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LIST OF

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1 Ornamental Title Page

2 Ornamental Border. From Muminated MS. of the period

3 James I. From a Painting by Vandyke

4 Initial Letter

5 Coronation of James i. From a Dutch Print, dated 1663

6 Anne of Denmark, Queeu of James I. From a Painting by

Cornelius

11

7 House of the Gunpowder Conspirators at Lambeth. 'From

an old Print

21

8 The Gunpowder Conspirators. Prom a Print published im:

23

9 Vault beneath the Old House of Lords. From in origina!

24

10 Pac-simile and superscription of the Letter to Lord Mouni

eagle

26

11 The Autographs of Guido Fawkes, before and afier Torture

12 Hendlip House, as it stood in 1800

13 Hall at Theobalds. the favourite residence of James I. From

an Original Picture at Hinton St. George

34

14 St. James's Palace and City of Westminster, From an An.

cient Picture in Nichols's Progresses

42

15 Prince Henry and Lord Harrington. From an old Picture

at Earl Guilford's, Wroxton

50

16 Earl and Countess of Somerset. 'From a Print of the period 61

17 The Tower of London. From a Print published by the

Royal Antiquarian Society

76

18 Great Seal of James I

86

19 James 1. lying in State in Westminster Abbey

20 Great Seal of Charles I.

109

21 Charles 1. painted by vandyke, as a Model for the Bust

sculptured by Bernini

110

22 Queen Henrietta Maria. From a Painting by vandyke 115

23 Port of Rochelle, 1650. From a French Print

129

24 House at Portsmouth in which the Duke of Buckingham

was assassinated

137

25 The Old Star Chamber, Westminster

143

26 St. Giles's and the Old 'l'ron Church, Edinburgh, ia the time

of Charles I. From an Old Print

188

27 Edinburgh. As it appeared during the early part of the

Seventeenth Century

184

28 Charles I. and Armour Bearer. 'Vandyke :

225

29 Cheapside, with the procession of Mary de Medicis on her

visit to Charles J. and his Queen. From La Serres's

" Entrée Royale de Regne Mère du Roi," 1638

30 Dublin. Temp. Charles I. From an Old Print

31 Castle at Hall. Temp. Charles I. From an Old Plan of

the Town

278

32 York. Micklebar-gaie, with the arrival of a Royalisi Bag-

-

287

33 Prince Rupert's House, Barbican, London; as it appeared

before its recent demolition

295

34 Reading, from Caversham Hill. ' From an Oja Print : . 301

35 John Lilburpe. From an Old Print

36 Newark Castle. From an Original Drawing

305

37 Gloucester. From an Old Print

300

38 Newbury; Donnington Castle in the distance. From an

Old Print

307

39 Plan of Oxford, with the Lines raised for its deferice by

Charles I. From an Old Print, by Anthony Wood 314

40 Uxbridge, showing to the right the House (called the Treaty

House) in which the Commissioners held their Sittings : 328

41 Obelisk on Naseby Field ; erected to commemorate the

Battle. From an unpublished Lithograph

334

42 Fac-simile of a portion of the Letter written by Cromwell to

Lenthall, Speaker to the House of Commons, announcing

the victory of Naseby. Engraved from the original in the

Harleian Collection of MSS. British Museum, No. 7502 , 335

43 Anderson's Place, Newcastle. The House in which

Charles was delivered to the Parliamentary Troops.

From an Original Drawing made before its demolition in

1836

360

: 44 Carisbrook Castie. In its present state. from an originai

380

45 Remains of Colchester Casile. From an Original Drawing 383

Page

46 Trial of Charles I. From a Print in Nalson's Report of the

Trial, 1694

390

47 The George worn by Charles I. From the Original Prini

by Hollar

398

48 Great Seal of the Commonwealth

49 Ruins of Dunbar Castle. From an Original Drawing.

50 Worcester. From an Old Print in the British Museum

51 Cromwell Dissolving the Long Parliament. From a Paint-

ing by Benjamin West

411

52sThe Protector Oliver Cromwell.

Picture by Walker,

in the British Museum .

413

53 Defeat of the Dutch Fleet by Blake, Dean, and Monk.

From a Painting by Cleverly

415

54 Cromwell's Great Seal for Scotland

422

55 Oliver Cromwell's Wife. From an Anonymous Print, in

which she is styled " Protectress and a Drudge"

423

56 Richard Cromwell. From a Miniature by Cooper

428

57 Autograph of James I. Harleian MSS.

432

58

Charles I.

