The Faerie Queene. Cantos I.-II., and the Prothalamion: With Prefatory and Explanatory Notes

Front Cover
Maynard, Merrill & Company, 1898

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 13 - Hehind her farre away a dwarfe did lag, That lasie seemd, in being ever last, Or wearied with bearing of her bag Of needments at his backe.
Page 12 - A lovely ladie rode him faire beside, Upon a lowly asse more white then snow, Yet she much whiter ; but the same did hide Under a vele, that wimpled was full low; And over all a blacke stole shee did throw : As one that inly mournd, so was she sad, And heavie sate upon her palfrey slow ; Seemed in heart some hidden care she had ; And by her in a line a milkewhite lambe she lad.
Page 11 - Crosse he bore, The deare remembrance of his dying Lord, For whose sweete sake that glorious badge he wore, And dead, as living, ever him ador'd : Upon his shield the like was also scor'd, For soveraine hope which in his helpe he had.
Page 14 - The Laurell, meed of mightie Conquerours And Poets sage ; the Firre that weepeth still : The Willow, worne of forlorne Paramours ; The Eugh, obedient to the benders will ; The Birch for shaftes ; the Sallow for the mill ; The Mirrhe sweete-bleeding in the bitter wound ; The warlike Beech ; the Ash for nothing ill ; The fruitful!
Page 25 - Morpheus house doth hastily repaire. Amid the bowels of the earth full steepe, And low, where dawning day doth never peepe, His dwelling is; there Tethys his wet bed Doth ever wash, and Cynthia still doth steepe In silver deaw his ever-drouping hed, Whiles sad Night over him her mantle black doth spred.
Page 52 - Where now the studious Lawyers have their bowers, There whylome wont the Templer Knights to byde, Till they decayd through pride : Next whereunto there standes a stately place, Where oft I gayned giftes and goodly grace Of that great Lord, which therein wont to dwell...
Page 5 - I have followed all the antique Poets historicall ; first Homere, who in the Persons of Agamemnon and Ulysses hath ensampled a good governour and a vertuous man, the one in his Ilias, the other in his Odysseis : then Virgil, whose like intention was to doe in the person of Aeneas...
Page 12 - Upon a great adventure he was bond, That greatest Gloriana to him gave...
Page 24 - Then choosing out few words most horrible, (Let none them read) thereof did verses frame ; With which, and other spelles like terrible, He bad awake blacke Plutoes griesly Dame ; And cursed heven ; and spake reprochful shame Of highest God, the Lord of life and light : A bold bad man, that dar'd to call by name Great Gorgon, prince of darknes and dead night ; At which Cocytus quakes, and Styx is put to flight.
Page 53 - Thames, run softly, till I end my song. From those high towers this noble lord issuing, Like radiant Hesper when his golden hair In th' Ocean billows he hath bathed fair, Descended to the river's open viewing, With a great train ensuing.

Bibliographic information