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CHAPTER EIGHT

TELLING STORIES FROM PICTURES AND FROM

PERSONAL EXPERIENCES

Note to the teacher: Your Manual will help you to make this chapter intensely interesting and profitable.

I.

FINDING A STORY IN A PICTURE

On the opposite page is the picture of a boy riding as fast as he can. He may be in a hurry to get away from somebody or something. Do you think he looks frightened? Perhaps he is trying to get somewhere very quickly. Why do you think he is riding so fast?

1. Perhaps he is going for a doctor. Is someone ill ? Has someone been hurt? Who? If someone has been hurt, how? (A fall? A broken bone? A cut? An accident - of what kind ?)

of what kind ?) Why was the boy sent? (Had he caused the accident? Was no man able to go? Could the boy ride faster than any other person there? Did he know the shortest way?)

2. Perhaps the boy is riding to warn people of some danger. (

(An enemy marching upon them? An Indian attack? The bursting of a dam? Forest fires ?)

3. Perhaps a building is on fire and the boy is hurrying for help.

Did the boy do what he set out to do? How?

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II. TELLING A PICTURE STORY FROM AN

OUTLINE1

Tell the story the picture on page 107 tells to you. Try to make it interesting. The following outline will help you keep the story facts in order.

1. Something happened that made it necessary for the boy to take the ride.

2. The things that happened on the way.
3. The boy tells his news.
4. How the story ends.

III. TELLING TRUE STORIES FROM

OUTLINES 2

Were you ever sent anywhere in a hurry? Where? Why? What happened on the way? How did you finish the errand ?

Make an interesting true story in answering the above questions.

IV. FOLLOWING AN OUTLINE IN MAKING

A STORY FROM A PICTURE

Why is the child on the track (p. 110)? Is he asleep? Has he been hurt? Has he fainted ?

1 Note to the teacher: Before assigning this exercise, see what your Manual says, page 105.

2 Note to the teacher: See Manual (page 108) for suggestions.

PRONOUNCING OW AND OU

109

Where has the child been? Has he any right to be on a railway track?

What danger is he in? How long will it take the train to run around the curve and reach him?

Who has come to his rescue? Will the dog save the child? How?

Make a story from the picture, following this outline.

(1) Boy who has been told never to cross railroad tracks, except at a crossing, starts home from school.

(2) He decides to take a short cut across the tracks. (3) He meets with an accident and cannot move. (4) A passenger train steams toward him. (5) A dog runs to his rescue. (6) The rescue. (7) How it all ended.

Give your story a good title.

V. PRONOUNCING OW AND OU

The sound of ow in how is the same as the sound of ou in found. This sound occurs in a great many words, so it is very important that you form the habit of giving it correctly.

1. Show that you can do this by pronouncing the following words, giving the ow sound clearly, without drawling.

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