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April 13, 1921. Canada–United States. House of Commons refused to adopt reciprocity agreement signed in Washington January 21, 1911, by vote 100-79.-Wash. Post, April 14, 1921, p. 4; Am. Jour. Int. Law, July, 1921.

April 19, 1921. Argentina–United States. Demand made on Government of Argentina by Ambassador of the United States that it take steps to release steamer Martha Washington from the boycott of the Buenos Aires port workers union.—New York Times, April 14, 1921. p. 18; Am. Jour. Int. Law, July, 1921.

April 14, 1921. France-United States. Reply of France of April 7 to United States note of April 4, relative to the status of the Island of Yap made public.-N. Y. Times, April 15, 1921, p. 1; Adv. of Peace, May, 1921, p. 190; Am. Jour. Int. Law, July, 1921.

April 15, 1921. Spain United States. Spain sent protest to President Harding against continued occupation of Santo Domingo by United States troops.-Cur. Hist., June, 1921, v. 14: p. 540; Am. Jour. Int. Law, July, 1921.

April 19, 1921. Netherlands United States. Note from United States delivered to Netherlands Government insisting that American oil corporations must have equal opportunities with the Royal Dutch Company or any other company in the development of the Djambi oil fields in Sumatra.—Text, N. Y. Times, April 30, 1921, p. 13; London Times, May 2, 1921, p. 8; 15 Am. Jour. Int. Law, July, 1921.

April 19, 1921. Great Britain United States. Note sent to Great Britain denying that United States had directed American Consul at San José to have Costa Rica cancel the Amory oil concession several months before it was annulled.-Cur. Hist., June, 1921, v. 14: 538; Am. Jour. Int. Law, July, 1921.

April 20, 1921. Allied Powers, Germany–United States. Germany addressed a memorandum to President Harding asking mediation on reparation. Proposal declined, April 21.-Text of both notes, N. Y. Times, April 22, 1921, p. 1; Wash. Post, April 23, 1921, p. 1. Reply made public April 27, contained new proposals.—Text, Temps, April 28, 1921, p. 1; N. Y. Times, April 27, 1921, p. 1. April 30, Supreme Council met in London to consider question of Reparation. London Times, May 2, 1921, p. 8. Secretary Hughes by note of May 2 informed Dr. Simons that German counter proposals are unacceptable as a basis for discussion.—Text, N. Y. Times, May 3, 1921, p. 1. Allied ultimatum sent to Berlin May 5, required reply by May 13.-Wash. Post, May 6, 1921, p. 1, 5. Allied ultimatum accepted on May 10 by Reichstag by vote of 221-175.-Wash. Post, May 11, 1921, p. 1; N. Y. Times, May 11, 1921, p. 1. Unconditional acceptance of Entente reparation terms delivered to Lloyd George.—Text, N. Y. Times, May 12, 1921, p. 1; Am Jour. Int. Law, July, 1921.

April 20, 1921. International Communications and Transit Conference. Barcelona conference which opened on March 10 adjourned, summary of work accomplished given by M. Hanotaux.—Temps, April 22, 1921, p. 1; Am. Jour. Int. Law, July, 1921.

April 20, 1921. Colombia–United States. Treaty signed at Bogota, April 6, 1914, for settlement of differences arising out of events which took place on Isthmus of Panama in November, 1903, was ratified by the United States Senate with amendments.-Cong. Rec., April 20, 1921, pp. 1-2, Text as passed: Cur. Hist., June, 1921, v. 14, p. 54; Am. Jour. Int. Law, July, 1921.

April 23, 1921. Nicaragua. Announces withdrawal from membership in League of Nations owing to expense involved.-Cur. Hist., June, 1921, v. 14: 535; Am. Jour. Int. Law, July, 1921.

April 26, 1921. Cable License Bill. S. 535 giving President of United States authority over cable landings on American shores passed Senate.Cong. Rec., April 26, 1921, p. 611; Am. Jour. Int. Law, July, 1921.

April 27, 1921. Siam-United States. Treaty concluded December 16, 1920, revising treaties heretofore existing between the two countries and protocol of same date, was ratified by United States Senate.-Text of Treaty, Cong. Rec., April 27, 1921, p. 663; Am. Jour. Int. Law, July, 1921.

April 87, 1921. Great Britain United States. Supplementary extradition convention regarding desertion or non-support of minor or dependent children ratified by United States Senate.-Cong. Rec., April 27, 1921, p. 663; 15 Am. Jour. Int. Law, July, 1921.

