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HIS CORRESPONDENCE WITH THE MINISTERS OF STATE

IN GREAT-BRITAIN AND PORTUGAL ;

A SHORT SKETCH

OF THE

HISTORY OF IRELAND,

PARTICULARLY AS IT RESPECTS THE SPIRIT OF BRITISH

DOMINATION IN THAT COUNTRY ;

ÁND

A FEW OBSERVATIONS

ON THE STATE OF MANNERS, &c. IN AMERICA.

New - York :

PRINTED FOR THE AUTHOR, BY GEORGE FORMAN, 64, WATER-STREET, NEAR OLD-SLÍT.

District of New York, Sss.

BE IT REMEMBERED, that on the Eighteenth day of November, in the thirty-second Year of the Independence of the United States of America ; William Sampson of the said District hath deposited in this Office, the title of a Book, the right whereof he

claims as Author, in the words following, to wit:

MEMOIRS OF WILLIAM SAMPSON; Încluding particulars of his adventures in various parts of Europe ; his confinement in the Dungeons of the Inquisition in Lisbon, &c. &c. several original Letters, being his correspondence with the Ministers of state in Great-Britain and Portugal; a short sketch of the History of Ireland, particularly as it respects the spirit of British domination in that country, and a few observations on the state of manners, &c. in America.

In Conformity to the Act of the Congress of the United States entitled “ An Act for the Encouragement of Learning by securing the copies of Maps, Charts, and Books, to the Authors and Proprietors of such copies during the time therein mentioned.” And also to an Act entitled “. An Act supplementary to an Act, entitled an Act for the Encouragement of Learning by securing the copies of Maps, Charts, and Books to the Authors and Proprietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned; and extending the benefits thereof to the Arts of designing, engraving and etching historical and other Prints.!

EDWARD DUNSCOMB,
Clerk of the District of New-York.

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THE

HE Author, without apology, submits his Memoirs to that nation where truth can be uttered without alloy.

To the idolaters of English power, some of whom motives have too strong for truth to shake, he is aware that his work will not be pleasing. But he knows, that the genius of America is not that of persecution ; and that although for ten years past, terror and corruption have been able to silence the vindicators of the Irish cause; yet it needs but to be known to find favor with the just and generous of every country.

The printing presses of Ireland have been lawlessly demolished, and all who dare write or speak the truth, have been hunted to destruction ; whilst scouts and hirelings, paid from the Irish treasury, have been maintained in the repotest regions of the earth, to slander Ireland ; yet all this has not been sufficient to reconcile the minds of thinking people to the idea of a nation of rebels, or a kingdom out of a king's peacé. For if a government be so manifestly against a

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