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Charleville, Lord, 326.

Drummond, Mrs Elizabeth, mother of
Chatham, Mr Drummond at, 39. Thomas Drummond, 3, 4, 8, 17,
Christie, Mr, 33, 36.

175, 177 ; letters to her from him,
Church, the, in Ireland, 204, 235, 21, 26, 27, 41, 76, 126, 128, 135,
241, 304, 306, 307.

142, 143, 151, 182, 278, 406, 409,
Clans, Irish, 187 899.

410, 417, 424, 425; from Mr Robe,
Clare, county of, 363.

181 ; from Mr Littleton, 182; from
Clare, Lord, on Irish confiscations, 218. her daughter-in-law, 411, 413;
Colby, Colonel, Mr Drummond's in from Lord Normanby, 412; from

troduction to, 46; his direction of Lord Ebrington, 427; from Lord
the Ordnance Survey, 54-61, 67, Spencer, 427; from Sir John F. W.
70, 74, 80; his compensating Herschel, 437, 73, 170.
measuring bar, 86, 95, 440.

Drummond, James, father of Thomas
Combe, Dr Andrew, on the authorship Drummond, 3-5.

of the maxim, “ Property has its Drummond, John, 3, 17, 162, 180.
duties as well as its rights," 330, Drummond, Miss, 3, 64, 175, 407;
334.

quoted, 6, 8, 17, 30, 114, 152;
Comrie, village of, 4.

letters from Mr Drummond to, 117.
Confiscations, Irish, 217.

421; the Drummond Scholarship
Connaught, 205, 364.

founded by, 430, 465.
Constabulary, Irish, 266 899., 451, 453. Drummond, Mrs Maria, wife of Mr
Coolin Hills, 59.

Drummond, 184 ; letters from her
Cooper, Austin, murder of, 313; to his mother, 411, 413; her last

punishment of the murderers, 339. interview with him, 426.
Cork, county of, 355.

Drummond, Thomas, his birth and
Corporations, municipal, in Ireland, parentage, 1 ; early circumstances,
304, 307.

5-8; mechanical ingenuity, 16, 40,
Corrie Habbie, a surveying station, 43, 128, 169, 172; attachment to
54, 56.

his mother, 8, 185; at school, 9;
Cox, Robert, 174, 430.

a pupil of Professor Jardine, 11;
Craig, Rev. A., 44.

literary culture, 11, 13, 44; mathe-
Crime in Ireland, means of suppress matical studies, 12, 13, 28, 34, 88,

ing, 265 899., 341, 454, 459; de 65; at University of Edinburgh, 12,
crease of, 285.

66; boyish traits, 15; voyage to
Croker, Mr, his attacks on Mr Drum-

Argyleshire, 17; at Woolwich, 14,
mond, 146, 151.

43; enters the Royal Engineers, 37;
Cromwell in Ireland, 212, 221, 240. studies at Plymouth, 38; Chatham,

39, 43; visits France, 40; pontoon
DAILEY, Alderman, 267.

invented by, 40; adventure on a
Danes in Ireland, 193.

bridge of casks, 42; in Edinburgh,
Davis, Sir John, on Ireland, 189, 239.

43, 78, 81; thinks of going to the bar,
Dawson, Captain, 29, 41, 43, 63, 66, 44; his views of the qualifications
102, 103, 143 ; his account of the

necessary for that career, 45; en-
Ordnance Survey in the Highlands gages in the Ordnance Survey, 46 :
of Scotland, 55.

his services in that department in
De Beaumont, Gustave, his work on

Scotland, 62, and Ireland, 64, 112,
Ireland, 240.

247; studies chemistry, 65; his
Defenders, an Irish faction, 226, 230. lime-light, 66, 73, 75, 77, 81, 83,
De Vere, Aubrey, on English Misrule

his

papers on it in the Phi-
and Irish Misdeeds, 240.

losophical Transactions," 67, 117,
Diamond, Battle of the, 296, 303, 119, 126; his heliostat, 70, 81, 171,
312.

438; stationed on Slieve Snaght, in
Distraint for debt, 284.

Ireland, 75; injury to his health
Divis mountain, 74, 76, 80, 439.

from exposure, 75, 78, 81 ; his at-
Donard, Slieve, 81.

tempts to improve the barometer,
Donegal, county of, 363, 370.

