The Diocese of Meath: Ancient and Modern, Volume 2

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J. F. Fowler, 1867 - Ireland

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Page 28 - Out of every corner of the woods and glens they came creeping forth upon their hands, for their legs could not bear them; they looked like anatomies of death, they spake like ghosts crying out of their graves...
Page 152 - I must do it justice : it was a complete system, full of coherence and consistency ; well digested and well composed in all its parts. It was a machine of wise and elaborate contrivance ; and as well fitted for the oppression, impoverishment, and degradation of a people, and the debasement, in them, of human nature itself, as ever proceeded from the perverted ingenuity of man.
Page 78 - About the years 1652 and 1653," says Colonel Lawrence, in his Interests of Ireland, " the plague and famine had so swept away whole counties, that a man might travel twenty or thirty miles and not see a living creature, either man, or beast, or bird, — they being all dead, or had quitted those desolate places.
Page 14 - They were stoned, they were cut asunder, they were tempted, they were put to death by the sword, they wandered about in sheep-skins, in goat-skins, being in want, distressed, afflicted: of whom the world was not worthy ; wandering in deserts, in mountains, and in dens, and in caves of the earth.
Page 152 - Ildefonso, in the armies of Frederic and in the armies of Maria Theresa. One exile became a Marshal of France. Another became Prime Minister of Spain.
Page 28 - Munster; for, notwithstanding that the same was a most rich and plentiful country, full of corn and cattle, that you would' have thought they should have been able to stand long, yet ere one year and a half they were brought to such wretchedness, as that any stony heart would have rued the same. Out of every corner of the woods and glens they came creeping forth upon their hands, for their legs could not...
Page 42 - ... them, — for the conversion of the just and lawful safeguard, liberties, and rights of Ireland, — and, lastly, for the defence of their own lives, fortunes, lands, and possessions ; — whereas...
Page 9 - A heresy and a new error broke out in England, the effect of pride, vainglory, avarice, sensual desire, and the prevalence of a variety of scientific and philosophical speculations, so that the people of England went into opposition to the Pope and to Rome. " At the same time, they followed a variety of opinions ; and...
Page 30 - The religion of the Papists is superstitious and idolatrous; their faith and doctrine erroneous and heretical, their church in respect rv ss of both apostatical. To give them, therefore, a toleration, or to consent that they may freely exercise their religion, and profess their faith and doctrine is a grievous sin, and that in two respects.
Page 9 - ... so that the people of England went into opposition to the Pope and to Rome. At the same time they followed a variety of opinions, and the old law of Moses, after the manner of the Jewish people ; and they gave the title of Head of the Church of God, in his own realm, to the King. There were enacted by the King and Council new laws and statutes after their own will.

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