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her colonies; shewing what proportion of her commerce The carries on with Great britain, what with the colonies, what with Great Britain and the colonies conjointly, and what with the rest of the world, op a seven years average ; taken from the custom-house books of Ireland, and valued according to the old custom-house rates :

“ An account of the total annual value of the Imports into “ and Exports from Great Britain, on an average of four “ years, to the 5th January, 1799, distinguishing the Imports « from, and Exports to 'reland, from those to and from the

rest of the world, ext acted from Mr. Irving's account, “ No. 17, and rated according to the old rates of the Cul“tom-house. “ Total value of Imports into Britain, £23,293,612 “ Total value of the Imports from Ireland, 2,812,383

Ire-} 20,481,229

« Value of Imports from the world, Ire

« Jand excepted, “ Total value of Exports from Britain, “ Total value of Exports to Ireland,

30,063,662 2,733,576

“ Value of Exports to the world

, Ireland} £27,329,792

excepted," By this account it appears that Britain imports from Ireland about of her i ports, and that she exports to Ireland about Yr of her exports. Let this statement be compared with that which in mediately follows, and then it will be seen in whose favour the benefit of the commercial intercourse between Great Britain and Ireland runs, and which country could best do without the albistance of the other : The exports from Ireland to all the world

for seven years, to Lady-day 1797, are valued at

£34,394,899 The average of each year amounts to

4,913,557 Seven years average export to Great Britain alone,

3,909,946 Seven years average export to all the reft of the world,

£1,003,611 From this account it appears, that the exports from Ireland to Great Britain alone, amount to f of her whole exports.

The

The imports into Ireland from all the world

for seven years to Lady day 1797, are valued
at

£29,075,176 The average of each year amounts to

4,153,596 Seven years average import from Great Britain alone,

2,901,850 Seven years average import from the rest of the world,

£1,251,749

This account (hews that Ireland imports from Great-
Britain of her whole imports.
Seven years exports from Ireland to Britain, £27,369,627
Seven years imports from Britain into Ireland, 20,312,956
Balance,

£7,056,671

Seven years average exports from Ireland to
Britain,

£3,909,946
Seven years average imports from Britain into
Ireland,

2,901,850 Yearly average balance,

£1,008,096

By this account we see the balance in favour of Ireland. Seven years exports from Ireland to the British colonies,

£2,274,251 Seven years imports into Ireland from British colonies,

1,462,217 Balance in favour of Ireland,

£812,034

£324,893

Seven years average exports from Ireland to

British colonies,
Seven years average imports into Ireland from
British colonies,

Yearly balance in favour of Ireland,

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208,888 £116,005

Thus we see that there is yearly a balance against the colonies of 116,0051. in favour of Ireland.

Seven years exports from Ireland to, Britain and
her colonies,

£29,643,878
Seven years imports from Eritain and her colo-
Dies-into Ireland,

21,771,271 Balance in favour of Ireland,

£7,872,607 Seven years average exports from Ireland to Britain and her colonies,

£4,234,839 Seven years average imports from Britain and her colonies into Ireland,

3,110,181 Yearly balance in favour of Ireland, £1,124,658 From this account it appears, that upon a comparison of the trade between Ireland and Great Britain and her colo. nies, the balance is annually 1,124,6581. in favour of Ire. land.

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Seven years average export from Ireland to the
whole world,

£4,913,557
Seven years average export from Ireland to
Britain and her colonies,

4,234,839 Seven years' average export from Ireland to the rest of the world,

2,678,718 Seven years average import into Ireland from all the world,

£ 4,153,596 Seven years average import into Ireland from Britain and her colonies,

3,110, 1S1 Seven years average import into Ireland from the rest of the world,

1,043,415 Seven years average export to all the world Except Britain and her colonies,

678,718 Yearly balance against Ireland,

6364,697 Upon the whole of these accounts it appears, that of the Britii imports, i comes from Ireland; that of the British exports, i only goes to Ireland; that of the total export grade of Ireland, , is with Great Britain and her colonies; and that the balance of trade with each is in favour of Ire. land; whereas in the other seventh the balance is against Irclaşd. And that in the import trade of Ireland, of it

nue.

is with Great Britain and her colonies ; and with each the balance is in favour of Ireland; whereas in the other fourin the balance is against her.

