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VINDICIÆ HIBERNICÆ:

OR,

IRELAND VINDICATED:

AN ATTEMPT TO DEVELOP AND EXPOSE A FEW OF

THE MULTIFARIOUS ERRORS AND FALSEHOODS

RESPECTING IRELAND,

IN THE HISTORIES OF
MAY, TEMPLE, WHITELOCK, BORLASE, RUSHWORTH,
CLARENDON, COX, CARTE, LELAND, WARNER,

MACAULEY, HUME, AND OTHERS:

PARTICULARLY IN THE LEGENDARY TALES OF
THE CONSPIRACY AND PRETENDED MASSACRE

OF 1641.

BY M. CAREY,
AUTHOR OF ESSAYS ON BANKING, POLITICAL OLIVE BRANCH, &c.

The history of Ireland's unhappy connexion with England, exhibits, from
first to last, a detail of the most persevering, galling, grinding, insulting, and
systematic oppression, to be found any where, except among the Helots of Sparta.
There is not a national feeling that has not been insulted and trodden under
foot; a national right that has not been withheld, until fear forced it from the
grasp of England; or a dear or ancient prejudice that has not been violated,
in that abused country. As Christians, the people of Ireland have been denied,
under penalties and disqualifications, the exercise of the rites of the Catholic
religion, venerable for its antiquity; admirable for its unity; and consecrated by
the belief of some of the best men that ever breathed. As men, they have been
deprived of the common rights of British subjects, under the pretext that
they were incapable of enjoying them: which pretext had no other foundation
than their resistance of oppression, only the more severe by being sanctioned
by the laws. England first denied them the means of improvement; and then
insulted them with the imputation of barbarism.

PAULDING.
" There is but little respite from exasperating oppression and unmerited
cruelty. The eye wanders over a dreary scene of desolation, without a single
point on which it can rest. The heart of the Philanthropist sinks under a
hopeless despondency; and passively yields to the unchristian and impious
reflection, that the poor people of Ireland are a devoted race, whom Provi.
dence has abandoned to the malignant ingenuity of an insatiable enemy.”

LAWLESS.
There is no instance, even in the ten persecutions, of such severity as that
which has been exercised over the Catholics of Ireland.” S. Johnson.

PHILADELPHIA:

PUBLISHED BY M. CAREY AND SON.

le

112508

HARVA

COLLEGE
LIBRARY

EASTERN DISTRICT OF PENNSYLVANIA, TO wit:

BE IT REMEMBERED, That on the sixth day of March, in the (L. S.) forty-third year of the Independence of the United States of America,

A. Ď. 1819, Mathew Carey, of the said District, hath deposited in this office the Title of a Book, the right whereof he claims as Author, in the words following, to wit:

“Vindiciæ Hibernicæ: or, Ireland Vindicated: an Attempt to develop and expose a few of the multifarious Errors and Falsehoods respecting Ireland, in the Histories of May, Temple, Whitelock, Borlase, Rushworth, Clarendon, Cox, Carte, Leland, Warner, Macauley, Hume, and others : particularly in the Legendary Tales of the Conspiracy and Pretended Massacre of 1641. By M. Carey, Author of Essays on Banking, Political Olive Branch, &c.

“The history of Ireland's unhappy connexion with England, exhibits, from first to last, a detail of the most persevering, galling, grinding, insulting, and systematic oppression, to be found any where, except among the Helots of Spurta. There is not a national feeling that has not been insulted and trodden under foot; a national right that has not been withheld, until fear forced it from the grasp of England; or a dear or ancient prejudice that has not been violated, in that abused country. As Christians, the people of Ireland have been denied, under penalties and disqualifications, the exercise of the rites of the Catholic religion, venerable for its antiquity; admirable for its unity; and consecrated by the belief of some of the best men that ever breathed. As men, they have been deprived of the common rights of British subjects, under the pretext that they were incapable of enjoying them : which pretext had no other foundation than their resistance of oppression, only the more severe by being sanctioned by the laws. England first denied them the means of improvement; and then insulted them with the imputation of barbarism.'

PAULDING. "There is but little respite from exasperating oppression and unmerited cruelty. The eye wanders over a dreary scene of desolation, without a single point on which it can rest. The heart of the Philanthropist sinks under a hopeless despondency; and passively yields to the unchristian and impious reflection, that the poor people of Ireland are a devoted race, whom Provi. dence bas abandoned to the malignant ingenuity of an insatiable enemy.'

LAWLESS. "There is no instance, even in the ten persecutions, of such severity as that which has been exercised over the Catholics of Ireland.' S. Johnson."

In conformity to the Act of the Congress of the United States, intituled, “An Act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned.” And also to the Act, entitled, “An Act supple. mentary to an Act, entitled, 'An Act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books, to the authors and proprie. tors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned,' and extending the benefits thereof to the arts of designing, engraving, and etching historical and other prints."

D. CALDWELL, Clerk of the

Eastern District of Pennsylvania.

2011

49.23 4

LYDIA R. BAILEY, PRINTEU.