April 29, 1921. Netherlands. Second chamber of parliament voted adoption of Djambi oil field bill, thus barring bid of Standard Oil Company for a concession in the Sumatra oil region.-Wash. Post, April 30, 1921, p. 1; Am. Jour. Int. Law, July, 1921.

April 29, 1921. Italy-United States. Reply of Italy to United States note of April 5, as to the mandate over the Island of Yap, ex'pressed entire accord with policies of United States as stated in American note.-Text, N. Y. Times, April 30, 1921, p. 3; Adv. of Peace, May, 1921, p. 131 ; Am. Jour. Int. Law, July, 1921.

April 30, 1921. Germany_United States. Knox peace resolution (S. J. Res. 16) introduced on April 23, passed the United States Senate with amendments by vote of 49-23.—Text, Cong. Rec., April 30, 1921, p. 829; Am. Jour. Int. Law, July, 1921.

May 1, 1921. Indo-China (French)—United States. United States, Navy Department inaugurated a commercial communication service between the two countries, via Hawaii and Philippines.-Evening Star, May 2, 1921; Am. Jour. Int. Law, July, 1921.

May 3, 1921. League of Nations Assembly. Summons sent to members of League for second session of Assembly to be opened at Geneva September 5, accompanied by provisional agenda containing 25 items which include 15 reports on various questions investigated by League committees.-N. Y. Times, May 4, 1921, p. 2; Am. Jour. İnt. Law, July, 1921.

May 5, 1921. United States-Allied Powers. Formal invitation by Allied powers extended to the United States to be represented on Supreme Council Reparations Commission and Council of Ambassadors. -Wash. Post, May 6, 1921, p. 1. Accepted in note of May 6.-Text, Wash. Post, May 7, 1921, p. 1. Text of both notes.-Adv. of Peace, May, 1921, p. 187; Am Jour. Int. Law, July, 1921.

May 9, 1921. Cuba–United States. President-Elect Zayas of Cuba announced desire to negotiate modification of commercial treaty now in force.-N. Y. Times, May 10, 1921, p. 2; Am. Jour. Int. Law, July, 1921.

May 10, 1921. Netherlands United States. Dutch Government's reply to American note concerning Djambi oil fields in Sumatra sent to Washington.-N. Y. Times, May 12, 1921, p. 4. Sunimary revised by Department State on May 12.-N. Y. Times, May 13, 1921, p. 16; Am. Jour. Int. Law, July, 1921.

May 11, 1921. Korea United States. Appeal for recognition of Korean independence addressed to Secretary Hughes by Soon Hyun, diplomatic representative of Korea.-Wash. Post, May 12, 1921, p. 1; N. Y. Times, May 12, 1921, p. 4; Am. Jour. Int. Law, July, 1921.

May 11, 1921. Argentina-United States. Agreement reached at Buenos Aires for solution of difficulties causing boycott of Munson Line Steamship, Martha Washington, on March 29.-N. Y. Times, May 12, 1921, p. 8; Am. Jour. Int. Law, July, 1921.

May 14, 1921. Great Britain United States. Preliminary discussion incident to resumption of negotiations for funding into long time obligations of Great Britain's $5,000,000,000 debt to United States, began in Washington.-Evening Star, May 15, 1921; Am. Jour. Int. Law, July, 1921.

May 14, 1921. Peru—United States. State Department sent note of inquiry to Peru regarding recent concession to Marconi Wireless Telegraph Company.-Wash. Post, May 16, 1921, p. 6; Am. Jour. Int. Law, July, 1921.

May 17-19, 1921. Disarmament Congress. Held in Chicago.-N. Y. Times, May 18, 1921, p. 2. It adopted resolution on May 19, urging the President to invite Great Britain and Japan to an immediate conference looking toward limitation of naval armaments.-N. Y. Times, May 20, 1921, p. 17; Am. Jour. Int. Law, July, 1921.

May 18, 1921. Poland United States. Appeal of Poland of May 11, for support in Upper Silesian controversy and American reply of May 14 made public.Text of both notes, Press Notice May 18, 1921; Wash. Post, May 19, 1921, p. 1; Am. Jour. Int. Law, July, 1921.

May 18, 1921. Japan-League of Nations. Negative reply received at League Secretariat from Japan to proposal for disarmament adopted by the League of Nations Assembly.-Wash. Post, May 19, 1921, p. 1; Am. Jour. Int. Law, July, 1921.

May 19, 1921. Immigration Restriction Bill. H. R. 4075 approved by President Harding. Public No. 5-67 Congress.-Am. Jour. Int. Law, July, 1921.

