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At Nocton, Lincolnshire, aged 20, Edward, twin son of the Rev. Edward Wilson, M.A., Vicar of that parish.

At his residence, Hornton-st., Kensington, aged 60, Peter Smith, esq.

Dec. 5. At St. Clairtown Bank, Fifeshire, James Bogie, esq., of Balbie.

At Brighton, aged 74, Frederick Nash, esq., member of the Old Society of Painters in Watercolours.

At Poole, aged 37, Ann Strong Stevenson, wife of c. Keats, esq., and dau. of the late Win. Adey, esq.

Dec. 6. At County-terrace, Camberwell, aged 67, Stephen Westbrook, esq., late proprietor and editor of the “Oxford Chronicle."

At Witton-house, North wich, Cheshire, aged 80, Frances, relict of the Rev. William Yates, Rector of Eccleston, near Chorley, Lancashire.

At New Bridge-st., Blackfriars, aged 74, Ann, wife of Mr. Thomas Masters, publisher of “ Bell's Weekly Messenger."

Dee. 7. At the Elms, Shirley, near Southampton, Mary, eldest dau. of Henry Grimes, esq., late of Coton-house, Warwickshire.

Dec. 8. At Greenwood, Hants, aged 35, W. H. West, esq., Ist Madras Fusiliers, fourth son of

Lieut.-Col. West, late Scotch Fusilier Guards, and grandson of the late Lieut.-Col. West of the same Reg., and Lieut.-Governor of Landguard Fort.

At Pulteney-st., aged 64, Capt. Robert Stuart, R.N.

Dec. 9. At Queen Anne-st., Cavendish-sq., aged 69, Maj.-Gen. Sir Archibald Chalmer, R.A.

At Isleworth, aged 73, William Mount, esq., formerly of Leytonstone.

Dec. 10. At Gadlys, Aberdare, South Wales, aged 63, George Rowland Morgan, esq., J. P. for the county of Glamorgan.

Dec, Il. In London, aged 42, Wm. Frederick Lewis, esq., one of the Puisne Judges of the Supreme Court of Jamaica, second son of the late James Lewis, esq., Commissioner of Slave Compensation.

Dec. 12. The Lord Almaric Athelstan Spencer Churchill, son of his Grace the Duke of Marlborough, by the Hon. Charlotte Augusta Flower, second Duchess of Marlborough.

At Fulham, aged 77, John Waller, esq., late cashier in the office of Woods and Forests.

Dec. 13. At Springwood-house, near Huddersfield, aged 64, John Starkey, esq.

At Cumberland-st., Warwick-sq., aged 47, Capt. H. Murrey E. Allen, R.N.

TABLE OF MORTALITY IN THE DISTRICTS OF LONDON.
(From the Returns issued by the Registrar-General.)
Deaths Registered.

Births Registered.

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605 | 43 10 | 25 6 | 402 | 42 8 | 409

PRICE OF HAY AND STRAW AT SMITHFIELD.
Hay, 31. 8s. to 31. 128.-Straw, 11. 4s. to 11. 8s.-Clover, 31. 108. to 51.

NEW METROPOLITAN CATTLE-MARKET.

To sink the Offal—per stone of 8lbs. Beef

.3s. 6d. to 58. 2d. Head of Cattle at Market, Dec. 15. Mutton .As. 4d. to 58. 6d. Beasts.

6,748 Veal 4s. 41. to 56. 4d. Sheep

16,090 Pork .4s. 2d. to 5s. 2d. Calves ..

172 Lamb...

Pigs....

320
COAL-MARKET, Dec. 20.
Wallsend, &c. 198. per ton. Other sorts, 15s. to 16s. 6d.
TALLOW, per cwt.—Town Tallow, 59s. 6d.

P. Y. C., 59s, 3d.
HOPS.-Best Kent 31. 10s. to 51. 58.--Sussex, 21. 16s. to 31. 15s.
WOOL, Down Tegs, per lb. 17 d. to 184d. Leicester Fleeces, 16d. to 17d.

Combings, 12d. to 16d.

124 METEOROLOGICAL DIARY, BY H. GOULD, late W. CARY, 181, STRAND.

From Nov. 24 to Dec. 23, 1856, both inclusive. Fahrenheit's Therm.

Fahrenheit's Therm.

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49 29, 76 fair, rain
37 60 do. cloudy 10
42 50 snow, rain 11
37 , 56 eldy. rain, fair 12
40 ,55 cloudy, rain 13
29 54 do, do.

14
30 62 cloudy, fair 15
30 70 do. do.

