The child of the English savage, by the cardinal archbishop of Westminster and B. Waugh. (London soc. for the prevention of cruelty to children).

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Page 14 - ... magistrate understand the nature of an oath, the evidence of such child may be received, though not given under oath, if, in the opinion of the court or magistrate, such child is possessed of sufficient intelligence to justify the reception of the evidence. But no person shall be held or convicted of an offense upon such testimony unsupported by other evidence.
Page 14 - Whenever in any criminal proceedings a child actually or apparently under the age of twelve years offered as a witness does not in the opinion of the court or magistrate understand the nature of an oath, the evidence of such child may be received though not given under oath if, in the opinion of the court or magistrate, such child is possessed of sufficient intelligence to justify the reception of the evidence. But no person shall be...
Page 3 - God," it lost the light of self-knowledge, of brotherhood, and of duty. It was Christianity that revealed our Father's kingdom and the inheritance of His children. " God, who commanded the light to shine out of darkness, hath shined in our hearts, to give the light of the knowledge of the Glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ " (2 Cor. iv. 6). This light shone from the Child Jesus. The love of Fatherhood...
Page 14 - Where, upon the hearing of a charge under this section, the girl in respect of whom the offence is charged to have been committed, or any other child of tender years, who is tendered as a witness, does not, in the opinion of the court...
Page 8 - ... could not raise a limb. Her bones almost protruded through the bed-sores which added misery to her misery. Happily, during many of the last days through which she lay in darkness and bitter cold, while actual death was slowly taking place, unconsciousness must have been as kindly to her as death : she possibly felt nothing, but gently breathed herself away. Downstairs sat the pair with whom she had lived from her birth — her father and mother. They brought her no share of their tea nor crumb...
Page 10 - SAVAGE. of child-life, law should lack neither sharpness nor certainty, and at present it lacks both. Again we urge that it is not the humble fellow, with the short black pipe in his mouth, loitering with slovenly gait at the street corner, with whom the friends of child-life and happiness hare to contend. Too often it is with well-spoken, well-dressed men, who would call him but an animal (and to his credit be it said, he does not disgrace the name) ; and who will discuss with you " superstitions...
Page 9 - ... through days and nights, having no comfort till the little sick thing is well again, and who feel when it is dead and gone that they must lie down and die themselves, such a story seems simply impossible. But unhappily these harrowing particulars have all been proved, and have been admitted too, by the accused parents in a court of law. Yet, how much of this horrible guilt is society's ! While the two deaths were taking place, and it was vaguely known that a second child was going the way of...
Page 13 - A little while ago there might have been seen a small girl of nine years old, who had suffered greatly from her father's hand before she reluctantly told the tale which got him into prison, now standing at his prison door. It is the morning of her father's release. No one is with her ; she is alone, and shivers as the cold April wind lifts her poor thin garments and her hair, for she is without any covering to her head. She has loved and dwelt with him all her days, she will love and dwell with him...
Page 12 - ... by a clean hearth and singing kettle, knitting her stockings. The only fault of the father seemed to be that he had neither much heart nor will of his own, and he cared more for being at peace with his masterful wife than for the unendurable miseries of his almost perishing son. Happily, the boy was constitutionally strong, and in the cottage hospital to which he was removed, after a critical time (in which more than once life seemed gone from him), he made flesh; and when he left his bed he...
Page 12 - Such was the kindly heart of the miserable victim of this female spite that it was with the greatest reluctance he answered the questions which brought the mercilessness of his persecution to light And his is the common disposition of little sufferers from cruelty, and the fact constitutes one of the difficulties which beset attempts to bring their abusers to justice. Few of them are ready to accuse, many are ready to forgive ; they are friends of their abusers, with a friendship far closer than...

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