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course, spell by what hand hee was taken away ; yet may he observe a strange connivance at, and contentednesse with the thing done.

Fifthly, Here we may see what a slave King James was to his favourites ; this appears by many passages of this story, but especially by his passion at Greenwich, when the lieutenant of the Tower told him of Somersets threatning speeches, and by his agony, till he heard that Somerset tooke his arraignement patiently, and had told no tales.'

? Of these five propositions, the first and fourth are false, the second dubious, the third and fifth partly true, partly exaggerated. The preface is not by Sir Anthony Welldon, but by the publisher.

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SINCE THE DEATH OF THAT EVER GLORIOUS QUEEN

ELIZABETH, UNTIL THIS PRESENT.

BY THE AUTHORS OWN OBSERVATION, WHO WAS EITHER EYE OR
EAR WITNESS, OR FROM SUCH AS WERE ACTORS IN THEM,

FROM THEIR OWN RELATION.

Upon the twenty-fourth of March, 1602, Q. E. did set the most glorious sun that ever shined in our firmament of England, (the never to be forgotten Queen Elizabeth, of happy p. 2: memory,) about three in the morning, at her mannour of Richmond, not only to the

death,

* The figures on the side mark the paging of the original edition, and are here retained for the facility of the references from Aulicus Coquinariæ.

unspeakable grief of her servants in particular, but of all her subjects in general.

And although many of her courtiers adored that rising sun, appearing in the north, yet since, not without regret of their monstrous ingratitude to her (that sun) now set, and in peace.

For no sooner was that sun set, but Sir Robert Carew,' (her near kinsman, and whose family and himself she had raised from the degree of a mean gentleman to high honour in title and place,) most ingratefully did catch at her last breath, to carry it to the rising sun, then in Scotland, notwithstanding a strict charge laid to keep fast all the gates, yet (his father being Lord Chamberlaine) he by that means found favour to get out to carry the first news ; *

· Sir Robert Cary, afterwards created Earl of Monmouth, tenth son of Henry Lord Hunsdon. His father was related to Queen Elizabeth by the mother's side. Cary wrote Memoirs of his own Life, which were pub'lished by the Earl of Corke and Orrery, and republished at Edinburgh in 1808.

• Cary escaped out of court by the interest of his

which, although it obtained for him the governourship of the Duke of York, yet hath set so wide a mark of ingratitude on him, that it will remain to posterity a greater blot, then the honour he obtained afterward will ever wipe out.'

About nine in the morning of that day, K. James was proclaimed King James, of blessed king. memory, by the title of James the First ; and now nothing on all hands, but preparations for accommodating him in his journey for England, many posting into Scotland for preferment, either by indearing themselves by some merit of their own to the king, or by purchasing friends with

proclaimed

brother Sir George, the gates having been shut by order of the privy-council. He reached Edinburgh in three days, notwithstanding a severe fall by the way. See p. 146.

* It cannot be denied, that the interested and coldblooded anxiety with which Cary haunted the rooms of the dying queen, (his mistress, kinswoman, and benefactress,) in order to obtain and carry the earliest news of her decease, was a great stain on his character. He was created Lord Lippington, and afterwards Earl of Monmouth.

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