80; measurement of the base at
Donoughmore, Lord, letter to, 814-

Lough Foyle, 81, 83, 112, 167, 440;
324.

his share in the construction of the
Down, county of, 355, 357.

compensation measuring bar, 86, 90,

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438;

106; his letter to Sir John F. W. troversy as to its authorship, 329 ;
Herschel respecting the Irish base proved to be Mr Drummond's, 331,
line, 107; again in bad health, 113 339, 366; its effects on the fortunes
116; trial of his Light as a means of of the Whig Government, 339; his
illuminating lighthouses, 114, 128 ; scheme for increasing the prosperity
elected a member of the Royal of Ireland, 341; Commission on
Astronomical Society, 119; his visit Irish railroads, 236, 341, 409; this
to William IV. at Brighton, 128 ; | suggested and mainly worked by
resides in Park Road, London, 135; him, 345 ; instructions to the Com-
close of his scientific career, 136, missioners, 346; their Reports, 347,
167; remarks on that career, 168; 874, 383, 410, 412, 414, 415; his
is a member of the Boundary Com share in the composition of these,
mission, 140, 161; attacked by Mr 352; his account of the moral and
Croker, 146; backed by Professors economical condition of the Irish,
Barlow, Airy, and Wallace, and 334; sends relief to the starving
Sir John Herschel, 148, 150, 154, peasantry of Donegal, 370; Irish
157; attacked by Mr Pollock, 149, Municipal Boundary Commission,
151 ; how remunerated for his ser 403 ; abolition of Irish hulks, 403 ;
vices, 152, 181; recruits his health at suppression of Sunday fairs in the
Brighton, 160, 181; letter from his Phenix Park, 404; his life in Ire-
fellow Commissioners requesting land, 404; Royal Dublin Society,
him to sit for his portrait, 160, 182 ; 406; correspondence with Mr Talbot
letter on the Perthshire election, Glascock, 408; birth of a daughter,
163; letter to Mr Aitchison of Drum 409; declining health, 410; resi-
more on the Leith election, 164; dence at Kingstown, 410; tour to
declines to become a candidate for the Continent, 414; examination
the Chair of Natural Philosophy in before the Roden Committee, 419,
Edinburgh, 167; engaged in pre-

422; visit to Lord Spencer, 421;
paring an account of the measure proposal that he should enter Par-
ment of the base at Lough Foyle, Iiament, 422; last illness, 424, 425;
167; is Private Secretary to Lord death, 426 ; expressions of public
Althorp, 178, 173, 185; Miss Mar sorrow, 427 ; letters of condolence
tineau's reminiscences of, 173, to his mother, 427; his burial, 429;
175, 255, 283, 312, 326, 327, 430, statue by Hogan, 430; his character,
433; visits Brougham Hall, 177 ; 16, 137 167, 172, 176, 184, 246,
communications to the Scotsman 250, 430-5, 437; his letters to his
newspaper, 177; writes in the mother, 21, 26, 27, 41, 76, 126, 128,
London papers, 178; letter on the 135, 142, 143, 151, 182, 278, 406,
Duke of Wellington's accession to 409, 410,417, 424, 425; to his sister,
the office of prime minister, 179; 117, 421; scholarship in memory of
again in tad health, 181, 182; him, in the University of Edin-
goes to Ireland as Under Secretary, burgh, 430, 465.
183, 184; his marriage, 184; his Drummond Light, the, 66, 73, 75–77,
sbare in the administration of Irish 81, 83, 115, 171, 438; trial of it in
affairs, 243 899., 432; his intimate lighthouses, 114-128.
knowledge of the country and Dublin, police of, in 1835, 267 ; sup-
people, 247; his power and love of pression of Sunday fairs in, 404;
work, 250, 253; his account of blowing up of statue of William III.,
Ribandism, 260, 264; organisation 408; statue of Drummond in, 430.
of the constabulary by, 266; sup- Dublin Evening Post on the authorship
pression of faction fights, 269, 276, | of the maxim, “ Property has its
of Orangeism, 277 899., 296, and duties as well as its rights," 334.
of Ribandism, 288; correspondence
with Colonel Verner, 296 ; corre- EBRINGTON, Lord, 339, 417, 418; his
spondence with the Tipperary | letter to Mr Drummond's mother,
magistrates, 314, 332, 336; his 427.
maxim, “ Property has its duties as Edinburgh, the birthplace of Mr
well as its rights," 322, 325, 827; Drummond, 1; his studies in, 12;
anger excited by it, 325, 327; con- ! residence and occupations in, 43;

his portrait in the University of, Glengall, Lord, letter of, 313; reply
161 ; scholarship founded there in to, 314, 324.
memory of him, 430, 465.

