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From the Earliest Accounts of Time to the present Period,

WHIRLIN

Their remarkable ACTIONs and SUFFERINGS,

Their VIRTUES, PARTS, and LEARNING,

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LONDON,
PRINTED FOR W. STRAHAN, T. PAYNE AND SON, J. RIVING-
TON AND SONS,

w. OWEN, B. WHITE,
LOWNDES, B. LAW, J. ROBSON, J. JOHNSON, G. ROBINSON,
J. NICHOLS, J. MURRAY, W. GOLDSMITH, G. NICOL, p.
MACQUEEN, T. BOWLES, W. CHAPMAN, AND E, NEWSEXY,

MDCCLXXXIV.

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UNIVERSAL, HISTORICAL, and LITERARY

DICTION A R Y.

R.

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ofnis works

ADELAIS (FRANCIS), a celebrated French wit, Nireron, was the fon of an apothecary; and born about T. XXXII.

1483 at Chinon, in the province of Touraine. zable of He was bred up in a convcc of Franciscan friars in prelixed to Poictou, the convent of Fontenoy le Come; and re- an English ceived into their order. His itrong inclination and taite and for literature and the friences made him tranfcend the by Mr. bounds which restrained the learned in his times; foliuticaux, that he not only became a great linguist, bat an adept in

Lond. 1708,

in tiro vols. all branches of knowledge. His imcommo: capacity and 3vu. merit soon excited the jealouly of his brethreit. Henco he was envied by fome; others, through ignorance, thought hini 2 conjuror; and all hated an abaich hii, particularly because he studied Greck; the novelty of that language making them efteem it not only barbarous, but antichristian. This we colleat from a Greek cpiitle of Budæus to Rabelais, in which he praises him highly for his great knowledge in that tonguc, and exclaillis againit the stupidity and malice of the iriars.

Having endured their perfecutions for a long time, bo nbtained permission of pope Clement VII, "loo the fociety of St. Francis, and to enter into that of St. Bere net; but, his mercurial temper prevailing, he did not VOL. XI.

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find any more satisfaction among the Benedictines, than he had found among the Franciscans, so that after a short time he left them also. Changing the regular habit for that which is worn by secular priests, he rambled up and down for a while; and then fixed at Montpelier, where he took the degrees in physic, and practised with great reputation. He was infinitely admired for his great wit and great learning, and became a man of such weight and estimation, that the university of that place deputed him to Paris upon a very important errand. His reputation and character were spread through the kingdom; 1o that, when he arrived at Paris, the chancellor du Prat, moved with the extraordinary accomplishments of thc man, easily granted all that he solicited. He returned to Montpelier ; and the service he did the university upon this occasion is given as a reason, why all the candidates for degrees in physic there are, upon their admiilion to them, formally invefted with a robe, which Rabelais left: this ceremony having been instituted in honour of him.

In 1532, he published at Lyons fomne pieces of Hippocrates and Galen, with a dedication to the bishop of Maillezais; in which he tells him, that he had read lectures upon the aphorisms of Hippocrates, and the ars medica of Galen, before numerous audiences in the university of Montpelier. This was the latt year of his continuance in this place ; for the year after he went to Lyons, where he became physician to the hospital, and joined lectures with practice for some years following. John du Bellay, bishop of Paris, going to Rome in 1537, upon the businefs of our Henry VIII's divorce from Catherine of Spain, and passing through Lyons, carried Rabelais with him, in quality of his physician ; who returned however home in about six months. He had quitted his religious connexions, for the sake of leading a life more suitable to his taste and humour : but he afterwards renewed them, and in a second journey to Rome obtained in 1536, by his interest with some cardinals, a brief from pope Paul III, to qualify him for holding ecclefiaftical benefices. John du Bellay, made a cardinal in 1533, had procured the abbey of St. Maur near Paris to be secularized; and into this was Rabelais, now a Benedictine monk, received as a {ccalar caiion. Here he is supposed to have begun his famous romance, intituled, 56 The lives, heroic deeds, and

sayings of Gargantua and Pantagruel.” He continued in this retreat till 1545, when the cardinal du Belley, his

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