Manual of Classical Literature

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E.C. Biddle, 1855 - Art - 690 pages
 

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Contents

Grecian Literature p 339357
22
the ancient Brusa Cf P I 160
27
countries of Europe 2931 Hispania Interior Atlantis
32
Sphia c Cf P I 177 P II 117 96
33
j Color
39
Power of the kings 35 Their retinue pagus D 109 Athenian courts of justice
41
mon Latin form of some of the names
44
Their armies how composed V 44 121 Spartan slaves 5122 The kings
46
made before the Deluge 57 Effects of 00 4560 45 Letters introduced
47
Rome 51 52 Gales and roads 53 INTRODUCTION TO CLASSICAL CHRONO
51
meals 53 Social repasts ý 54 Dress of Ætolia and Achaia
55
Picturewriting by Mexicans N
56
ferences to writers on the topography
57
L
58
ticed by the youth in the course of educa
59
References to works on Greek inscriptions
63
the cradle of the sciences 29 High cul the author under the present head of
65
Dwellings 071 Villas
66
to give a fabulous character to early tradi Roma V 91 Terminus Priapus
92
most common use among the Greeks Literature p 370377
97
urbs 7275 Thracia 76 Four na divisions of time day month and year
99
and Roman system of classifying their gods
101
and Romans Abode of the gods 512 Graces 105 Hours 106 Fates
107
gods p 113124
113
class 69 70 Cælus 57172 Sol or Hercules 125 126 Theseus 127
127
Poetry originally connected with music 09 129147 129 Time when writers
130
lius 73 Luna V 74 75 Aurora 76 Nox Jason and the Argonauts 5129 Castor
133
Employments of women 0 60 Amuse
136
Iliac Table 0 2226 Lyric poetry 0 27 0 134 Hephæstion 135 Apollonius
137
GRECIAN ANTIQUITIES
141
The divisions of the army V
142
Erotic 0 34 The Epigram 350 139 Harpocration 140 Hesychius
143
Salyre N 45 Different forms of Sa 10 145 Eustathius 146 Gregorius Pardus
149
ces whence the traditionary fables of
285
in offering prayers 221 Sacrifices and attendant rites 0 222 Vows 223 De IV AFFAIRS OF PRIVATE LIFE p 285304
313
ARCHÆOLOGY OF GREEK LITERATURE fessions among the Greeks 071 Gram
323
forms 309312 Tragedy 313317 death of Augustus 419 Chief gram
329
Noah nature of the Confusion of tongues
340
The probable foundation 19 7885 5 78 Causes of its decline
350
and preserved Palimpsesti 102 103
354
ARCHAEOLOGY OF ROMAN LITERATURE
359
13
367
Rrring Regina
374
roans Two different theories respecting ancient Latin manuscripts known
379
Eloquence of the Gracchi philosophy at Rome 456 Academic
396
Panegyrists Claudius Mamerunus
406
Mantua
408
30
421
ferences to writers on the topography of lunar cycle I 195 The solar 196
452
tus Smyrnaus or Calaber 079 Tryphio 165 Eumathius
455
Rhetoricians and Grammarians 408 Romans Survey of the Empire 0 481
481
Principal writers during the next
482
known in the heroic ages 83 Eloquence
483
authors in this department B412 General Roman writers on husbandry 486
487
Æschines Hyperides Dinarchus
489
ence of the Grammarian 0417 The an Solinus 496 Vibius Sequester
497
progress of the Latin Language Monu
549
and adjoining islands
550
History p 536541
594
505 Fulgentius Albricus Design of the notice here to be taken
624
Science p 638642
638
The early and later ortho liques and the study of ihem 152 Ori
643
in low estimation at Rome 0 544 Early guage p
647
creased 65 a Temples more splendid Camps Ø 145 Standards and ensigns
665
Sacrifices and aitendant ceremonies 69 cities 0 149 Treatment of captured places
672
Trophonius of Esculapius and others their principal parts Vessels of war V 156
678

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Page 313 - It would be ridiculous to affirm as a discovery, that the species of the horse was probably never the same with that of the lion ; yet, in opposition to what has dropped from the pens of eminent writers, we are obliged to observe, that men have always appeared among animals a distinct and...
Page 134 - Echidna; a monster having the head and breasts of a woman, the body of a dog, the tail of a serpent, the wings of a bird, the paws of a lion, with a human voice.
Page 357 - It was sent as a present to King Charles I. from Cyrillus Lucaris, a native of Crete, and patriarch of Constantinople, by Sir Thomas Rowe, ambassador from England to the Grand Seignior in the year 1628. Cyrillus brought it with him from Alexandria where it was probably written.
Page 433 - ... irregular style of building, which continued to be imitated, especially in Italy, during the dark ages. It consisted of Grecian and Roman details, combined under new forms, and piled up into structures wholly unlike the antique originals. Hence the names Greco-gothic and Romanesque architecture have been given to it.
Page 255 - Equites and the centuries of this class were called first to give their votes, and if they were unanimous, the matter was determined but if not, then the centuries of the next class were called, and so on, till a majority of centuries had voted the same thing. And it hardly ever happened that they came to the lowest, Liv. i. 43. Dionys. vii. 59.
Page 90 - ... by the lovely goddess Hebe. Here they conversed of the affairs of heaven and earth; and as they quaffed their nectar, Apollo, the god of music, delighted them with the tones of his lyre, to which the Muses sang in responsive strains. When the sun was set, the gods retired to sleep in their respective dwellings. The following lines from the Odyssey...
Page 166 - ... cunningly contrived as to have a small aperture, easily concealed, and level with the surface of the rock. This was barely large enough to admit the entrance of a single person; who having descended into the narrow passage, might creep along until he arrived immediately behind the centre of the altar; where, being hid by some colossal statue or other screen, the sound of his voice would produce a most imposing effect among the humble votaries prostrate beneath, who were listening in silence upon...
Page 492 - The scarcity and dearness of books gave high value to that learning, which a man with a well stored and a ready and clear elocution could communicate. None without eloquence could undertake to be instructors ; so that the sophists in giving lessons of eloquence were themselves the example. They frequented all places of public resort, the agora, the...
Page 228 - Roman citizens, who, with the proportion of women and children, must have amounted to about twenty millions of souls. The multitude of subjects of an inferior rank was uncertain and fluctuating. But, after weighing with attention every circumstance which could influence the balance, it seems probable that there existed, in the time of Claudius, about twice as many provincials as there were citizens, of either sex, and of every age; and that the slaves were at least A equal in number to the free inhabitants...
Page 305 - Its front is occupied by a bas-relief and inscription. — A. sort of solid bench for the reception of urns runs round the funeral chamber, and several niches for the same purpose are hollowed in the wall, called columbaria from their resemblance to the holes of a pigeon-house.

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