Aldine Second Language, Book for Grades Five and Six

Front Cover

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

SECTION PAGE III MAKING PARAGRAPH SENTENCES
81
A WRITTEN TEST
83
SPEAKING WORDS CORRECTLY
85
Books I AM READING
86
STUDYING A DIALOGUE
87
WRITING A NARRATIVE FROM A DIALOGUE
89
SHOWING SELFRELIANCE
90
CHAPTER TEST
92
WRITING FABLES AND SHORT STORIES I A FABLE TO STUDY
93
WRITING A FABLE FROM DICTATION
95
MAKING AND TELLING ORIGINAL FABLES
96
MAKING COMPARISONS
98
WRITING AN ORIGINAL FABLE
101
ENLARGING A PARAGRAPH
102
ENLARGING PARTS OF A FABLE
103
REWRITING A FABLE
104
WRITING A FABLE FROM A CONVER SATION
105
TELLING STORIES FROM PIC TURES AND FROM PERSONAL EXPERIENCES I FINDING A STORY IN A PICTURE OUTLINE
106
TELLING TRUE STORIES FROM OUTLINES 108 III TELLING TRUE STORIES FROM OUTLINES IV FOLLOWING AN OUTLINE IN MAKIN...
108
PRONOUNCING OW AND OU
109
DANGEROUS PLACES
111
FINDING STORIES IN A PICTURE
112
Making ORIGINAL OUTLINES AND STORIES
114
FINDING OUT SOMETHING AND TELLING ABOUT IT
115
CHAPTER TEST
116
RHYMES WRITTEN REPRODUC TIONS SPEAKING CORRECTLY USING THE DICTIONARY QUOTATIONS AND CAPITALS SECTION PAG...
117
SPEAKING WORDS CLEARLY
120
ORAL REPRODUCTION OF A FABLE
121
USING THE DICTIONARY
122
WRITING A STORY
123
How NAMES ARE WRITTEN
124
WRITING STUDIED DICTATION
125
THINGS TO REMEMBER
127
DRAMATIZING PLAY WRITING DESCRIPTIONS ORIGINAL STORIES DICTION ARY STUDY CLEAR SPEECH I STUDYING A STORY
129
USING THE DICTIONARY
131
PREPARING TO DRAMATIZE A STORY
132
DRAMATIZING A STORY
133
SPEAKING CLEARLY AND DISTINCTLY
134
WRITING A PLAY
135
STUDYING A DESCRIPTION
137
USING THE DICTIONARY
139
GIVING DESCRIPTIONS
140
WRITING DESCRIPTIONS
141
READING AND CRITICIZING DESCRIP TIONS
142
MEMORY GEMS POETRY AND PROSE QUALITIES OF TRUE AMERICANS CONTRASTING WORDS CORRECT SPEECH I READING AND S...
143
WORDS THAT DESCRIBE
144
A SPRING MEMORY GEM
146
COPYING A MEMORY GEM
147
WORDS THAT DESCRIBE GOOD AMERICANS
148
TRUE AND FAITHFUL CITIZENS
150
MONTHS DAYS AND ABBRE
152
WRITING A LETTER
160
USING THE CORRECT WORD
166
MAKING A PENTANGLE CLUB LANGUAGE BOOK
173
CLEARNESS
179
SECTION PAGE I TRUE STORIES
182
USING THE DICTIONARY
185
TELLING TRUE STORIES
186
A WRITTEN LESSON
188
THE HARDEST WORDS TO SPELL
189
Two USES OF THE APOSTROPHE
190
STUDYING THE USE OF MARKS AND FORMS
191
WRITING FROM DICTATION
192
ANSWERING GRANDFATHERS LETTER
194
PARAGRAPHS TOPICAL OUT LINES ORIGINAL STORIES LETTERS PUNC TUATION DICTIONARY STUDY I WHAT PARAGRAPHS ARE
196
USING THE DICTIONARY
199
MAKING PARAGRAPH TOPICS
200
WORDS AND THEIR OPPOSITES
201
LEARNING TO RECOGNIZE PARAGRAPHS BY THEIR CONTENTS
202
TELLING A STORY FROM AN OUTLINE
204
TELLING A STORY FROM A GIVEN OUTLINE
205
WRITING ORIGINAL STORIES FROM ORIGINAL OUTLINES
206
WORDS IN A SERIES
208
WRITING A DESCRIPTION
220
COMMON AND PROPER
221
CHOOSING NOUNS THAT FIT
225
SELECTING NOUNS TO AVOID REPETITION
226
SINGULAR AND PLURAL NOUNS
228
PRONOUNS
231
MISTAKES IN THE USE OF PRONOUNS
233
PRACTICE IN THE USE OF PRONOUNS
234
SINGULAR AND PLURAL PRONOUNS
235
ADJECTIVES
236
COMPARISONS
237
MAKING ORIGINAL COMPARISONS
239
EXPLAINING AND DESCRIBING BY COMPARISON
240
WRITING A DESCRIPTION OF A PERSON
242
READING AND CRITICIZING DESCRIPTIONS
243
OVERWORKED ADJECTIVES
245
A LETTER ABOUT BOOKS
246
DESCRIPTIONS TO EXPRESS BEAUTY
247
DESCRIPTIONS TO MAKE CLEAR
248
CHAPTER TEST
249
POEMS COMPOSITIONS VERBS AND ADVERBS I A POEM TO STUDY
251
SPEAKING CLEARLY AND DISTINCTLY
255
MEMORIZING A POEM
256
FINDING VERBS
260
SELECTING SUITABLE VERBS
261
SOME TROUBLESOME VERBS
262
Lie Lay Sit sei
264
Shall Or Will ?
265
THEIR USE AS MODIFIERS OF VERBS
268
SELECTING SUITABLE ADVERBS
269
OTHER USES OF ADVERBS
270
SOME ADVERBS THAT ARE OFTEN MISUSED
272
MAKING COMPARISONS WITH ADJECTIVES
273
MAKING COMPARISONS WITH ADVERBS
276
DESCRIBING A GAME OR A SHORT
278
WHAT THEY ARE AND HOW TO USE THEM SECTION PAGE I PREPOSITIONS
279
STUDYING PREPOSITIONS
282
SOME PREPOSITIONS THAT ARE OFTEN MISUSED
283
USING PREPOSITIONS
285
CONJUNCTIONS
287
COMBINING SENTENCES
289
COMBINING SENTENCES IN A STORY
290
SOME CONJUNCTIONS THAT ARE OFTEN MISUSED
291
WRITTEN REPRODUCTION
