The American and English Encyclopedia of Law, Volume 3

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John Houston Merrill, Charles Frederic Williams, Thomas Johnson Michie, David Shephard Garland
E. Thompson, 1887 - Law
 

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Page 121 - I mean stock to remain in this country, to the United States of America, to found at Washington, under the name of the Smithsonian Institution, an establishment for the increase and diffusion of knowledge among men.
Page 22 - The testimony in equity cases shall be taken in like manner as in cases at law; and, except as herein otherwise provided, the Legislature shall have the same power to alter and regulate the jurisdiction and proceedings in law and in equity that it has heretofore exercised.
Page 21 - This clause enables the judicial department to receive jurisdiction to the full extent of the constitution, laws, and treaties of the United States, when any question respecting them shall assume such a form that the judicial power is capable of acting on it.
Page 272 - It is that state of the case, which, after the entire comparison and consideration of all the evidence, leaves the minds of the jurors in that condition that they cannot say they feel an abiding conviction, to a moral certainty, of the truth of the charge.
Page 340 - This partnership or community consists of the profits of all the effects of which the husband has the administration and enjoyment, either of right or in fact, of the produce of the reciprocal industry and labor of both husband and wife, and of the estates which they may acquire during the marriage, either by donations made jointly to them both, or by purchase, or in any other similar way, even although the purchase be only in the name of one of the two and not of both, because in that case the period...
Page 115 - A charity, in the legal sense, may be more fully defined as a gift, to be applied consistently with existing laws, for the benefit of an indefinite number of persons, either by bringing their minds or hearts under the influence of education or religion, by relieving their bodies from disease, suffering, or constraint, by assisting them to establish themselves in life, or by erecting or maintaining public buildings or works, or otherwise lessening the burdens of government.
Page 437 - . . . a confession, in order to be admissible, must be free and voluntary: that is, must not be extracted by any sort of threats or violence, nor obtained by any direct or implied promises, however slight, nor by the exertion of any improper influence.
Page 115 - Case, 41 defined a charitable or pious gift to be 'whatever is given for the love of God, or for the love of your neighbor, in the catholic and universal sense, — given from these motives and to these ends, — free from the stain or taint of every consideration that is personal, private, or selfish.
Page 243 - Invested the citizens of the United States with a new constitutional right which is within the protecting power of Congress. That right Is exemption from discrimination in the exercise of the elective franchise, on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.
Page 294 - ... no devise in writing of lands, tenements or hereditaments, or any clause thereof, shall be revocable, otherwise than by some other will or codicil in writing, or other writing declaring the same...

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