TO

THOSE SUPERIOR SPIRITS,

WHO SCORN THE YOKE OF

FRAUD, IMPOSTURE, BIGOTRY, AND DELUSION;

WHO,

AT THE SACRED SHRINE OF TRUTH,

WILL OFFER UP THEIR PREJUDICES,

HOW INVETERATE SOEVER,

WHEN HER BRIGHT TORCH ILLUMINATES THEIR MINDS ;

WHO,

POSSESSING THE INESTIMABLE BLESSINGS

OF

THRICE-HOLY AND REVERED LIBERTY,

ACQUIRED BY AN ARDUOUS STRUGGLE AGAINST

A MERE INCIPIENT DESPOTISM,

WILL SYMPATHIZE WITH THOSE

WHO CONTENDED ARDENTLY, ALTHOUGH UNSUCCESSFULLY,

AGAINST AS GRIEVOUS AN OPPRESSION

AS EVER PRESSED TO THE EARTH

A NOBLE AND GENEROUS NATION,

WHICH EMBARKED IN THE SAME GLORIOUS CAUSE

AS LEONIDAS, EPAMINONDAS, BRUTUS, THE PRINCE

OF ORANGE, WILLIAM TELL, FAYETTE,
HANCOCK, ADAMS, FRANKLIN,

AND WASHINGTON,
THIS WORK IS DEDICATED.

IT IS LIKEWISE DEDICATED TO

THE IMMORTAL MEMORY OF

THE DESMONDS, THE O'NIALS, THE O'DONNELS, THE

o'MOORES, THE PRESTONS, THE MOUNTGARRETS,

THE CASTLEHAVENS, THE FITZGERALDS,

THE SHEARESES, THE TONES,

THE EMMETTS,

AND

THE MYRIADS OF ILLUSTRIOUS IRISHMEN,

WHO SACRIFICED LIFE OR FORTUNE,

IN THE UNSUCCESSFUL EFFORT TO EMANCIPATE A COUNTRY

ENDOWED BY HEAVEN

WITH AS MANY AND AS CHOICE BLESSINGS

AS ANY PART OF THE TERRAQUEOUS GLOBE,

BUT, FOR AGES, A HOPELESS AND HELPLESS VICTIM

TO A FORM OF GOVERNMENT

TRANSCENDENTLY PERNICIOUS.

Philadelphia, March 6, 1819.

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To enable any reader, who may feel so disposed, to verify the facts and quota.

tions in this work, I annex a List of the Authors, with the dates of the several editions. Having, to avoid encumbering the bottoms of the pages with tedious repetitions of the titles of works, generally referred to the author's names, this list furnishes a key to the references.

Burke. Works of the Right Hon. Edmund Burke. 6 vols. 8vo. Boston, 1807.
Borlase. History of the Execrable Irish Rebellion. Folio. London, 1680.
Burnet. Bishop Burnet's History of His Own Times. 2 vols. folio. London,

1724.
Burton. History of the Kingdom of Ireland. By R. Burton. Westminster,

1811.
Baker. Chronicles of the Kings of England. Folio. London, 1670.
Carleton. A Thankful Remembrance of God's Mercy. By George, Bishop of

Chichester. 8vo. London, 1630.
Cabala Cabala : Sive Scrinia Sacra, Mysteries of State and Government.

Folio. London, 1683.
Curry. An Historical and Critical Review of the Civil Wars in Ireland.

By John Curry, M. D. 2 vols. 8vo. Dublin, 1786.
Clarendon. History of the Rebellion and Civil Wars in England. By the

Earl of Clarendon. 6 vols. 8vo. Oxford, 1707.
Clarendon': I. History of the Rebellion and Civil Wars of Ireland. By the

Earl of Clarendon. 8vo. London, 1720.
Clarendon's S. P. State Papers. By the Earl of Clarendon. 2 vols. folio.

Oxford, 1773.
Crawford. History of Ireland, from the Earliest Period to the Present Time.

By William Crawford. 2 vols. 8vo. Strabane, 1783.
Carte. History of the Life of James, Duke of Ormond. 3 vols. folio. London,

1736.
Cor. Hibernia Anglicana: or the History of Ireland. By Richard Cox, Esqr.

London, 1689
Davies. Historical Tracts. By Sir John Davies, Attorney-General in Ireland.

8vo. Dublin, 1787.
Daniel. The Collection of the History of England. By Samuel Daniel. Folio.

London, 1650.
Derry. Irish Historical Library. By William, Lord Bishop of Derry. 8vo.

Dublin, 1724.
Esser. Letters written by His Excellency Arthur Capel, Earl of Essex, Lord

Lieutenant of Ireland. 4to. London, 1770.
Frankland. Annals of King James and Charles I. Folio. London, 1681.
Gordon. History of Ireland, from the earliest Accounts to the Union. By the

Rev. James Gordon. 2 vols. 8vo. London, 1806.
Hibernica. Harris's Hibernica: or, Some Ancient Pieces respecting Ireland.

8vo. Dublin, 1770.
Harris. History and Antiquities of the City of Dublin. By William Harris.

8vo. London, 1776.
Hollinshed. Chronicles of England, Ireland, and Scotland. 6 vols. 4to. Lon.

don, 1807
Hume. History of England. By David Hume. 6 vols. 8vo. Albany, 1816.
Theme': E. Hume's Essays. 2 vols. 8vo. Philadelphia, 1817.
Journals. Journals of the House of Commons of England. Folio.

The Irish Journals are referred to in page 159.

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