Graham's mercurial pendulum, 84.
Edinburgh Review on the Drummond Grey, Lord, 138; dissolution of his

Light, 127; on Mr Drummond's evi ministry, 178.
dence before the Roden Committee, Griffith, Sir Richard, 345, 352.
256 ; article on that Committee Guinness, Mr, 292.

referred to, 240.
Edward I., statute of, regarding jurors, HALL, Captain Basil, his account of
457, 458.

the trial of the Drummond Light in
Emigration, Irish, 268.

a lighthouse, 121–5.
Engineers, Royal, 25, 27 ; history of Hallam, Henry, on Ireland, 219, 240.
the corps, 37.

Hancock, Dr, 388, 390, 464.
Episcopalians, number of, in Ireland, Harkness, Lieutenant, 348, 349, 352.
304.

Harrison's gridiron pendulum, 84.
Eric, law of, 192, 199.

Harvey, Sir John, 271.
Examiner newspaper quoted, 184, Hatherton, Lord, 142, 182, 421, 422.
333.

Heliostat, Mr Drummond's, 70, 81,

438, 171.
Faction fights, Irish, 188, 265 899., Henry II., conquest of Ireland by,
276, 321.

195.
Fairman Plot, 259.

Henry VIII., Ireland in his reign,
Fairs, Irish, drinking at, 277; sup-

201.
pression of Sunday fairs in the Herschel, Sir John, letter of concer.
Phenix Park, 404.

ing Mr Drummond, 437, 73, 100,
Famines in Ireland, 367, 370, 398. 170, 171 ; on the Ordnance Survey,
Fitzwilliam, Earl, on the state of Ire 49, 83; on the compensation mea-
land, 231.

suring bar, 95, 100, 105, 440; his
Flax-culture in Ireland, 357.

visit to Lough Foyle, and sketch
Flour-mills in Ireland, 359.

of the measuring of the base-line
Foyle, Lough, measurement of base there, 106-8; his defence of Mr
line at, 81, 83-112, 167, 440.

Drummond on the Borough ques-
France, trigonometrical survey of, 51, tion, 148, 150, 153, 154, 157; the

53; railways in, 380, 395 ; effect of Edinburgh Chair of Natural Philo-
the first French Revolution on Ire sophy offered to, 167,
land, 230.

Highlands of Scotland, station-hunt-
Freeholders, Irish, 360.

ing by the Ordnance surveyors in
French, Mr, 385.

the, 55-61.
Fresnel's lamp, 67, 73, 439.

Hinde, Mr Hodgson, 383.

Hounslow Heath, base-line on, 51,
Galt, Mr, on railway reform, 396. 110.
Galway, county of, 363.

Hulks, Irish, abolition of, 403.
Garviemore inn, 58.
Gauss, Professor, 70, 171.

INSPECTOR-GENERAL of Irish con-
Gavelkind, law of, 190, 192.

stabulary, 272, 420, 451-3.
Geodesy, methods of, 47. See Ord Ireland, sketch of the history of, 186;
nance Survey.

two “nations" in, 186; the tribes,
George III., Ireland under, 224 899.; 187; clans or septs, 187; faction

petition of Irish Catholics to, 228, fights, 188, 265, 269, 276, 321 ;
240; Trish statutes in reign of, Christianity, 189, 191, 195; law of
449-53, 461-2.

succession, 190 ; the Brehon laws,
George IV., Ireland under, 234; Irish 192-4; Anglo-Norman incursions

statutes in reign of, 449-51, 454, into, 195; conquest by Henry II.,
458, 461, 462.

195; state of, at that time, 187,
Giraldus Cambrensis, 239.