432

59

Oliver, Protector

432

60

Richard, Protector

432

61 Gronp of Portraits, including Abbot, Taylor, Fox, Laud,

and Usher

433

62 Initial Letter

433

63 Procession of vimes I. to St. Paul's

, accompanied by the

Prince of Wales and many of the Nobility, on Sunday,

March 26, 1620

475

64 St. Paul's Cross. From a Painting of the Period.

476

65 Sermon at St. Paul's Cross on Good Friday. From a Draw.

ing in the Pepysian Library

492

66 Puritans Destroying the Cross in Cheapside. From a con

temporary Print in the Pennant Collection, Brit. Mus. 492

67 Charles II. and the English Ambassadors at the Hague.

From a Print by Vleit

494

68 Group of Portraits, including Cecil, Prynne, Treton, Pym, and

Wentworth

495

69 Initial Letter

495

70 Medal Struck in Honour of the Earl of Essex

515

71 Initial Letter

79 The Custom House, London, as it appeared before the Great

Fire. From a Print by Hollar

527

73 The Great Cloth-Market, Leeds. From a Print in the

King's Library, British Museum

529

74 Hackney-Coaches. From Bratu, and various Prints and

Paintings of the Period .

543

75 Sedan-Chairs. From Prints and Paintings of the Period

76 London before the Great Fire. From the print by Hollar 545

77 Thirty-Shilling Piece of James I.

550

78 Sovereign of ditto

530

79 Fifteep-Shilling Piece or diito

550

80 Half Sovereign of ditto

550

81 Crown of ditto

550

82 Shilling of ditto

550

83 Sixpence of ditto

550

84 Twopence of ditto

550

85 Penny of ditto

530

86 Halfpenny of ditto

550

87 Twenty.Shilling Piece of Charles I.

551

88 Ten-Shilling Piece of ditto

331

89 Angel of ditto

90 Oxford Crown of ditto

551

91 York Halfcrown of ditto

: 92 Shilling of ditto

93 Sixpence of ditto

553

94 Puurpence of ditto

95 Penny of ditto

553

96 Halfpenny of ditto

553

97 Scarborough Halserown of ditto

553

98 Breston Castle Shilling of ditto

53,3

99 Colchester Shilling of ditto

100 Newark Shilling of ditto

553

101 Twenty-Shilling Piece of the Commonwealth

102 Ten Shilling Piece of ditto

103 Crown of ditto.

555

. 527

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104 Shilling Piece of the Commonwealth

