The comprehensive history of England, from the earliest period to the suppression of the Sepoy revolt, by C. MacFarlane and T. Thomson, Volume 2

Front Cover

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 170 - I know I have the body of a weak and feeble woman, but I have the heart and stomach of a king, and of a king of England too...
Page 380 - Nevertheless, against the tenor of the said statutes, and other the good laws and statutes of your realm to that end provided...
Page 466 - Certainly," says Whitlocke,** with his usual candor, "never any man acted such a part, on such a theatre, with more wisdom, constancy, and eloquence, with greater reason, judgment, and temper, and with a better grace in all his words and actions, than did this great and excellent person; and he moved the hearts of all his auditors, some few excepted, to remorse and pity.
Page 346 - ... speaking, reasoning, or declaring of any matter or matters touching the parliament or parliament business ; and that, if any of the said members be complained of and questioned for...
Page 381 - The King willeth that right be done according to the laws and customs of the realm; and that the statutes be put in due execution, that his subjects may have no cause to complain of any wrong or oppressions, contrary to their just rights and liberties, to the preservation whereof he holds himself as well obliged as of his prerogative.
Page 268 - Out of every corner of the woods and glens they came creeping forth upon their hands, for their legs could not bear them ; they looked like anatomies of death ; they spoke like ghosts crying out of their graves...
Page 56 - Be of good comfort, master Ridley, and play the man. We shall this day light such a candle, by God's grace, in England, as I trust shall never be put out.
Page 345 - England, and the making and maintenance of laws, and redress of mischiefs and grievances which daily happen within this realm, are proper subjects and matter of counsel and debate in Parliament ; and that in the handling and proceeding of those businesses, every Member of the House hath, and of right ought to have, freedom of speech to propound, treat, reason, and bring to conclusion, the same...
Page 242 - A coach was a strange monster in those days, and the sight of one put both horse and man into amazement. Some said it was a great crabshell brought out of China, and some imagined it to be one of the pagan temples, in which the cannibals adored the divell.
Page 288 - You shall swear by the blessed Trinity, and by the sacrament you now propose to receive, never to disclose directly or indirectly, by word or circumstance, the matter that shall be proposed to you to keep secret, nor desist from the execution thereof until the rest shall give you leave.

Bibliographic information