERSE 22
493
3 Greetings v 2324
495
4 Benediction v 25
497
Bibliography
499
Index of Modern Authors
519
Index of Subjects
525
Index of Ancient Literature
532
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

About the author (2000)

Blanke was a student of Markus Barth's and earned a Th.D. from the University of Basel. He is now serving as a pastor in Germany.

Bibliographic information