A History of Classical Scholarship, Volume 2

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At the University Press, 1908 - Classical philology

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Page 336 - To spend too much time in studies, is sloth; to use them too much for ornament, is affectation ; to make judgment wholly by their rules, is the humour of a scholar: they perfect nature, and are perfected by experience...
Page 337 - So that these four causes concurring, the admiration of ancient authors, the hate of the schoolmen, the exact study of languages, and the efficacy of preaching, did bring in an affectionate study of eloquence and copie of speech, which then began to flourish. This...
Page 435 - It was on the day, or rather night, of the 27th of June 1787, between the hours of eleven and twelve, that I wrote the last lines of the last page, in a summer-house in my garden. After laying down my pen I took several turns in a berceau, or covered walk of acacias, which commands a prospect of the country, the lake, and the mountains.
Page 337 - ... was enforced to awake all antiquity, and to call former times to his succours to make a party against the present time : so that the ancient authors, both in divinity and in humanity, which had long time slept in libraries, began generally to be read and revolved.
Page 337 - This kind of degenerate learning did chiefly reign amongst the school-men, who having sharp and strong wits, and abundance of leisure, and small variety of reading ; but their wits being shut up in the cells of a few authors (chiefly Aristotle their dictator) as their persons were shut up in the cells of monasteries and colleges, and knowing little history, either of nature or time, did out of no great quantity of matter, and infinite agitation of wit, spin out unto us those laborious webs of learning,...
Page 279 - ... breath's late exercise Had dealt too roughly with her tender throat, Yet summons all her sweet powers for a note. Alas, in vain! for while, sweet soul, she tries To measure all those wild diversities Of chatt'ring strings, by the small size of one Poor simple voice, raised in a natural tone, She fails, and failing grieves, and grieving dies. She dies, and leaves her life the victor's prize, Falling upon his lute; O fit to have, That lived so sweetly, dead, so sweet a grave!
Page 345 - When all these employments are well conquered, then will the choice histories, heroic poems, and Attic tragedies of stateliest and most regal argument with all the famous political orations offer themselves; which if they were not only read, but some of them got by memory and solemnly pronounced with right accent and grace as might be taught, would endue them even with the spirit and vigor of Demosthenes or Cicero, Euripides or Sophocles.
Page 436 - The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly have been produced by accident; so strong indeed, that no philologer could examine them all three, without believing them to have sprung from some common source, which, perhaps, no longer exists...
Page 435 - It was at Rome, on the 15th of October 1764, as I sat musing amidst the ruins of the Capitol, while the barefooted friars were singing vespers in the temple of Jupiter,* that the idea of writing the decline and fall of the city first started to my mind.
Page 434 - The discipline and evolutions of a modern battalion gave me a clearer notion of the phalanx and the legion; and the captain of the Hampshire grenadiers (the reader may smile) has not been useless to the historian of the Roman empire.

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