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WRITING DESCRIPTIONS

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1. We must have in our own minds a very clear picture of the thing we want to describe.

2. We must choose words that will make our mind picture clear to others.

The author could not give a clear description of any one animal in the ark because he could not get a mind picture of any one that was different from the others.

Have you a clear mind picture of any animal named on page 139? If so, think over and compare the words you may use to make others see the picture you have in your mind; choose the words that you think best. Then describe the animal. You need not name the animal; let your classmates name it from your description.

XI. WRITING DESCRIPTIONS

Read again the description of the Noah's Ark on page 137. The writer made the description so interesting that one feels like opening the ark with him and taking out Noah and his wife and sons and the queer striped and spotted animals to play with.

What toy that you have do you like best? Write a description of it. In writing, remember these four things :

1. Have a clear picture in your own mind.

2. Tell of the things about your toy that make it different from others.

3. Choose words that will make your description clear and easily understood. Use the dictionary, if necessary.

4. Make your description interesting, so that others will wish either to play with your toy or to have one like it.

Your title may be :

The Toy I Like Best

XII.

CHAPTER TEST: READING AND
CRITICIZING DESCRIPTIONS 1

i Note to the teacher: See Manual, page 126.

CHAPTER ELEVEN

MEMORY GEMS, POETRY AND PROSE; QUALITIES OF TRUE AMERICANS; CONTRASTING WORDS;

CORRECT SPEECH

Note to the teacher: The most resourceful teachers find help in every chapter of the Manual. No teacher can afford not to refer to it constantly.

I. READING AND STUDYING A POEM Many beautiful poems have been written about each month. Below is one for the first month of the year. Read it through carefully, sounding clearly all the -ing endings, saying and distinctly, and pronouncing each word clearly, distinctly, and in a pleasant voice.

January
Sparkling world and shining sky,
Sleigh bells jingling, jangling by,
Skates that gleam and sleds that fly,

Make up January.
Snow and shine, and shine and snow,
Days that swiftly come and go,
Thirty-one of them, you know,

Make up January.

This poem is a description of January in a place that has cold, sparkling, snowy weather. Do you live in a place like the one described ?

Which words in the poem make you think of fast motion? which of noise?

Now reread the poem, making your hearers see and hear while you read it what you see and hear in your

mind.

II. WORDS THAT DESCRIBE

Make a list of all the words you can think of that you might use in describing snow. Think how snow looks and how it feels.

III. WORDS AND THEIR OPPOSITES

come

Copy the words below. At the right of each write a word that has exactly the opposite meaning.

sparkling noisy
shortest whisper melting
crying
never

beautiful
silence
dark

winter
under
joy

peace

IV. MAKING CONTRASTS Two things that are alike in some way may be compared. In this sentence,

This paper is as white as snow,

MAKING CONTRASTS

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the paper and snow are compared because of the likeness in color. Such a comparison is often used for emphasis.

Two things that are quite unlike in some ways may be contrasted. In this sentence,

Feathers are light; lead is heavy, feathers and lead are contrasted because of their unlikeness in weight.

Contrasts, like comparisons, serve to emphasize and to make clear and interesting.

Finish the following sentences containing contrasts by writing in place of the dashes words that contrast with the italicized words.

(a) January is one of the longest months; February is the month.

(6) The sparkling snow covered the ground.

(c) I always like to see you come; I — like to see you

(d) There is some joy and some in every day. (e) Peace is better than (f) Winter is cold; is (9) Outside it was dark; (h) All night the water froze; all it (i) Some babies laugh all day; other babies — all

it was

(j) The room that had been noisy all day became

at

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