555

105 Sixpence of ditto

555

106 Two-pence of ditto

555

107 Penny of ditto

555

108 Halfpenny of ditto

555

109 Cupper Farthing of ditto

555

110 Pewter Farthing of ditto

111 Crown of Oliver Cromwell

556

112 Shilling of ditto.

556

113 Sixpence of ditto

556

114 Farthing of ditto

536

115 Grafting and Praning Implements

539

116 Husbandry Implements

559

117 Group of Portraits, including Camden, Inigo Jones, 'Shak-

speare, Raleigh, and Bacou

560

118 Initial Letter

560

119 luigo Jones's design or whitehall. The Front towards the

Park

571

120 Do. The Front towards Charing Cross

571

121 Plan and Elevation of the Portico of Old St. Paul's

122 House in Great Queen Street

574

123 House standing in Little Moorfields

. 575

124 House formerly standing in Long Lane, Smithfield

575

125 Sir Dudley Carleton's Monument, Westminster Abbey 576

126 Sutton's Monument at the Charter House

576

127 Shakspeare's Burial-place and Monument, Stratford-upon-

Avon Church. From an Original Drawing

591

128 Head of Newspaper of the Period, 1640

129 Public Reading Room

616

130 Initial Letter

131 Furniture of the sixteenth Ceniury. Selected from Speci.

mens and Prints of the Period

617

132

Ditto

133

Ditto

618

134

Ditto

Ditto

136

Ditto

622

137 James I.'s Bed Room at Knole, Kent

138 James I.'s Cradle. From a Print in Nichols's Progresses 622

139 Henry Prince of Wales. From Drayton's Polyolbion 623

140 English Lady of Quality. Hollar's Ornatus Muliebris,

1640

623

141 Anne of Denmark, Queen of James I. From Strutt

623

142 Gentlewoman. From Strutt

623

143 Merchant's Wife of London. Hollar's Ornatus' Muliebris,

1640

624

144 Lady Mayoress of London: Hullar's Theairum Mulierum624

145 Citizen's Wife of London.

624

146 Countrywoman with Mufiles. Speed's Map of England 624

147 Oliverian or Puritan. Jeffrey's Dresses

625

148 Cavalier, 1620. From a Specimen at Goodrich Court, en-

graved in Skelton's Armour

625

149 Musketeer, 1603. From ditto

625

150 Cuirassier, 1645. Frum ditto

625

151 Dragoon, 1645. From ditto

626

152 Helmets, 1645. From ditto

626

153 Infantry Armour, 1645. From dit:o

627

154 Pikeman, 1635. From ditto

627

153 Paul's Walk

627

156 James I. and attendants hawking. From "A Jewell for

Gentrie," 1614

640

157 Tennis Court. From Commenius's

" Orbis Sensualium

Pictus," 1658.

640

158 Pall Mall, in St. James's Park. From a Picture of the

period, engraved in Carter's " Westminster"

641

159 Billiards, from“ School of Recreation,” 1710

641

160 Initial Letter

650

161 Ornamental Border

.661

162 Great Seal of Charles II.

662

163 Initial Letter

662

164 Landing of Charles II. ai Dover. From a Painting by

West

663

165 Charles 11. From a Picture by Sir Godfrey Kneller 665

166 Old Horse Guards, St. James's Park. From a Painting by

Canaletti

680

167 Market Cross of Edinburgh ; Execution of Argyie. From

Drawing of the time

682

169 Catherine of Braganza. From an Original Painting in the

Pepysian Library

696

169 Dunkirk. From a Print of the period

692

170 Pest-House in Tothill Fields, Westminster. From a Print by

Hollar.

695

171 The Broad Stone, East Retford, Nottinghamshire. From aii

697

172 London, as it appeared from Bankside, Southwark, during

the great Fire. From a Print of the period, by Visscher , 699

Page

173 Monument on Fish-street Hill. From an Old Print

700

174 Dutch Fleet in the Medway: Buruing of Sheerness. From

a Drawing of the time of Charles II.

702

175 Clarenduu llouse ; arrival of the King in State. From Prints

of the period .

176 Jewel House in the Tower. From an Original Drawing . 70

177 Medal struck to commemorate the Popisli Plot. From the

Original in the British Museum

718

178-9 Medals struck to commemorate ihe Murder or Sir E.

Godfrey. From the Originals in the British Museum 720

180 Buckingham House, from the Thames, with the celebrated

Water gate by Inigo Jones. From an old Print

722

191 Palace of Windsor. From a Print of the period in Kip's

Delices de la Grande Bretagne

183 Oxford. From a Drawing by ilollar : :

734

184 Rye House. From an Old Print

742

185 Bass Rock, with the Prisons of the Covenanters

757

186 Whitehall and adjoining Buildings, with a Royal Aquatic

Procession. From Pictures of the period engraved in

Smith's “ Westmiuster"

759

187 Great Seal of James 11.

763

188 James 11. From a Picture by Sir G. Kneller

764

189 Westminster Hall and Abbey from St. James's Park. From

a Print by Tempest

765

190 Maria Beatrix of Modena, Queen of James II. Proma Pic:

ture by Sir Peter Lely

191 Exeter. From an Original Drawing :

782

192 St. Stephen's Chapel and the Parliamentary Buildings of

Westminster. From old Pictures and Prints of the

period

784

193 Medal struck in honour of the Petitioning Bishops. From
a specimen in the British Museum

791
194 Lady Place, Hurley ·
195 Vaults of Lady Place

795
196 Embarkation of the Prince of Orange at Helvoetsluys 797
197 Landing of William III. at Torbay. From a Print after
Stothard

793
198 Portsmouth

800
199 Autograph of Charles II. From Original in Harleian Li-
brary

801
200 Autograph of James II. From an Original in Harleian
Library.