198; Danish incursions, 193; bruta-
Gladstone, Mr, on the maxim, “ Pro lities and oppression during the

perty has its duties as well as its four succeeding centuries, 198;
rights,327.

the Pale, 198, 201, 202; conflict of
Glascock, Talbot, 468.

laws, 199; statutes of Kilkenny,

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201 209 216. 239 : reign of Henry' in that administration, 244 899.,
VIII., 201-205; Church of the 426; efforts to suppress Orangeisin
Irish Romanised, 203, 209; reign of in 1835, 258, 277, 288, 296; agra-
Elizabeth, 204, 219; conquest of rian outrages, 264, 312, 321; faction
Munster, and frightful sufferings of fights, 188, 265, 269, 276, 321 ; sup-
the people, 205; devastation of pression of crime, 265 899., 341; de-
Ulster, 206; re-organisation of Ire crease of crime, 265 899., 285, 341 ;
land under James I., 208; English police force, 266 899., 449; con-
laws introduced, 207; forfeitures stabulary, 266, 451, 453; admission
and evictions, 208; the Reformation, of Catholics into constabulary, 274,
209; penal laws, 209, 210, 215, 295; stipendiary magistrates, 273,
240; reign of Charles I., 210; 277, 280, 453 ; public prosecutors,
rebellion of 1641, 211, 240; Crom 281; juries, 282, 314 899., 320, 420,
well in, 212, 221, 240 ; depopula 443, 454, 457; petty sessions, 283,
tion by the war, 213; struggle in 362; distraint for debt, 284; defeat
James II.'s reign, 215; William II1., of Irish bills of the Melbourne Ad-
215; treaty of Limerick, 215, 240; ministration in Parliament, 303 ;
subsequent oppression of the Roman Tithe Commutation Bill, 303, 306,
Catholics, 215-221, 228; confisca 310; Municipal Reform Bill, 304,
tions, 217; universal discontent, 307; Poor-Law Bill, 305, 308, 368 ;
219; increase of population in the Mr Drummond's letter to the magis-
18th and 19th centuries, 220, 232, trates of Tipperary, 313–339, 367 ;
237; hatred of England, 221; sub its effects on the fortunes of the
division of land among tenants, Whig Government, 339; commis-
222, 232, 359 899.; absentees, 222, sion on Irish railways (see Rail-
237; the Whiteboys or Levellers, ways); necessity of means of em-
224; the Rightboys, 225; the Oak ployment of the people, 343;
boys and Steelboys, 226; the Peep English ignorance of Ireland, 334;
of-day-boys, 226; Defenders, 226, moral and economical state of the
230; Orangemen, 226, 258 899., 277, people, 354; famines, 357, 370,
296, 408; United Irishmen, 226, 398; agriculture, 357; manufac-
230; rebellion of 1798, 226, 231; tures, 358; subdivision of the
increase of wealth, 227 ; causes of land, 359 899., 232; forty shilling
relaxation of penal laws, 228 ; freeholders, 360; litigation be-
Parliament of Ireland, 228, 232; tween agricultural labourers and
demand for free trade, 229; in employers, 362; potato diet, 237,
fluence of the American War of 364; reclamation of waste lands,
Independence, 229; of the French 367; emigration, 368; character of
Revolution, 230; Union with Great the peasantry, 370; their habits of
Britain, 232, 241; subsequent con idleness, 371; their moral purity,
spiracies and rebellions, 233; secret 190; reasons for Government aid
societies, 234; Insurrection Act, to public works, 373; bill for for-
234, 235; Catholic emancipation, mation of railways (see Railways);
235, 295-6; Church of, 204, 236, financial position of Irish railways in
241, 304, 306, 307; agitations 1866, 389, 398; Municipal Boundary
for repeal of the Union, 236 ; Commission, 402; abolition of
Coercion Acts, 236; state of the hulks, 403; state of the law respect-
country in 1835-9, 237; landlords, ing illegal societies, 461; Royal
237, 285, 312, 321, 336, 364, 366; Dublin Society, 406; Trigono-
Ribandism or Ribbonism, 238, 258 metrical Survey, 64, 78, 79, 247-8.
899., 288; tithes, 238, 303, 306, 310, 438.
408; O'Connell, 238, 240, 291, 292,
310, 383; Orange Society, 238, 408; JACKSON, Mr, 22.
retrospect of Irish history, 238; list James I., Ireland under, 207; his in-
of authorities, 239; disaffection, 241; dignant disclaimer of tolerance in
Lord Mulgrave's Administration, religious matters, 210, 239.
183, 244; Lord Morpeth his Chief Jardine, Professor, 11, 13; letter from
Secretary, and Mr Drummond Under him to Mr Drummond, 30, 35.
Secretary, 183; Drummond's share Johnstone, Dr, 409, 412, 425, 426.