16 30 85 do. do. rain 17 32 80 do. snow 18 30 72 rain, snow 19 40 81 fogly, rain 20 56 70 rain, cloudy 21

57 eldy. rain, fair 22 54 42 do. do, do. 23

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54 29, 34 cldy. rain, fair 51 34 rain, cloudy 48 , 38 cloudy, rain 45 29 do. fair

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EDWARD AND ALFRED WHITMORE,

Stock and Share Brokers,

17, Change Alley, London. PRINTED BY MESSAS. JOHN HENRY AND JANES PARKER.

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204

MINOR CORRESPONDENCE.-John Britton, Esq.-Tolling of the Great Bell of St. Paul's
The House of Lords in 1857
History and Antiquities of Boston, Lincolnshire. (Second Notice)
Autobiography of Sylvanus Urban. Chap. VII.
Coleridge's Lectures on Shakespeare and Milton .....
The Early Flemish Painters
Monarchs Retired from Business
Boswell's Letters .......
John Britton
The Southern Counties in the Olden Time
CORRESPONDENCE OF SYLVANUS URBAN.—The Beauchamp Tower, 196 ; Gresham

College, 199; Genealogy of the Stuart and Douglas families, 200; Decimal Coinage,
202 ; Proposed Monument to the Wiltshire Aniiquaries, Aubrey and Britton; Old

Monument at Braithwell, 203; The Meade family
HISTORICAL AND MISCELLANEOUS REVIEWS. – Alfieri and Goldoni, 205 ; Sir

Joshua Reynolds and his Works, 208 ; Ivors, 210; Cheever's Lectures on Cowper,
211; Immortelles from Charles Dickens-Fletcher's Cloud Shadows — Cumming's
Argument for the Bible-Green on Biblical Criticisin-Harmony of the Gospels-
Bagster's Paragraph Bible--Biber's Plea, 212; Anderson's Ladies of the Reformation
- Mind's Mirror- Jardine's Gunpowder Plot, 213; Goti hold's Emblems-Timbs' Cu-
riosities of History-Head's Shall and will - Gosse's “Life”--Courthope's Historic
Peerage, 214; Lodge's Peerage ---Dod's Peerage-Dod's Parliamentary Companion-
Head's Descriptive Essays-Review of the Divorce Bill-Carlyon's Early Years and

Late Reflections-St. Anselm's Meditations—The Great Law of the Human Mind
ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. - Society of Antiquaries, 216; British Archæological

Association, 218; Archæological Institute, 220 ; Yorkshire Philosophical Society........
THE MONTHLY INTELLIGENCER
Promotions and Preferments
OBITUARY ; with Memoirs of the Duke of Rutland, 235; The Marquis of Queensberry-Lord

Milford -- Sir Hugh Richard Hoare, Bart. - General Milman, 238; Rear-Admiral
Rogers-Joseph Brotherton, M.P., 239; Lord Bishop of Cork, Cloyne, and Ross—Rev.
Ralph Ta ham - Rev. Dr. Harris, 240; Rev. Thomas Bowdler, 241; Dr. Ure, 242; Mr.

Hugh Mi ler, 244; William Ruff, Esq.
CLERGY DECEASED
DEATHS, arranged in Chronological Order
Registrar-General's Return of Mortality in the Metropolis, Markets, 255; Meteorological

Diary-Daily Price of Stocks

215

222 223

235

246 247 248

256

BY SYLVANUS URBAN, GENT.

MINOR CORRESPONDENCE.

JOHN BRITTON, Esq., F.S.A. “No one,” he says, “until very lately, has

questioned the propriety of placing public memoMR. URBAN, -It might have been ex. rials within the walls of churches; but we know pected that some memorial of a higher

that these sacred spots and honorary privileges character than a mere “tablet” would

have been most woefully misused, and eren dis

graced, on too many occasions. A respected friend have been proposed as a record of the late has (in a recent work) agitated this subject. He Mr. Britton's name and services. Salis- most justly reprobates all the vulgar and tastebury Cathedral has been selected, very pro

less slabs, sculpture, and inscriptions that have

too long defaced the architectural beauties of perly, to receive this memorial, but I would Christian temples."— Appeal for the Restoration suggest that, instead of a tablet, an altar- of Redclif' Church, 18-12, p. 20. sercen should be erected to supply what is

In Winchester Cathedral now so palpably wanting. The good example which has recently

“There are several slabs and monuments in

serted in and attached to the walls, and which been afforded at Ely, where a costly memo- are not only injurious to the effect of the whole, rial has been rendered subservient to this but some are destructive of the architecture. sacred purpose, would thus be followed,

