The Life and Public Services of Hon. Samuel J. Tilden: Democratic Nominee for President of the United States : to which is Added a Sketch of the Life of Hon. Thomas A. Hendricks, Democratic Nominee for Vice-president

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D. Appleton, 1876 - New York (State) - 434 pages
 

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Page 225 - It shall be the duty of the Legislature to provide for the organization of cities and incorporated villages, and to restrict their power of taxation, assessment, borrowing money, contracting debts, and loaning their credit, so as to prevent abuses in assessments and in contracting debt by such municipal corporations...
Page 193 - All contracts for work or materials on any canal shall be made with the persons who shall offer to .do or provide the same at the lowest price, with adequate security for their performance. No extra compensation shall be made to any contractor; but if, from any unforeseen cause, the terms of any contract shall prove to be unjust and oppressive, the Canal Board may, upon the application of the contractor, cancel such contract.
Page 342 - For the Democracy of the whole country we do here reaffirm our faith in the permanence of the federal union, our devotion to the constitution of the United States, with its amendments universally accepted, as a final settlement of the controversies that engendered civil war, and do here record our steadfast confidence in the perpetuity of republican self-government.
Page 49 - ... ]N"o such law shall take effect until it shall, at a general election, have been submitted to the people, and have received a majority of all the votes cast for and against it at such election.
Page 333 - REFORM IS NECESSARY even more in the higher grades of the public service. President, vice-president, judges, senators, representatives, cabinet officers, — these and all others in authority are the people's servants. Their offices are not a private perquisite ; they are a public trust.
Page 331 - It prohibits imports that might purchase the products of American labor. It has degraded American commerce from the first to an inferior rank on the high seas. It has cut down the sales of American manufactures at home and abroad, and depleted the returns of American agriculture — an industry followed by half our people. It costs the people five times more than it produces to the Treasury, obstructs the process of production, and wastes tlie fruits of labor. It promotes fraud, fosters smuggling,...
Page 331 - Reform is necessary in the scale of public expense, — Federal, State, and municipal. Our Federal taxation has swollen from sixty millions gold, in 1860, to...
Page 314 - ... resumption, no preparation for resumption, but instead has obstructed resumption, by wasting our resources and exhausting all our surplus income; and, while annually professing to intend a speedy return to specie payments, has annually enacted fresh hindrances thereto. As such hindrance we denounce the resumption clause of the act of 1875 and we here demand its repeal.
Page 401 - An act to authorize the refunding of the national debt," with like qualities, privileges, and exemptions, to the extent necessary ' to carry this act into full effect, and to use the proceeds thereof for the purposes aforesaid.
Page 333 - Attorney-General misappropriating public funds: a Secretary of the Navy enriched or enriching friends by percentages levied off the profits of contractors with his department: an ambassador to England censured in a dishonorable speculation; the President's private secretary barely escaping conviction upon trial for guilty complicity in frauds upon the revenue; a Secretary of War impeached for high crimes and misdemeanors...

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