Jones, Major H. D., 348, 402. | Lucas, Mr, 382.
Juries, alleged intimidation of, in Tip- Lumper potato, 364.

perary, 314 $99.; constitution of, | Lyndhurst, Lord, on the Irish poor,
454 ; challenging of jurors, 282, 309.
320, 420, 457.

MacCAUSLAND, Mr, 115.
KATER, Captain, 67, 70, 95, 104. M•Culloch, J. R., on railway mis-
Kennedy, Colonel Shaw, 272, 420, 453. management, 391.
Ker, Bellenden, 135, 136, 142, 161,173. | Macfarlane, Mrs, 7; letters of Thomas
Kilkenny, county of, 355 ; Statutes of, Drummond to, 24, 25.
201, 209, 216, 239.

Macfarlane, William, 7.
King's County, 355.

Maclaren, Charles, 177, 180.
Kingstown, Mr Drummond's resi- M.Neill, Sir John, 348.
dence in, 410.

Madden, Dr, quoted, 244, 253, 255,

296, 329, 343, 423.
LAND, subdivision of, in Ireland, Magistrates, stipendiary, in Ireland,
232, 350 899

273, 277, 280, 453.
Landlord and tenant in Ireland, 237, Marsh, Sir Henry, 425.

285, 312, 321, 336, 360, 364; duties Martin, R. M., his work on Ireland,
of landlords, 322, 325, 366.

240.
Lansdowne, Marquis of, 345, 385. Martineau, Miss, 135; her reminis-
Larcom, General Sir T. A., his Memoir cences of Mr Drummond, 173, 175,

of Mr Drummond quoted, 19, 28, 34, 430; her estimate of his character
35, 39, 41, 42, 66, 75, 78, 80, 95, and services, 255, 827, 433; quoted
102, 127, 152, 160, 172, 175, 250, I on Irish affairs, 283, 312, 326.
266, 403, 404, 405, 415, 425, 426, Mayo, county of, 363.
429; information given to the author Measuring-rods used in the Ordnance
by, 44; his services on the Ord Survey, 50, 52, 81, 83, 86, 95, 440.
nance Survey, 79; map of Ireland, Melbourne, Lord, 178, 182; his in-
&c., prepared by, 349; letter of structions to the Boundary Corn-
Professor Barlow to, 352; now mission, 140, 144; defeat of the
Under Secretary in Ireland, 253. Irish measures of his administra-
Laws, old Irish, 192, 199, 207; Sta t ion in Parliament, 303.

tutes of Kilkenny, 201, 209, 216, Meridian, direction of the, 53.
239; law of England introduced Mica, Mr Drummond's experiments
into Ireland, 207 ; Irish penal laws, with, 97, 98, 101.

209, 210, 215-221, 228, 240. Miller, Colonel, 272.
Lawyers, qualifications necessary for Mitchell, Joseph, on railways, 392.
the success of, 45.

Mitscherlich, his discovery of a pro-
Leinster, 205, 357, 364 ; Duke of, perty of crystals, 101, 441.
381.

Monaghan, county of, 355, 357.
Leland's History of Ireland, 239. Moore, Thomas, letter from, to Mr
Leslie, Professor, 12, 18, 22, 166. Drummond, 336.
Levellers or Whiteboys, 224.

Morpeth, Lord, 245, 250, 292, 303,
Lewis, Sir George Cornewall, on "Irish 382, 383, 416.
Disturbances," &c., 240.

Mudge, Colonel, 20, 21, 25, 30, 33, 85,
Lighthouses, trial of the Drummond 53, 54, 110.

Light for the illumination of, 114- Mulgrave, Lord, afterwards Lord Nor-
127, 439, 440.

manby,) becomes Lord Lieutenant
Lime-light, 66, 442. See Drummond of Ireland, 183; his administration
Light.

there, 244, 454; personal charac-
Limerick, county of, 355 ; treaty of, ter, 244; his alleged claim to the
215, 240.

authorship of the maxim, “ Property
Littleton, Mr E. J., (afterwards Lord has its duties as well as its rights,"

Hatherton,) 142, 421, 422; his letter 329, 330, 334, 385, 338; becomes

to Mr Drummond's mother, 182. Minister for the Colonies, 339; let-
Longford, county of, 355.

ter from him to Mr Drummond's
Lorimer, Professor, his scheme of Par mother, 412; his liberation of Irish

liamentary representation, 158. 1 prisoners, 421.

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