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taking; because he conceives that any one who would take the trouble to read the translations according to this arrangement, would, if a scholar, be able to recall to his mind every striking word in the original, as he went along; whilst the mere English reader would thus have a somewhat closer idea of the justly celebrated Sapphic Ode'. It is not to be expected that the actual measures of the Latin Sapphics could be used with advantage, if at all, in English rhymes, because the genius of our language would not admit of it: but it is, clearly, proper that all the Sapphic Odes of Horace should be translated in one uniform metre.

Lest any should feel surprised that a Clergyman, engaged in parochial duties, should find time for such exercises, it may be proper to mention, that they formed part of the amusement of an involuntary leisure, caused by a long indisposition.

*

The writer of these translations is aware that the metre of another Ode of Horace (viz. Ode 8, Book i) has, by some, been styled the Second SAPPHIC; but it evidently does not belong to the class of Odes here translated.

Sevenoaks, May, 1845.

Spirat adhuc amor,
Vivuntque commissi calores

Æoliæ fidibus puellæ.” Hor. Lib. IV. Od. 9.

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X. To Licinius

XVI. To Grosphus

BOOK III.

VIII. To Mæcenas

XI. To Mercury

XIV. To the Roman People

XVIII. To Faunus

59

63

69

73

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THE

SAPPHIC ODES OF HORACE.

BOOK I.

Liber I.

ODE II.

AD AUGUSTUM CÆSAREM.

Jam satis terris nivis, atque diræ
Grandinis misit Pater : et rubente
Dexterâ sacras jaculatus arces,

Terruit urbem :

Terruit gentes, grave ne rediret
Sæculum Pyrrhæ nova monstra questæ ;
Omne cum Proteus pecus egit altos

Visere montes :

Piscium et summâ

genus

hæsit ulmo, Nota

quæ sedes fuerat columbis, Et superjecto pavidæ natarunt

Æquore damæ.

Vidimus flavum Tiberim, retortis
Littore Etrusco violenter undis,
Ire dejectum monumenta Regis,

Templaque Vestæ :

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