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Cornwall

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1449-1471

1472-1484. Resigd

being blind and

infirm. 1484-1511

1511-1521

Yorkshire

• After De Ferings, Nicholas Butler, bishop elect,

NO.

MODE OF APPOINTMENT.

FORMER OFFICES.

13

By provision of Pope Boniface

VIII.

Dominican friar. Twice Provincial of

that order in England, and then am

bassador at Rome from Ed. I. (326) Archdeacon of Canterbury. (327)

Was nominated by the pope and

got provisors, but confirmed by

the king 15 Succeeded by favour of Edward

II., the pope confirming 16 Elected, with approval of the

king; and at last confirmed by

provision of Pope John XXI. 17 Advanced by papal provision. 18 Succeeded by pope's provision 19 By provision of Pope Gregory

II. Avignon 20 Translated by papal bull; after

wards made archbp. of York 21 Advanced by Richard II. with

consent of the pope 22 Appointed by King Richard II. .

Almoner to King Edward Il. (329) Prebendary of Maynooth, and then

Treasurer of Ireland. (330) Canon of Dublin.

(332) Prebendary of Malaghidert, &c. (333) Dr. of Civil and Canon Law, Oxford,

and for a time Fellow of Merton College.

(ib.) Bishop of Aire in Gascony, and pre

viously Divinity Professor at Toulouse.

(334) Bishop of Ossory, and previously Car

melite friar of London. (336) D.D., Fellow of Merton College, War.

den of New College, and for a time Chancr. of the University of Oxford.

(ib.) (Precentor of Hereford, MS.n.t) Privy

Councillor, twice Justice of Ireland, once Chancellor.

23

24

By papal provision

(339) D.D. Oxford, Governor of the College

of Caen in Normandy, founded by Henry V.

(ib.) Abbot of Osney, near Oxford. (341)

25 (Was adorned with pall, 1472)

26 By provision of Pope Sixtus IV.,

confirmed by the king's pardon 27 Translated by Pope Julius II.

B.C.C.L. Chantor of St. Patrick's,
Dublin.

(343) Made Bishop of Meath by Pope Julius

II., 1507, Privy Councillor to Henry VIII., Chancellor of Ireland about 1515.

(345)

held the temporalities four years in dispute.

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[N. B.-The Regal Supremacy having been by this time fully established in the Irish Church, it is unnecessary to specify any further the mode of appointment of the successors to the see.]

33. Thomas Jones, 1605—1619, of Lancashire; Bishop of Meath. (H. 354) 34. Lancelot Bulkeley, 1619–1650, Anglesey ; Archdeacon of Dublin. (355)

(See vacant for ten years.) 35. James Margetson, 1660—1663, Resigned; Treasurer of St. Patrick's, Dublin ; afterwards Archbishop of Armagh ; Dean of Christ Church, Dublin ; educated at Cambridge.

(357) 36. Michael Boyle, 1663–1678, resigned ; an Irishman; Bishop of Cork, Cloyne, and Ross; afterwards Archbishop of Armagh.

(ib.) 37. John Parker, 1678–1681 ; Archbishop of Tuam.

(ib.) 38. Francis Marsh, 1681-1693; Bishop of Kilmore and Ardagh. (358)

39. Narcissus Marsh, 1694-1702, resigned ; Archbishop of Cashel ; afterwards of Armagh.

(ib.) 40. William King, 1702–1729; Antrim ; Bishop of Derry.

(366) 41. John Hoadly, 1729–1743, Resigned; afterwards Archbishop of Armagh ; previously Archdeacon of Salisbury.

(369, 452) 42. Charles Cobbe, 1743–1765 ; Bishop of Kildare.

(MS. C.) 43. William Carmichael, 1765 Ob. eod. , Bishop of Meath.

(ib.) 44. Arthur Smyth, 1766-1771; Bishop of Meath.

(ib.) 45. John Cradock, 1772—1778; Bishop of Kilmore.

(ib.)

NO.

MODE OP APPOINTMENT.