292
EXPRESSING FEELINGS BY USING INTERJECTIONS
294
How INTERJECTIONS CHANGE MEANING
295
STUDYING A Poets CHOICE OF WORDS
296
PREPARING TO READ A POEM
300
READING A POEM
301
MEMORIZING AND RECITING А PoEM
302
PROVERBS AND PROVERB STORIES I WHAT ARE PROVERBS ?
304
ORIGIN OF PROVERBS
306
THE WIDER MEANING OF PROVERBS
308
MAKING PROVERB STORIES
309
WRITING PROVERB STORIES
311
CHAPTER TEST
312
WRITING AND ANSWERING NOTES OF INVITATION AND BUSINESS LETTERS I NOTES OF INVITATION ACCEPTANCE AND REGRET
313
WRITING AN INVITATION
315
WRITING A NOTE OF ACCEPTANCE
316
REPLYING TO A FORMAL INVITATION
318
WRITING A FORMAL INVITATION
320
FORMAL NOTES OF ACCEPTANCE AND REGRET
321
WRITING BUSINESS LETTERS
324
EXPLANATIONS AND REASONS
325
A LETTER
331
ONEMINUTE STORIES
337
STUDYING A POEM
343
How HONESTY MAY BE SHOWN
352
ONE HUNDRED SPELLING DEMONS
359
THE SENTENCE
365
MAKING SENTENCES
375
STATEMENTS QUESTIONS AND EXCLA
381
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 258 - I steal by lawns and grassy plots, I slide by hazel covers ; I move the sweet forget-me-nots That grow for happy lovers. I slip, I slide, I gloom, I glance, Among my skimming swallows ; I make the netted sunbeam dance Against my sandy shallows. I murmur under moon and stars In brambly wildernesses ; I linger by my shingly bars ; I loiter round my cresses ; And out again I curve and flow To join the brimming river, For men may come and men may go, But I go on for ever.
Page 257 - I chatter over stony ways, In little sharps and trebles ; I bubble into eddying bays ; I babble on the pebbles.
Page 344 - His hair is crisp, and black, and long, His face is like the tan ; His brow is wet with honest sweat, He earns whate'er he can, And looks the whole world in the face, For he owes not any man. Week in, week out, from morn till night, You can hear his bellows blow ; You can hear him swing his heavy sledge, With measured beat and slow, Like a sexton ringing the village bell, When the evening sun is low.
Page 297 - Continuous as the stars that shine And twinkle on the milky way, They stretched in never-ending line Along the margin of a bay: Ten thousand saw I at a glance, Tossing their heads in sprightly dance. The waves beside them danced; but they Out-did the sparkling waves in glee: A poet could not but be gay, In such a jocund company: I gazed— and gazed— but little thought What wealth the show to me had brought...
Page 69 - The year's at the spring And day's at the morn; Morning's at seven; The hill-side's dew-pearled; The lark's on the wing; The snail's on the thorn: God's in his heaven — All's right with the world!
Page 257 - I wind about, and in and out, With here a blossom sailing, And here and there a lusty trout, And here and there a grayling, And here and there a foamy flake Upon me, as I travel With many a silvery waterbreak Above the golden gravel...
Page 252 - Sign of a nation, great and strong To ward her people from foreign wrong: Pride and glory and honor, — all Live in the colors to stand or fall. Hats off! Along the street there comes A blare of bugles, a ruffle of drums; And loyal hearts are beating high: Hats off! The flag is passing by!
Page 343 - The village smithy stands ; The smith, a mighty man is he, With large and sinewy hands ; And the muscles of his brawny arms Are strong as iron bands. His hair is crisp, and black, and long, His face is like the tan ; His brow is wet with honest sweat, He earns whate'er he can, And looks the whole world in the face, For he owes not any man.
Page 297 - I WANDERED lonely as a cloud That floats on high o'er vales and hills, When all at once I saw a crowd, A host of golden daffodils, Beside the lake, beneath the trees, Fluttering and dancing in the breeze. Continuous as the stars that shine And twinkle on the Milky Way, They stretched in never-ending line Along the margin of a bay: Ten thousand saw I at a glance, Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.
Page 305 - Experience keeps a dear School, but Fools will learn in no other, and scarce in that; for it is true, we may give Advice, but we cannot give Conduct...

Bibliographic information