This being the state of the general trade of Ireland with all the world, it must trike every man who reads it, that her prosperity and her wealth depend entirely upon hee intercourse and connexion with Great Britain.

But it is peculiarly necessary, in times like the present, that all the people of this country ihould know this great truth, and that they should be made acquainted, and properly impressed, with the liberality of the British legislature to them, both in their commerce and manufactures, and with the great and important advantages which they have derived therefrom. This, 1, think cannot be done in stronger words than those / uted by Mr. Foster, in 1785. In page sio of Woodfall's debates, he says, “ Britain imports annually from us, 2,500,000l. of our products, all, or very nearly all, duty free, and covenants never to lay a duty on them. We import cbout of 1,000.000l. of her's, and raise a revenue on almost every article of it, and reserve the power of continuing that revea

She exports to us salt for our fisheries and provisions ; Hops, which we cannot grow; Coals, which we cannot " raise; Tin, which we have not; and Bark, which we can" not get elsewhere; and all these without reserving any duty,

or a power to impose any on them; though her own subjects pay 25. 35. or 45. a cha!dr n for her own Coals fent coafiways, and in London 75.'

Again, page 193, he states thus: “ The gentleman (viz. “ Mr. Grattan,) says, England is as dependant on Ireland,

as Ireland is on England; be instances the cotton and other

yarn of Ireland. What! call cotton yarn a fabrick of Ireland, and an export to Britain. It is a mistake of his expreffion, he cannot be so igno-ant of our manufactures. Let

us look into the wants Britain supplies. I will take ccals forft."

Do you think it an object of no consequence to receive " coals from England for ever, duty free, while the duty 012 "s coal in England, brought from one of her own ports to another, is very high. I remember when I proposed a shil" ling a ton on the importation of coals into Dublin only, in order to raise a fund for extending and beautifying the city, " it met with great opposition, I was abused in all the news

papers; yet, now England may raise four times that sum upon the export of her coals, which will

fall upon the con

fumer,

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« fumer, and raise a revenue for her advantage; nay, were

the even to raise the revenue on them to you, that pe does on her own coast carriage, what would become of you

? You have not Irib coals. If the present bounty of 25. a ton to Dublin, added to 15. 8d. duty on Britisb, which

operates as 35. 8d. in favor of Irish coal, will not bring " them, what will you do? because no carriage can be cheap to you as that across the channel."

" Rock-falt is the next,—where will you get it?As to the tanner's trade, where will you get bark? from

no place in the world except England ; we know that it would not bear the freight from any other ; and if England

was to prohibit the export of it, that trade mují be at an end; and we must not forget that the British manufacturers « of leather have already complained, that by getting bark

from Wales, we are enabled to work on as good terms as England.

Let him look to Hops; will this country grow them! « On the other hand, what wants do we supply for England? - Wool and lineri yarn, to our own great advantage; but it is in vain to proceed; the House must see that we are talking of a subject not yet understood; when known, and Ireland

unprejudiced, and in her calm reason, will never rejeft the many blessings it holds out to her trade; it gives wealth and security, which, I trust, will never be refused, from a wild imagination of Utopian republics, commonwealths, « monarchies, -God knows what."

I now refer the reader to the account marked No. 15 in Mr. Irving's returns, and annexed to this work, No. 8, it will appear from this account, that on an average of four years to 1799, we exported from Ireland to Britain of our products and manufactures to the amount of 5,510,825. annually, and that we imported into Ireland, upon the fame average of the products and manufactures of Britain, 2,087,6721. leaving a balance in favour of this country of 3,425,1531. It appears further from the account No. 2, that of the sum of 2,087,6721. fo exported to Ireland, no less a fum than 447,000l. coufilted of articles of the dature of raw materials, such as Allum, Tanner's Bark, Coals, Hops, Rock-falt; &c. many of which are essential to the manufactures of Ireland.

From the account No. 9, it further appears, that the total value of the exports from Ireland into Britain amounted 10 5,612,000l, and that the imports from Britain into

Ireland

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