Vindicię Hibernicę: Or, Ireland Vindicated:: An Attempt to Develop and Expose a Few of the Multifarious Errors and Falsehoods Respecting Ireland, in the Histories of May, Temple, Whitelock, Borlase, Rushworth, Clarendon, Cox, Carte, Leland, Warner, Macauley, Hume, and Others: Particularly in the Legendary Tales of the Conspiracy and Pretended Massacre of 1641

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M. Carey and Son., 1819 - Ireland - 500 pages

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Page 499 - Then shall he say also unto them on the left hand, Depart from me ye cursed into everlasting fire, prepared for the devil and his angels; for I was an hungered and ye gave me no meat ; I was thirsty and ye gave me no drink ; I was a stranger and ye took me not in ; naked and ye clothed me not ; sick, and in prison, and ye visited me not.
Page 386 - But that I am forbid To tell the secrets of my prison-house, I could a tale unfold whose lightest word Would harrow up thy soul, freeze thy young blood, Make thy two eyes, like stars, start from their spheres, Thy knotted and combined locks to part And each particular hair to stand on end, Like quills upon the fretful porcupine : But this eternal blazon must not be To ears of flesh and blood.
Page 477 - His country's curse, his children's shame. Outcast of virtue, peace, and fame. May he, at last, with lips of flame On the parch'd desert thirsting die, — While lakes that shone in mockery nigh...
Page 476 - Oh for a tongue to curse the slave, Whose treason, like a deadly blight, Comes o'er the councils of the brave, And blasts them in their hour of might!
Page 473 - mend his native country, lamentably tattered both in the upper-leather and sole, with all the honest stitches he can take ; and as willing never to be paid for his work by old English wonted pay. It is his trade to patch all the year long gratis. Therefore I pray gentlemen keep your purses. By Theodore de la Guard.
Page 66 - Out of every corner of the woods and glens they came creeping forth upon their hands, for their legs could not bear them; they looked like anatomies of death ; they spake like ghosts crying out of their graves...
Page 504 - Rebellion ! foul, dishonouring word, Whose wrongful blight so oft has stain'd The holiest cause that tongue or sword Of mortal ever lost or gain'd. How many a spirit, born to bless, Hath sunk beneath that withering name, Whom but a day's, an hour's success Had wafted to eternal fame...
Page 379 - That it is fit that his lordship do endeavour with his majesty's forces to wound, kill, slay, and destroy, by all the ways and means he may, all the said rebels, and their adherents and relievers ; and burn, spoil, waste, consume, destroy, and demolish, all the places, towns, and houses, where the said rebels are, or have been, relieved and harboured, and all the hay and corn there ; and kill and destroy all the men there inhabiting able to bear arms.'!!.
Page vii - I must do it justice : it was a complete system, full of coherence and consistency ; well digested and well composed in all its parts. It was a machine of wise and elaborate contrivance ; and as well fitted for the oppression, impoverishment, and degradation of a people, and the debasement, in them, of human nature itself, as ever proceeded from the perverted ingenuity of man.
Page 66 - Woe to them that devise iniquity, and work evil upon their beds ! when the morning is light, they practise it, because it is in the power of their hand. And they covet fields, and take them by violence; and houses, and take them away : so they oppress a man and his house, even a man and his heritage.

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