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PROCEED, friend Urban, to improve the age!

, The fire of youth ftill glows in every page ; Thy genius faints not at th' approach of time; Long may this news be spread through every clime ! URBAN still lives, to bless and please mankind, To mend the manners, and improve the mind. Learning, enliven'd at the grateful sound, With joyful echoes makes the air rebound : Her favourite Johnson from her arm is filed, And many more are number'd with the dead : In the short space of one revolving year, She oft has dropp'd the sympathetic tear. To check her sorrows for these joys bereft, Among her sons one darling still is left; Learning and Genius at th' event rejoice ; Among their votaries, this the public voice, Long may'st thou live, with fame and honour crown'd, And thy productions ever be renown'd! Nor yet alone is all the merit due, Nor does their fondness center all in you: Another URBAN ftill divides their care, A younger hope, who bids them not despair. These Sisters still have that one joy in store, Should they be forc'd their URBAN to deplore 3 If the stern Fates should snatch you to the skies, Another Phoenix will immediate rise!

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Dec. 31, 1785

The Gentleman's Magazine

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CONTAINING
ABore in Quantity and greater Hariety ban ang Book of the Rind and Price.

Meteorol. Diaries for July and Auguft, 1784, 494 Story of Mrs. Bellamy's Boy Percr

519

Remarkably large Willow Tree defcribed 495 Natural Curiofities discovered in Russia

520

Dr. Johnson's Character of Barerri 4970. the low Progress of the Arts

522

Parallel Paffages of Shakspeare illustrated 498 Epicaphs-Founder of Emanuel College

523

Mr. Barrington's Remarks on Archery 499 Summary of Proceedings in Palianent 524-530

Particulars of J. Davis of Kidwelly, 500 Case of D'Entrecaticaux, his Wife's Murderer, 533

Inestimable Di Bolvent for human Calculi 501 Different Names of Birds in Engl. and Scotl. 534

Natural Phänomenon ac Newton, Wales, 502 Rules of a new Literary Society at Montrole

535

On the Beg Timber found in the Ille of Man 503 Eflay on Thinking

536

Smgular Antiquities in Chatham Church 504 Anecdotes of Dean Swift

Letter from Dr. Seveley to Springert Peon 505 Story of a Trial for Defamation

ib.

Warrant of Juson-Account of Sedgbrook 506 of Players and Publicans Two Centuries ago 539

Love Letter, by a Gloucestershire Divine, 507 Catalogue of New Publications

ib

Milton's Writings burnt at Oxford 508 Review of New PUBLICATIONS $41-550

D&eace of List of new Peers-On purpureus 509 Variety of ORIGINAL POETRY

517--560

Jacobitism, its Tendency - Artificial Magnets Sri Vindication of Dr. Franklin

Remarks on some lare Discoveries $12 Foreign Affairs -- American, Scotch, Country,

Antiquarian Nores in Dorche Aer Church 5131

and Domestic News, &c.

562-969

Remarks on the Letter to Mr. Warton it Lifts of Births, Marriages, Deaths, Promotions,

A Perfian Tale-Atrerbury's Latinity 5:51 Prefermenis, &c. &c.

570-575

Scri&ures on the Trearment of Methodists 516 Average Prices, of Corn and Grain

ib.

Original Anecdotes of Gen. Oglethorpe 5'711'rices of Stocks

Illuftrated with a Representation of several curious ANTIQUITIES at NEWTON and MARCAM,

in GLAMOROANSHIRE, and at OLD CARLISLE ; alio with a remarkable

Phänomenon in the Heavens, observed in Russia.

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Londos, Printed by J. NICHOLS, for D. HENRY, laie of SAINT John's Gate.

20614

July | Barometer.
Thermom.

Rain.

Wind. Days. Inch. 2oths

rooths of inch.

Weather.

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30

61 63 61

38

30

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1 29 16 59

E

overcast.
30

59
NE

fair. 3 30

65
E

fog, bright, hot, and Aill . 4 29 19

66
SW

fair, fill, hot-hazy evening .
29
18 68
S

fair, Aill, and hot.
69
SE

bright and hor.
2914
75

ditio diflant thunder S.W. 3 8

29
IO
25
E

faint sunih. thro' hazy brisk wind 29 16

61
W

overcast, moderate heat. 20 29 19

62
N

ditto, and mild. 11 30

W

clouds and fan, temperate air. 12 29 14

W

clouds and wind. 13

W

clouds and sun, temperate aix 14

W

overcast and gloomy. 15

N

bright and hot. 16

W

ditto. 17 29 15

W

clouds and fun. 18 29 14

W

ditto. 3

; S

.15. Jouring rain, 29 3

SW

..5 clouds, wind, and rain. 21 29 IO

ditto. 22 29 7

W

clouds and fun, brisk wind 4. 23 29 14 58

W.

clouds and fun. 24

W

clouds and sun, warm air, 29

SW

rain. 26

66

SW
29
8
61
W
• 92

rain.

