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of me

2. Read the following groups of words, saying "of" clearly. Pronounce it as if it were spelled ov. of gay summer

of the door
of starvation

of grain
3. Read the following quotations, speaking
the words clearly and distinctly.

(a) I've been to London to visit the Queen.
(6) His sleigh is long and deep and wide;

It will carry a host of things,
While dozens of drums hang over the side,

With sticks sticking under the strings.
(c) The grumbling grew to a mighty rumbling;

And out of the houses the rats came tumbling.
(d) Said the Wind to the Moon,

“I will blow you out."

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IV. SPEAKING CORRECTLY: PRESENT AND

PAST TIME
1. Compare these two sentences.

The cricket sings in the garden.

The cricket sang in the garden.
In the first sentence, when does the cricket sing,
in the present or in the past ? Notice the form of
the word, "sings."

1 Note to the teacher: For directions, see Manual, page 114.

In the second sentence, when does he sing, in the present or in the past ? Notice the form of the word, “sang."

2. In the sentences below, the italicized words tell of something being done now, at the present time. Copy these sentences, and after each write a sentence telling of the same thing done in the past. After the first sentence, you should write this sentence,

! 1

The cricket found no crumbs.

(a) The cricket finds no crumbs.
(6) The ant sees the snow-covered ground.
(c) The ant lends the cricket no grain.
(d) The cricket dies.
(e) The ant keeps grain for the winter.
(f) The ant says, “ We ants never lend."
(9) The cricket borrows grain.
(h) The crickets look gay.
(0) You live without work.
(j) I wish only to borrow.

V. USING THE DICTIONARY 1

Each of the words below is used in the rhyme, The Ant and the Cricket.

Copy each word and find it in the dictionary. Read the line of the rhyme in which the word

1 Note to the teacher: See Manual, page 116.

WRITING A STORY

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occurs, using a meaning of the word in place of the word. When you find a meaning that fits and that makes good sense, write this meaning opposite the word on your paper. The first word, with its meaning, should be written like this:

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complain
moral

complain find fault

starvation
famine
hastily

miserly
shelter
wicket

repay

VI. WRITING A STORY
If

you answer each of the following questions in a complete sentence, you will tell the story of the ant and the cricket. The questions are arranged in groups. The answers to each group of questions make a paragraph. Do not copy the questions. When you are not sure of an answer, look at the rhyme in your book.

Write your title first, then each paragraph in order, until you have made the whole story.

(1) What had a silly cricket done all spring and summer?

At last what kind of days came?
Then how did the cricket feel? Why?
(2) To whom did the cricket go for help?

For what did he ask? (Do not say, He asked for food and shelter, but write the exact words that you

think he may have said. Perhaps you will want to make several sentences in answer to this question.)

(3) What did the ant tell him about the customs of all the ants? Give the ant's exact words.

What question did he ask?
(4) What was the cricket's answer?
(5) What did the ant then say to the cricket?
(6) What did the ant do to the cricket?

In writing, remember that the name of the person addressed is always separated from the rest of the sentence by a comma or by two commas.

VII. HOW NAMES ARE WRITTEN

The Spilled Ink Mary, did you spill the ink on the carpet ?” asked Tom.

“No, Tom,” answered Mary. “Did you, Will?” “I did not, Mary, but I know who did,” said Will. “ Who was it, Will?”

Will did not answer in words. He pointed a finger at the puppy, and the guilty little dog crept under the sofa.

What are the names of the people in this story? How does each name begin?

Every name of a person must begin with a capital letter.

Study this story, telling what words begin with capitals and why; which words are indented

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“ The ” begins with a capital because

Spilled ” and “ Ink” begin with capitals because

“ Mary

Paragraph I: “ Mary

Mary” is indented because
Mary” begins with a capital because
There is a comma to separate

from the rest of the sentence because “Mary" is the name of the person addressed.

There are quotation marks around because
The quotation ends with a question mark because

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Tom” begins with a capital letter because it is the name of a person.

There is a period after the sentence because
Study the other paragraphs in the same way.

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VIII. WRITING STUDIED DICTATION1

IX. CORRECTING DICTATION1

X. WRITING DIRECT QUOTATIONS 1. John asked Harry to go fishing.

The above sentence may be written in several ways, as follows:

1 Note to the teacher: For material and directions, see Manual, page 119.

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