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“What” begins with a capital because it is the first word in a sentence. There is a question mark after the sentence because it is a question. (e) How big he seemed !

How” begins with a capital letter because There is an exclamation mark after the sentence because it is an exclamatory sentence.

IV. A STORY TO STUDY

The Lion and the Rabbit One night some horned animal hooked the lion as he lay asleep. Who could have done it? No one knew. So the lion ordered all animals with horns to leave the woods.

A rabbit saw the shadow of his long ears. He thought they looked like horns. How frightened he was! He rushed in terror from the woods.

- LA FONTAINE

What is the name, or title, of this story?

Which words in the title begin with capital letters? In studying the title, say,

The first and all important words in titles begin with capital letters.

“The” begins with a capital letter because it is the first word in the title. “Lion” and “Rabbit” begin with capital letters because they are important words in the title.

A STORY TO STUDY

47

The sentences that make up this little story are divided into two groups or paragraphs. The first word in the first paragraph is “One." Notice that this word is written farther to the right than the first word in the line below.

The first word of every paragraph is set in, or indented.

What is the first word in the second paragraph ?
How do you know?
Read the first paragraph.
What does it tell you?
Read the second paragraph.
What does it tell you?

Study each sentence; tell how it begins, and why; how it ends, and why. Study like this:

The first sentence is “ One night some horned animal hooked the lion as he lay asleep.”

The first word in this sentence is indented because it begins a paragraph. One” begins with a capital letter because it is the first word in a sentence. There is a period after the sentence because it is a statement.

The second sentence is “Who” begins with a capital letter because There is a question mark after the sentence because The third sentence is

“No” begins There is a after the sentence because

Study the remaining sentences in the same way.

V. DICTATION This lesson, which your teacher will dictate, will test what you learned about the use of punctuation marks, capitals, and writing paragraphs.

VI. CORRECTING DICTATION

Your teacher will help you to correct what you wrote in the last exercise.1

VII. WRITING STATEMENTS, QUESTIONS,

AND EXCLAMATIONS 1. Here are five statements:

We did not go to New York because it rained.
We played games all the afternoon.
There were six boys at the house.
John came in a carriage.
He left at five o'clock.

Each one of the above statements might be an answer to a question. The first statement would answer the question,

Did you go to New York? or, Why did you not go to New York?

Write five questions in order which might be answered by the five statements.

1 Note to the teacher: In your Manual, pages 47, 48, you will find material and full directions for making these exercises interesting and profitable.

STATEMENTS, QUESTIONS, AND EXCLAMATIONS 49

Remember that the first word of every question must begin with a capital; also that every question must be followed by a question mark. 2. Here are five questions :

How old are you?
Do you like to read ?
What kind of stories do you like best?
What is your favorite game?

Why do you come to school? Write a statement in answer to each of the above questions. Remember that a statement is a sentence, a complete thought, and that each statement must begin with a capital and end with a period.

3. Here are two sentences. They are alike in words, but yet quite different in meaning.

It is raining

It is raining! The first of these sentences is a simple statement. The second is a statement, and something more; it is an exclamatory sentence. What difference can you see between these sentences ?

Any sentence may be an exclamatory sentence. It depends upon what the speaker or writer wants the hearer or reader to understand. I may say calmly, “The wind is rising.” This is a

simple statement. But I may be

But I may be very much excited or surprised or frightened; then I cry, “The wind is rising !” If you hear me speak, you can tell by my voice whether I am simply making a statement or whether I am excited and crying out, or exclaiming. In writing, the punctuation of the sentence must tell how the writer feels.

Change each of the five statements below into exclamatory sentences :

A little child has fallen in the road.
A great automobile rushes down upon her. .
The onlookers cry out.
One brave man rushes before the car.
The child is saved.

VIII. WRITING TITLES

1. Look carefully at the titles in the following list. Copy six of them, telling yourself why each capital is used. Remember that the first and all important words in titles begin with capital letters.

Bed in Summer
The Man and his Old Horse
The Life of Lincoln
Hunting the Lion
The Liberty Bell
The Battle of the Strong

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