FORMER OFFICES.

28 | By designation of the pope Bishop of Meath, successor to Rokeby,

Chancellor of Ireland, 1527, previously Fellow of New College, D.D. and enjoyed several successive promotions in England.

(346) 29 Appointed by interest of Cardi- D.D., Treasurer of St. Paul's, Lonnal Wolsey

don, M.A. Cambridge, Chaplain to Cardinal Wolsey.

(ib.) 30 Advanced by King Henry VIII. D.D., of Augustin Friars, and Pro

vincial of that order in London.

(348) 31 Advanced by Queen Mary, with Dean of Hereford and Archdeacon of sanction of the pope

Oxford.

(352) 32 Promoted by Queen Elizabeth Chaplain to Sussex and Queen Eliza

beth, Rector of Painstown. (353)

46. Robert Fowler, 1778–1801 ; of Trinity College, Cambridge; Bishop of Killaloe.

(ib.) 47. Charles Agar, 1801-1809; Archbishop of Cashel.

(ib.) 48. Euseby Cleaver, 1809—1820 ; Bishop of Ferns.

(ib.) 49. John G. Beresford, 1820-1822, Resigned ; Bishop of Clogher. 50. William Magee, 1822-1831. 51. Richard Whately, 1831 ; Principal of St. Alban's Hall, Oxford.

+ MS. notes in a copy of Harris's Ware in the Library of Trinity College, Dublin, purchased at the sale of the late Austin Cooper, with MS. additions by that gentleman from various sources, as stated by him in an entry dated April, 1806.

Fitz Simon joined with the Earl of Kildare in the Rebellion against King Henry Vil in behalf of Lambert Simnel, was instrumental in crowning that impostor, and in 1488(a) among others, had his pardon. The petition and submission () of Jenico Merks, Mayor of Dublin, and other citizens in 1487 to king Henry VII. explain this particular, as they also excuse Octavian de Palatio, Archbishop of Armagh. * We were daunted," say they, “ not only to see your chief governour, whom your Highness made ruler over us, to bend or bow to that idol, whom they made us to obey ; but also our Father of Dublin, and most of the Clergy of this nation, excepting the Rev. Father his Grace Octavianus Archbishop of Armagh.'

(a) Edgecumbe's Voyage, MS. (vid. Harris's Hibernica.]

0) Ware's MS. extracts from the records of the city of Dublin, (quoted in Harris's Ware, 343).

Historical [It may be satisfactory for the unlearned account of

reader that we should add in this place a somethe proceedings con- what more particular notice of the circumstances L. Simnel's connected with the rebellion of this Lambert

Simnel than it was found convenient to give in the text at p. 666 sup. For the details connected with this matter which are here subjoined, we are indebted principally to Stuart's History of Armagh.

bellion.

State of pub

(Stuart, p. 204.) The adherents of the York family, lic feeling Henry VII. having no hereditary claim on the throne, in Ireland were ready to join in any plan for his overthrow, esperelative to cially seeing how contemptuously they were treated by of York and him. In Ireland the people were hostile to the house of Lancaster. Lancaster, and the Earl of Kildare, the Lord Deputy, had

proved himself a zealous and powerful friend of the late King Edward. Henry therefore commanded him by letters, in the year 1486 to repair to England. But Kil. dare got the lords of the realm to state to his Majesty that his departure might be very prejudicial to some affairs of high moment to the country then in actual progress through parliament, and to pray that he might be suffered to remain till the conclusion of the business. Among the clergy who signed these letters to the king, were Octavian Archbishop of Armagh, and Fitz Simmons Archbishop of Dublin ; and so Kildare stayed, hop

ing eventually to serve the house of York. Simnel's Meanwhile Richard Symon or Simons, an Oxford origin and priest, had instructed Lambert Simnel, a comely boy of scheme for low rank, to personate Edward Plantagenet, Earl of advance

Warwick, (only son of George Duke of Clarence, brother

the late King Edward,) who was imprisoned in the

ment.

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