801
201 Group of Portraits, including Leighton, Hail, Burnet,
Buuyan, Barrow, and Owen

903
202 Initial Letter
203 The Savoy Palace in 1661.' From Visscher's London 991
204 Bothwell Bridge. From an Original Drawing

838
205 Tuitial Letter

899
206 Group of Portraits, including Clarendon, Lauderdale, Hali.
fax, Sunderland, Hale, and Croke

830
207 Group of Portraits, including Sir Dudley North, Dr. Dave.
nant, and Sir Joshua Child

850
208 Initial Letter

850
209 Lighthouse erected at Porismouth in 1665. From a Print
by Kip :

858
210 Medal-exhibiting a first-rate ship.of-war-struck to com-

memorate the appointment of James, Duke of York, as
Lord High Admiral

864
211 Coaches of the time of Charles Ii. Selected from Prints

864

212 Conduit erected in Leadenhall in 1655. From “ Moxon's

Use of the Globes," 1659

866

213 Guinea of Charles II.

214 Crown of ditto

89

215 Shilling of ditto

86

216 Halfpenny of ditto

86

217 Crown of James II.

218 Halfpenny of ditto

86

219 Group of Portraits, including Milton, Temple, Hobbes, Ray.
Dryden, Boyle

87
220 Initial Letter

87
221 Initial Letter

. 88
222 Library Furniture

88
323 Sitting-room Furniture. From Specimens in Private Col-
lections

89
224 Soft
Stools, and Cabinets. From dito

89
225 Sideboard, with Plate. From ditto
226 State-Bed, Dressing-Case, &c. From ditto

89
227 Costume of the Commonalty, temp. Charles 1i. Selected
from Prints by Hollar and Silvester, 1664

89
228 Costume of the Nobility and Gentry, temp. Charles Ii. Se

lected from Ogilby's Coronation of Charles II., 1662; and
Prints by Silvester, 1664

89
229 Costume of the Nobility and Gentry, temp. James II. se-

lected from Sandford's Coronation of James 11., 1687 89
230 Bear-Garden, Southwark. From Visscher's London
231 Initial Letter

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S soon as Eliza March, and posted down to Scotland, in order to be
beth breathed her the first to hail James Stuart as king of England.
last, Lady Scrope, This tender relative arrived at Edinburgh on the
a daughter of her night of Saturday the 26th, four days before Sir
relative, the late Charles Percy and Thomas Somerset, Esq., who were
Lord Hunsdon, dispatched by the council; but it was agreed with
communicated the James to keep the great matter a secret, until the
intelligence to her formal dispatch from London should reach him.*
brother, Sir Ro Sir Robert Carey had scarcely taken horse for the
bert Carey, who
had been on the

In Lodge's Illustrations of British History there is a letter to the

king from one John Ferrour, who claims to have been " prime mes. watch; and who,

senger of glad tidings about the decease of Queen Elizabeth," and

begs a reward for that good service. But we can scarcely agere with anticipating Cecil

Mr. Lodge in taking this letter as a proof that the old story told by and the other lords

Sir Robert Carey himself, in his Memoirs, and by Stow as well as

Weldon, about 'Sir Robert Carey is incorrect. We are not iuformed of the council, stole that Ferrour's claim was allowed. This man may have fancied him.

self prime messenger ." without being so. We know that sereral

out of the palace enger courtiers ran a race to Edinburgh, and that James thoughe well at Richmond, where the queen had expired at three

to conceal their arrival. Afterwards, when all was settled, there

would be no motive for keeping up the mystery, and then the court o'clock on the morning of Thursday, the 24th of seems to have given the honour to Sir Robert.

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north when Cecil, Nottingham, Egerton, and others, had been the able management of Cecil-such was met in secret debate at Richmond, at an early hour, the readiness of the nation to acknowledge the before the queen's death was known; and these Scottish king, or their laudable anxiety to avoid a lords,“ knowing above all things delays to be disputed succession and civil war. most dangerous, proceeded at once to London, and There was one person, however, whose claim drew up a proclamation in the name of the lords excited uneasiness in the cautious mind of Cecil, — spiritual and temporal, united and assisted with the this was the Lady Arabella Stuart, daughter of the late queen's council

, other principal gentlemen, the Earl of Lennox, younger brother of James's father, lord mayor, aldermen, and citizens of London, a Darnley, and descended equally from the stock of multitude of other good subjects and commons of Henry VII.* This young lady was by birth an the realm.” This proclamation bore thirty-six Englishwoman, a circumstance which had been signatures, the three first being those of Robert considered by some as making up for her defect of Lee, Lord Mayor of London, the Archbishop of primogeniture, for James, though nearer, was a Canterbury, and the Lord Keeper Egerton; the born Scotchman and alien. Cecil for some time three last, those of Secretary Sir Robert Cecil, Sir had had his eye upon the Lady Arabella, and she J. Fortescue, and Sir John Popham. It was signed was now safe in his keeping. Eight hundred and ready about five hours after Elizabeth's decease; dangerous or turbulent persons, indistinctly deand then those who had signed it went out of the scribed as vagabonds,” were seized in two nights council chamber at Whitehall, with Secretary Cecil in London, and sent to serve on board the Dutch at their head, who had taken the chief direction of fleet. No other outward precautions were deemed the business, and who, in the front of the palace, necessary by the son of Burghley, who calmly read to the people the proclamation, which assured waited the coming of James and his own great rethem that the queen's majesty was really dead, and ward, without asking for any pledge for the prithat the right of succession was wholly in James / vileges of parliament, the liberties of the people, or King of Scots, now King of England, Scotland, the reform of abuses which had grown with the France, and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, &c. growing prerogative of the crown. But these were They then went to the High Cross in Cheapside, things altogether overlooked, not only by Cecil and where Cecil again read the proclamation, most

