An Impartial History of Ireland from the Period of the English Invasion to the Present Time, Volume 1

Front Cover
J. Christie, 1809 - Ireland

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 475 - Out of every corner of the woods and glens they came creeping forth upon their hands, for their legs could not bear them; they looked like anatomies of death ; they spake like ghosts crying out of their graves...
Page 463 - And another time, when the queen would not be persuaded that it was his writing whose name was to it, but that it had some more mischievous author; and said with great indignation, That she would have him racked to produce his author...
Page 463 - I found none, but for felony very many. And when her majesty hastily asked me, Wherein ? I told her, the author had committed very apparent theft; for he had taken most of the sentences of Cornelius Tacitus, and translated them into English, and put them into his text.
Page 308 - ... them seemeth should pass in the same parliament, and such causes, considerations, and acts, affirmed by the king and his council, to be good and expedient for that land, and his licence thereupon, as well in affirmation of the said causes and acts, as to summon the said parliament under his great seal of England had and obtained...
Page 134 - ADRIAN the bishop, the servant of the servants of God, to his most dear son in Christ, the noble king of England, sendeth greeting, and...
Page 464 - The government of England during that age, however different in other particulars, bore in this respect some resemblance to that of Turkey at present: the sovereign possessed every power, except that of imposing taxes; and in both countries, this limitation, unsupported by other privileges, appears rather prejudicial to the people.
Page 335 - it was a declaration of perpetual war, not only against the native Irish, but against every person of English blood, who had settled beyond the limits of the pale, and from motives of personal interest, or convenience, had formed connexions with the natives, or adopted their laws and customs : And it had the full effect which might have been expected ; it drew closer the confederacy it was meant to dissolve, and implicated the colony of the pale in ceaseless warfare and contention with each other,...
Page 464 - Haywarde for treason, could easily have been executed, let his book have been ever so innocent. While so many terrors hung over the people, no jury durst have acquitted a man, when the court was resolved to have him condemned. The practice, also, of not confronting witnesses with the prisoner gave the crown lawyers all imaginable advantage against him. And, indeed, there scarcely occurs an instance, during all these reigns, that the sovereign or the ministers were ever disappointed in the issue of...
Page 276 - ... of late been issued under another seal, and the subjects summoned into England to prosecute their suits before a foreign jurisdiction, to the great grievance of the people, and in violation of the rights and franchises of the land ; they enact that for the future no persons shall be obliged by any commandment under any other seal but...
Page 475 - ... and if they found a plot of watercresses or shamrocks, there they flocked as to a feast for the time...

Bibliographic information