The novels of Samuel Richardson, esq. To which is prefixed, a memoir of the life of the author [by sir W. Scott].

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Page 185 - I am afraid my uncle will think himself justified by them on this occasion, when he asserts, that it is one of the most difficult things in the world to put a woman right, when she sets out wrong.
Page 309 - But let concealment like a worm i' th' bud Feed on her damask cheek: she pin'd in thought, And with a green and yellow melancholy, She sat like Patience on a Monument, Smiling at grief.
Page 353 - Look not upon me, because I am black, because the sun hath looked upon me: my mother's children were angry with me; they made me the keeper of the vineyards; but mine own vineyard have I not kept.
Page 282 - Great souls by instinct to each other turn, Demand alliance, and in friendship burn ; A sudden friendship, while with stretch'd-out rays They meet each other, mingling blaze with blaze.
Page 279 - Her virtue, and the conscience of her worth, That would be woo'd, and not unsought be won...
Page 44 - I do not like thee, Dr. Fell; The reason why, I cannot tell But I don't like thee, Dr. Fell ell— I II.
Page 482 - I should not account the debts incurred debts of honour; and should hardly scruple, had I not indirectly promised payment, by asking time for it, or had they refused to give it, to call in to my aid the laws of my country; and the rather, as the appeal to those laws would be a security to me against ever again being seen in such company. Adversity is the trial of principle: without it, a man hardly knows whether he is an honest man. Two things, my cousin in his present difficulties must guard against;...
Page 166 - For what glory is it, if, when ye be buffeted for your faults, ye shall take it patiently? but if, when ye do well, and suffer for it, ye take it patiently, this is acceptable with God.
Page 68 - I did nothing but dream of robbers, rescues, and murders: such an impression had the distress of this young lady made on my mind. They made me a poor report, proceeded she, of the night she had passed. And as I told you, she fainted away this morning, a little before you came, on her endeavouring to give me some account of her affecting story. Let me tell you, Mr. Reeves, I am as curious as you can be, to know the whole of what has befallen her. But her heart is tender and delicate: her spirits are...
Page 36 - And take all lives of things from you; The world depend upon your eye, And when you frown upon it, die: Only our loves shall still survive, New worlds and natures to outlive, And, like to heralds...

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