“most Nottingham and those who acted with them, but distinctly and audibly;" and when he had done, also by the parties opposed to them, the most re“the multitude with one consent cried aloud, markable man among whom was Sir Walter Ra'God save King James !"" for all parties, or rather leigh, who, like all the other courtiers or statesmen, the three great religious sects, High Churchmen, looked entirely to his own interest or aggrandizePuritans, and Papists, all promised themselves ad ment. Few or none could have been insensible to vantages from his accession. Cecil next caused the advantage likely to accrue from the peaceful three heralds and a trumpeter to proclaim the said union of England and Scotland under one sovereign, tidings within the walls of the Tower, where the with the cessation of those border wars which kept heart of many a state-prisoner leaped for joy, and both sides of the Tweed in perpetual turmoil and where the Earl of Southampton, the friend of the confusion; and it may be that this bright prospect unfortunate Essex, joined the rest in their signs of tended (together with the bright hope of personal great gladness. After consulting for a time in advancement) to render the English statesmen subSheriff Pemerton's house, they sent notice of the servient and careless at this important crisis. happy and peaceable proceeding into the country, Between the spiritual pride and obstinacy of his and to the authorities in the provincial towns; but clergy, the turbulent, intriguing habits of his notwithstanding the expedition of the messengers, nobles, and his own poverty, James had led rather many gentlemen got secret intelligence beforehand, a hard life in Scotland. He was eager to take posand, in divers places, James had been proclaimed session of England, which he looked upon as the without order or warrant.* Of the other thirteen very Land of Promise; but so poor was he that he or fourteen conflicting claims to the succession could not begin his journey until Cecil sent him which had been reckoned up at different times down money. He asked for the crown jewels of during Elizabeth's reign, not one appears to have England for the queen his wife; but the council been publicly mentioned, or even alluded to; and did not think fit to comply with this request; and, the right of James, though certainly not indisputable, was allowed to pass unquestioned. Such Edward Seymour, Earl of Hertford, to whom it was asserted that she

had been privately married. But that any such marriage took place was never satisfactorily proved. The boy in question, howerer, was

called by his father's second title of Lord Beauchamp; and his eldest • Stow.-Weldon.-Osborne. Memoirs of Sir Robert Carey. son, previously kuown as Earl and Marquis of Heriford, -the same

The only pretensions, however, that could with any show of law who married the Lady Arabella Stuart, to be presently mentioned, orienson come into competition with those of James, were those of was restored to the tiile of Duke of Somerset in 1660. Whatever the representative of Henry VIII.'s younger sister Mary. Duchess of c'aim the House of Suffolk might have to the crown was allerwards Suffolk, to whose heirs llenry was affirmed by his will to have transferred to the present Pukes of Northumberland, by the marriage limited the succession on failure of the heirs of his three children. of Elizabeth, daughter of the eighih Duke of Somerset, with Sir Hugh But although this will, having been made under the authority of an Smithson, the first Duke of Northumberland of the last creation. act of parliament, would have been legally valid if authentic, it is James's claim, however, was not at all through his father Lord more than doubtful if it ever really received the royal sigoature. (See Darnley, but through his mother, wlio, as the grand-daughter of in support of its authenticity the reasoning of Mr. Hallam, Const. James IV. by his wife Margaret, eldest daughter of Henry VII., was, Hist. 1. 307-317; and the apparently conclusive reply of Dr. Lin. a!ter Elizabeth, the next representative of that king. The Lady gard, Hist. Eng. vol. vi. note L. edit. of 1838.) At the time of Arabella and her uncle Lord Darnley were descended from the samo the death of Queen Elizabeth, the supposed representative of the Margaret Tudor, but by her second marriage with Matthew Stuart, Duchess of Suffolk was the son of her grand-daughter Catherine, by

Earl of Lennox.

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