Page images
PDF
EPUB

V. A GAME OF WORDS Your teacher will tell you how to play this interesting game.

[ocr errors]

COO

VI. CHOOSING THE BEST WORDS FOR

CRIES OF ANIMALS Below is a list of words that describe the cries or noises made by animals. Copy it, writing before each word the name of an animal or animals that make the noise. bark chirp

eackle

purr mew

twitter squeal quack roar low

grunt gobble neigh sing growl croak hiss bray peep yelp squeak buzz snarl chatter bleat

crow

howl bellow What words can you add to this list? Which of the above words describes a dog's cry when he is hurt? when he is angry?

When does a cat purr? When does it mew?

caw

[ocr errors]

VII. A WORD GAME
This game is even more interesting than the
Game of Words in Section V. Your teacher will
show you how to play it.

i Note to the teacher: Your Manual gives full directions, page 35

2 Note to the teacher: Full directions are in your Manual, page 36.

2

DESCRIBING BY COMPARING WITH ANIMALS 37

VIII.

DESCRIBING BY COMPARING WITH

ANIMALS

Probably you have been told many times to be “as quiet as a mouse.” How quiet does that mean?

Perhaps you have often said, “I am as hungry as a bear.” How hungry were you?

Did you ever hear anyone called “as slow as a snail"? How slow does that mean?

Such comparisons give emphasis, because everyone thinks of the mouse as very quiet, the bear as very hungry, and the snail as very slow.

Below are some of the many comparisons of this kind that are much used. Copy them, writing in each blank the name of the animal best described.

1. As slow as a
2. As swift as a
3. As sly as a
4. As gentle as a
5. As timid as a
6. As dirty as a
7. As black as a
8. As greedy as a
9. As mischievous as a
10. As cross as a
11. As quiet as a
12. As proud as a
13. As bold as a

IX. WORDS DESCRIBING THE SIZE OF

ANIMALS

Write the names of all the animals you know. Opposite each write the word that best describes its size. Do not be satisfied with "big" or "little," but try to use words that describe the animal more exactly. Below are some of the words you may use. Add any others you know.

big
large
great
huge
enormous

little
small
tiny
short
long

broad
gigantic
thin
tall
immense

X. THE COLORS OF ANIMALS

Write the names of all the animals you know, and opposite each name write the word telling the color of the animal.

XI. CHAPTER TEST

Think of any animal that you have seen and describe it. Make a true description, using as many of the words you have studied in the last few lessons as you can. Do not name the animal you are describing. If your description is good, your classmates should be able to name it.

CHAPTER THREE

SENTENCES: WHAT THEY ARE AND HOW TO

USE THEM

Note to the teacher: Constant use of your Manual will prove no less helpful in this chapter than in those that have preceded.

I. THE SENTENCE

1. I have a thought about a dog. I want you to have the same thought. I express my thought

when I say,

John's savage dog is in the yard. As you hear or read these words you get the same thought that I have.

[blocks in formation]

I express and you get only a part of my thought. This one word tells what I am thinking about, dog not horse, sheep, or cat — but it does not tell my thought about "dog." If I say only,

savage dog, I tell and you know the kind of dog that I have in mind, but you do not know what I think about “savage dog."

[blocks in formation]

I tell to whom the savage dog that I have in mind belongs, but I still do not tell, and you do not know, what I think about "John's savage dog." I may have any one a score of thoughts, such as:

John's savage dog bit the child,

[ocr errors]

or,

John's savage dog never bites,

or,

John's savage dog is dead.

But when I say,

John's savage dog is in the yard, I express a complete thought, and everyone who hears or reads my words knows what that thought is.

A complete thought expressed in words is called a sentence.

“John's savage dog is in the yard” is a sentence, because these words express a complete thought.

“Dog” is not a sentence, for it does not express a complete thought.

“Is" is not a sentence, for it does not express a complete thought.

« PreviousContinue »