OBSERVATIONS. 1 Hay makes apace. Plants Aag, not being used to hot fun.-2 Rasberries and currants begin to ripen.-3 Very violent storm in Hampshire. Therm. 85 at 2 o'clock.-4 Rye reaped.

N. B. No Diary kepo, after the 272b Day of rbis Month.

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AUGUST. N. B. No Journal kepe till ibe 3:6 Day of tbis Monib.
Auguf. Barometer.
Thermom.

Rain.

Wind. Days. Inch. 20ths

Weather. 100ths of inch.

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8

50
NW

white dew, cold inorn, fun, and 9 29 19 52

NW

fair 2.

(clouds 30 29 18 54

S

small rain, 11 30

SW

cloudy, warm, and still. 12 30

W

ditto. 33

W

overcast, mild and ftill.
30
NW

overcait, clofe, and hot.
30

68
SW

fog, fair, fill, and bet.
16
30

SW

bright and hot. 17 28 18

W

clouds and fun, warm air." N

fair, cold wind. 19 28 16

55
N

cloudy, bluffering cold wind.
28. 16

55
NE

small rain--hard rain.
54
NE

clouds and wind. 22 28

57
NE

dicto,
23
28 10

56
N

diito.
24
28

61
W

overcast, mild and fill, rain. 25 28 10

55
NE

44

rain +. 26

50
NW

overcast, windy. 27.

28
10 53
W

louring. 28 28

9
54
SW

. 15

ditto, rain.
29
28

55
NW

fair, windy.
28

54
E

log, fair, and lit.
31
28 I

60
W

..8

Imall rain, fair, and pleasant.

OBSERVATIONS. Several hasty Towears around, gone here to measure.-.2 Oats carried in ; wheat in leaf.

3 Apricois ripe, and a large cropem.4 Much wheat rem quis abroad, some upreaped.

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(493

Τ Η Ε

Gentleman's Magazine ;

For

JULY, 1785 :

BEING THE SEVENTH NUMBER OF VOL. LV. PART II.

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“ SIR,

MR.URBAN, Lichfeld, July 20. size* might be recorded. When in **#HE large willow tree in Lichtield last year, he begged to have

the fore-ground of the another copy of rhe letter, having misT

view of Stow-hill, near placed the former, and not being able to this city, sent to your recover it; but he was so ill during the

Magazine by my wor- latter part of his Nav, that it was for#XHH thy friend the Rev. Mr. gotten: Dr. Jones has obligingly fa

White, in June laft, p. voured me with a copy; which is as 416, has been generally supposed to

follows: have been planted by the late Dr. Samuel Johnson's father, as the Doctor In consequence of the conversation never failed to visit it whenever he I had lately with you, I have taken the came to Lichheld. The vicinity of a dimensions of the Lichfield willow. building, known by the name of “ The The trunk rises to the height of twelve “Parchment House," perhaps gave rise feet eight inches, and five tenths, and to fuch Tupposition, as the Doctor would is then divided into fifteen large ascendnever admit the fact. The business of ing branches, which, in very numcrous. parchment-making was, for many years, and crowded subdivisions, spread at the carried on by old Mr. Johnson, at that top in a circular form, not unlike the place, until he had greatly enriched his appearance of a thady oak, inclining a fervants, and injured his own fortune. little towards the East. The circumThere are now no vestiges remaining of ference of the trunk at the bottom is fuch maoufactory; the pits are filled fifteen feet, nine inches, and five tenths; up, and the yard occupied, in part, by in the middle, eleven feet ten inches; a gardener, and by Mr. Saville, one of and at the top, immediately below the the gentlemen belonging to our cathe- branches, 'thirteen feet. The entire dral, who has lately planted a botanic height of the tree is forty-nine fcet; garden, conGfting of above seven hun- and the circumference of the branches, dred specimens of rare and elegant at their extremities, upwards of two plants, well worthy the notice of the hundred teet, over shadowing a plane curious.

nor far short of four thoufand feet. The This willow, as before observed, at- furface of the trunk is very uneven: tracted the attention of Dr. Johnson and the bark is much furrowed. The for many years; and during his visit at