May 19, 1921. Cable License Bill. S. 535, giving President authority over cables landing on American shores, signed by President Harding Cong. Rec., June 1, 1921, p. 1940; Am. Jour. Int. Law, July, 1921.

May 23, 1921. Trading with the Enemy Act. War Trade Board Section of the Department of State announced amendment to General Enemy Trade License, effective May 23, authorizing all persons in United States to trade and communicate with all persons with whom trade and communication is prohibited by the Trading with the Enemy Act, subject to certain limitations.—War Trade Board R. 849; Am. Jour. Int. Law, July, 1921.

May 28, 1921. Japan-United States. Reply of Japan to Secretary Hughes letter to the Powers of April 6 received at State Department. N. Y. Times, May 24, 1921, p. 5; Am. Jour. Int. Law, July, 1921.

May 23-30, 1921. Austria. Plan to save Austria as a nation submitted to Financial Committee of League of Nations at a meeting in London, subject to ratification by Allied Governments and United States.-Wash. Post, May 24, 1921, p. 5. Summary of work.-N. Y. Times, May 31, 1921, p. 17; Am. Jour. Int. Law, July, 1921.

May 25, 1921. Central American Union. Pact signed on January 19, 1921 sent to League of Nations for registration.-Evening Star, May 26, 1921; Am Jour. Int. Law, July, 1921.

May 26, 1921. Sanitary Convention, Paris, December 3, 1903. Denunciation by United States May 26, 1921.-Cong. Rec., May 26, 1921, p. 1798; Am. Jour. Int. Law, July, 1921.

May 26, 1921. China--United States. Treaty of October 20, 1920, confirming application of a 5 per cent ad valorem rate of duty to imports of American goods into China by citizens of the United States, ratified by United States Senate.--Text Cong. Rec., May 26, 1921, p. 1791; Am. Jour. Int. Law, July, 1921.

May 27 to June 8, 1921. Mexico United States. Proposed treaty of commerce and amity presented to President Obregon on May 27 by American Chargé d'Affaires at Mexico City. Statement of policy issued

by Secretary Hughes on June 8, 1921.—Text, Wash. Post, June 8, 1921, p. 1; Am. Jour Int. Law, July, 1921.

May 30, 1921. Canada–United States. Tariff corresponding to United States Emergency measure put into effect in Canada.-N. Y. Times, May 31, 1921, p. 17; Am. Jour. Int. Law, July, 1921.

June 1, 1921. Netherlands United States. Arrival of new note from United States on oil question announced at Hague.-N. Y. Times, June 2, 1921, p. 12; Am. Jour. Int. Law, July, 1921.

June 1, 1921. Chinese Consortium. Text of notes and memorandum relating to the consortium and text of agreement of October 15, 1920, made public.-Nation (N. Y.), June 1 and 8, 1921; Am. Jour. Int. Law, July, 1921.

June 2, 1921. Permanent Court of International Justice. SecretaryGeneral of League of Nations sent circular to members of League asking them to nominate candidates for membership in the court.-Wash. Post, June 3, 1921, p. 5; Am. Jour. Int. Law, July, 1921.

REPORT

OF THE

COMMITTEE ON JURISPRUDENCE AND LAW REFORM. To the American Bar Association:

Your committee has carefully considered the various subjects that have been referred to it by the Association and by the Executive Committee, and reports as follows:

1. REMOVAL OF CAUSES. At the meeting of the Association in 1920 your committee was instructed to bring to the attention of Congress and to request the introduction and passage of a bill amending Section 28 of the Judicial Code of the United States, in reference to the district to which a cause removed from the state court should be removed for trial. Controversy had arisen as to the definition of the words “proper district” in the section referred to and it was deemed by your committee that the addition of the following clause would remove any doubt upon the subject: “In all cases of removal where the defendant is not a resident of the state, district or division of the district, in which suit is brought, the District Court of the United States for the proper district shall be the one having jurisdiction in the district or division thereof where suit is brought.”

A very extended examination of the diverse decisions on the subject, which has been made by a member of the Association, Mr. Charles A. Boston, who has assisted us materially in this matter, has led us to the conclusion that it would be wise to add to this proposed amendment the words—“Notwithstanding any provision of Section 51 of this Act.” Some of the courts of the United States have held that notwithstanding the express provision of Section 28 on the subject of removal, the right of removal was limited by the provisions of Section 51, conferring original jurisdiction upon the federal district courts. This provides:

Where the jurisdiction is founded only on the fact that the action is between citizens of different states, suits shall be brought only in the district of the residence of either the plaintiff or the defendant.

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