The Invisible Flâneuse?: Gender, Public Space, and Visual Culture in Nineteenth-century Paris

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Aruna D'Souza, Tom McDonough
Manchester University Press, 2006 - Art - 185 pages
This collection of essays revisits gender and urban modernity in nineteenth-century Paris in the wake of changes to the fabric of the city and social life. In rethinking the figure of the flâneur, the contributors apply the most current thinking in literature and urban studies to an examination of visual culture of the period, including painting, caricature, illustrated magazines, and posters. Using a variety of approaches, the collection re-examines the long-held belief that life in Paris was divided according to strict gender norms, with men free to roam in public space while women were restricted to the privacy of the domestic sphere.

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Contents

Introduction
1
Gender and the haunting of cities or the retirement of the flâneur
18
Women in public the display of femininity in the parks of Paris
32
Dusting the surface or the bourgeoise the veil and Haussmanns Paris
49
Disorienting Orient Duret and Guimet anxious flâneurs in Asia
65
Transcrypts some notes between pricks
79
Not the flâneur again reading magazines and living the metropolis around 1880
94
The flâneuse in French findesiècle posters advertising images of modern women in Paris
113
Why the Impressionists never painted the department store
129
City of strangers
148
The contemporary flâneuse
164
Afterword
172
Select bibliography
178
Index
183
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Aruna D'Souza and Tom McDonough are both Assistant Professors of Art History at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

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