* As the scale of our place was too imall Lichfield, 'in the year 1781, he desired

to exhibit an exact representarion of the wile : Dr. Jones, a physician of that place, to

low, our friendly correfpondent has accomgive him an account of it, saying it was

panied his letter with another drawing, takon by much the largest tree of the kind ho

by Mr. Stringer, from the South; which ha'! had ever seen or heard of, and therefore be given in a miscellaneous plate next montir. willed to give an account of it in the The former view was taken from the North "Philosophical Transactions," that its Weito Edit.

trce

tree has now a vigorous and increasing opportunity for extensive growth. The appearance. The willow, in its ge- most moderate reputation of its age neric character, reaches but a middling is near fourscore years, and some refize; yet there are some species which spectable authorities strongly incline to, authors describe as of larger growth think a century has passed over its head. than others. This appears to me to be li were to be wished, that we had some the twenty-ninth of Linnæus, Salix fo- certain knowledge of the time it left its liis fubintergeminis lanceolato-linearibus parent stock, but it has probably outlongifimis acatis fubtus fericeis, ramis lived all those who might have remem. virgatis; which, Miller says, seldom bered its infancy; and as the place where grows to a large size.

it stands has no celebrity, it can scarce “ But as great size is owing to fitua- be expected that the accidental spring, tion, we may perhaps find, in the spot ing, or even designed planting, of a foallotted to this tree, much of the cause litary willow should be a ciicumstance of its extraordinary growth. It stands of so much notice as to have its date nearly midway, between the Minster transmitted to posterity. and Stow pools, in the boggy vale “ I am, with inucli esteem, Sir, your through which the Pipe Brook runs; most obedient and faithful servant, and at the bottom of a gentle descent,

TREVOR JONES, which rerminates, at a thort distance, in Lichfield, 26 Novemb. 1781. a deep moor.

To Dr. Samuel Jolinfon.” “ Draining and an acceffion of soil

On the summit of the hill, beyond have, of Jate years, made the ground the great willow tree, appears an handnear the tree a rich and firm loam, rais- some dwelling-house, erected about thç ed a little higher than the surface of the

year 1754, by Mrs. Elizabeth Afton, mpoor. A public footpath croises the daughter of the late Sir Thomas Afton, roots of the tree on the South West of Åston in Cheshire, and liter-in-law fide, and that, with the consolidation of to the lare Gilberi Walmesley, Esquire, the light spungy moor, may have been the friend and patron of Dr. Johnson. the reason that the inclination of the The venerable old building next attracts tree, from the force of the Northerly our notice. It is supposed to be the most and' Wefterly winds, is less than usual ancient church belonging to the city : in aquatic tices, especially those which is dedicated to St. Chadd, and generally have diffuse heads.

called Stow Church. Adjoining, for“ All the banks of the brook which merly stood the cell of St. Chadd. By in:erfects the vale are moor, in some fome authentic papers preserved in the places improved by the industry of cul: archives of the vicars choral of thc cas ture; in others remaining, dangerous thedral, mention is made of an altar dequagmires

concealed by maried dicated to St. Catharine, as appears by fedges, reeds, and other marny plants. the following transcript : " Roger, bí. There are several willows in the cul- thop of Coventric and Lichfield, did or. rivated lands, and some of confider- dain a chantrie at Stowe, and built an able size, but mostly aspiring I nica: house, and gavę lands and yearly reve: sured one on the West side of the bridge,

nues to a pricit, which ihould be one of above the Miniter pool, feven feet eight the vicars, to say mat, there daily, which inches in circumference, and about forty priest should have all such alloivances feet high.

as the vicars had. But this mats being · Wet foils are the natural fituations neglected, and the house decayed, John of willows; and marshy.places, accord- dean of Lichfield and the Chaptei did ing to Dr. Priestley, are more peculiarly enter upon the chantery, and made one their choice. Such places abound with King priest there, and reitored the house, inflammable air, which he supposes to

lands, and revenues to the chantery be the food of the willow. I collected againe, that the bishop gave; wherelarge quantities a few paces from the upon the fubchanter and his fellow tree; and if plenty and vicinity facili.

vicars went into the Chapter-houle, and tated the incrcale, it is no wonder that promised that some one of there fellowe this willow Phould attain to diftinguish- priests and vicars should say dayley the ed a fize.

mass there, and that thev would repaire “ los age also has afforded rime and the house thereto belonginge, and that

was ordered in the Chapter-house then, * Since then drained, and made good land, that the subchanter and company of vio by the Rev. Dr. Falconur,

cars should present a fit man to them,

within

a

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