" It is much to be regretted," Britton continues,

" that our venerable and noble cathedrals should and the proportions of the beautiful build- have been disgraced and distigured by petiy ing in question would be restored.

monumental tablets, often ruinous to the stabiIt is needless now to speak of the mis

lity of buildings."--History of Winchester Ca

thedral, p. 79. deeds which were perpetrated at Salisbury, at great cost, and doubtless with the best May we not hope that the proposition intentions, in the days of Bishop Barring- submitted to the Royal Institute of British ton. But no one can enter Salisbury Ca- Architects, on the 12th inst., to erect a thedral without being struck at once with tablet to Britton's memory, in Salisbury the absence of an altar-screen-the cus- Cathedral, will be at once withdrawn, and tomary and fitting termination of a choir a more satisfactory memorial substituted. —and without feeling a strong wish that

J, H. MARKLAND. it should be supplied.

The screen would, of course, be attached Bath, Jan. 1857. to the columns supporting the three beautiful eastern arches, and one act of ruthless

TOLLING OF THE GREAT BELL destruction would thus be repaired. The

OF ST. PAUL'S. name of Britton, and the occasion which gave rise to this memorial, might be re

Mr. URBAN,- In the programme, pubcorded on a brass-plate at the back of the

lished by the cathedral authorities, for the screen.

installation of the present Bishop of LonIf this proposal should not meet the views

don (Dr. Tait), it is announced that during of those who seek to do honour to his the progress of the procession from the memory, another appropriate memorial chapter-house to the cathedral, “the great

bell will be tolled.” Now I, as one of the might be selected. One of the windows in the Chapter-house might be filled with public, have been led to believe (probably painted glass, and be treated as

a popular error) that the "great bell” is rial window ;” thus added beauty would

tolled only upon the death of a member of be imparted to that exquisite structure,

the royal family, the bishop of the diocese, and the plan of those who are engaged in

or the lord mayor during his mayoralty. its restoration would be further carried

That it should be tolled for a bishop still out.

in esse, though officially defunct, is neverWith respect to a tablet, I must add a theless an anomaly which perhaps you can few words, not only from my own long. reconcile. cherished dislike to that most unmeaning,

Was it typical of this abnegation, abro. idle form of sepulchral memorial, but that gation, or divesture of the official existBritton's friends and admirers ay be fully

ence of the late diocesan, indicating that aware of the strong opinions which he “Othello's occupation's done ?" himself entertained on this subject:

Yours, &c., Civis.

a memo

THE

GENTLEMAN'S MAGAZINE

AND

HISTORICAL REVIEW.

THE HOUSE OF LORDS IN 1857. The younger members of the House of Peers must regard with peculiar satisfaction the consideration which this exalted branch of the legislature at present enjoys in popular estimation, and the influence which it exercises upon public opinion. The veteran statesmen and great debaters of the upper chamber were always sure of an audience as often as they chose to address the House and the country. When Lord Lyndhurst reviewed a Whig session, or the Great Duke solemnly advised their lordships to agree to the repeal of the Corn-laws, every tone and syllable vibrated through the land. But these great occasions were comparatively rare, and their lordships seemed tacitly to recognise the inferior and secondary rôle in public affairs which they were condemned to fill.

About the time, however, when the present century, if it had been a German Benedict, would have been keeping its golden wedding, a few young peers began to be dissatisfied with the position which their order occupied in the political world. They found their college contemporaries in the other House occupying a large share of public attention. Their speeches were in all the newspapers ; they were attacked or praised in leading articles; they were regarded by this or that party as men of promise; and were, in short, bringing their talents to bear upon the political instruction of their countrymen. Our young noblemen likewise felt the stirrings of a noble ambition. They, too, longed for a share of fame and influence, and were half-disposed to regret that the accident of birth had removed them from a chamber in which almost all political power and influence seemed to be centred. They took counsel together: they visited the reporters' gallery. Having satisfied themselves that, in the first place, they could not be heard, they sought for suggestions from the representatives of the press, and took Sir Charles Barry into the conclave. The gallery was brought nearer to the speakers. Still the result was unsatisfactory, and still the young peers persevered. What they did and whom they consulted are matters which probably belong to the secret history of the period. At length they received a hint from an influential quarter, that if they tried the experiment of making good speeches, they would most likely receive the same attention that was given to similar speeches in the Lower House. The advice was judicious, and the prophecy sound. The picture was better painted when the limner took more pains. The arts of oratory suited to a hall of oratory began to be cultivated. Voices rose, or attempted to rise, to the true oratorical pitch, and the complaints against Sir C. Barry began to subside. Slip-shod

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