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MEMOIRS OF THE REFORMERS.

Cranmer

1,41, 81, 121

Jewel

- 161, 201
Grindal

241, 281, 321
Browne

361
Bale

401
Bradford

441
MISCELLANEOUS PAPERS.

SERMONS.

On the procuring Cause of Justi-

Roe, Rev. P. on Mortality

fication

336, 383
On Micah, vi. 8.
· 129 On Character

341
On Whitsunday
249 On Meditation and Prayer

369
Scott, Rev. John, on prevailing im-

On Colonial Slavery

410
morality

477 The Sovereignty of God connected

with an overruling Providence - 415
LETTERS.

MisceLLANEOUS.

Letter and Petition of Rev. J. I.

Papal Sketches

14, 52, 91

Holmes

23 Reflections on Canticles ii. 16. 18

To a Child on going to School 62 Reflections on a Birth Day

19

From S. S.

169 On taking Sunday School Children

Of the late Rev. Wm. Romaine 248

to Church

22

Of the late John Thornton, Esq. - 297

Final Judgment

51

Of the late Rev. R. De Courcy - 335 Rev. E. Ward's Annual Address 58

Collations of Ostervald's Bible 66

Rev. P. Roe's Annual Address 89

MEMOIRS, OBITUARIES, &c.

On Religion

101

John Leachman

76

Meditation on the Death of a Child 215

The Unspeakable Gift

· 102

On Female Character

135

A Tribute of Conjugal Affection 217

The Cross of Christ

The Irish Convert 299, 329, 372,417

Christian Compassion for Bargemen 139

Account of a Young Woman

405

The Seaman's Friend

The Cottage Visitor, No. XI. 464

140, 209

On Charitable Bequests

· 143

Hints to Professors

· 182

Essays.

On Titles of Honor

184, 258

On the Duties of Committee Men 49 On Meditation

255

On 1 Corinthians, xiii. 7.

56 Remarks on the Second Answer in

On the irreligious State of Bargemen 61 the Church Catechism 256, 370

On Worldly Conformity

64 On Coachmen and Guards

257

On Abstinence from Slave Produce 96 American Ministers and Places of

On promoting the Reformation in

Worship

259

Ireland

98 Popish Hostility to the Bible 264

On burning Hindoo Widows 103

The Harvest

338
On Roman Catholic Emancipation 180 A Dream

343

On the true Way to Eternal Life - 260 Observations on the Religious and

Youthful Piety

289

Moral state of Ireland

377

On Insincerity

293 The High Admiral's Order respect-

On the Influence of Joy and Grief 295 ing Religious books

- 407

On travelling for Health

303

Charge of Archbishop of York . 453

On the Difficulties of Human Life 327 On Meditation and Prayer

471

POETRY:

Patience in AMiction

13 The night blowing Cereus

344

Immortality of the Soul

90 On 2 Corinthians v. 8.

368

On Isaiah xl. 8.

· 144

Mark xiii. 37.

384

Trust in Providence

183 The Rainbow and New Wheat Ear 406

Thoughts in Affliction

216 The cleansed Leper

409

Evening

247 On seeing the Portrait of Rev. Legh

Christian Confidence

254

Richmond

416

Erin

304 Farewell to Hindoostan

452

To the Memory of J-K-g

328 The Vaudois

482

137

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234, 273, 280, 314, 320, 352, 359, 360, 395, 433, 437, 501

NOTICES AND ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 40, 80, 120, 160, 280, 320, 360, 400, 440, 512

ANNIVERSARY MEETINGS

200

LITERARY INTELLIGENCE

153, 432

PORTRAITS.

CRANMER

GRINDAL

BALE

BRADFORD

page

1

241

401

441

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CHRISTIAN GUARDIAN,

AND

Church of England Magazine.

JANUARY 1827.

MEMOIRS OF THE REFORMERS.

CRANMER THOMAS CRANMER, “ Primate of municative. He was employed in all England," and first protestant laying up a stock of useful knowArchbishop of Canterbury, was born ledge; extracting or making notes on the second of July, in the year of the valuable thoughts of different 1489, at Aslacton in Nottingham- authors in his common-place book, shire. He was of honourable Nor- and marking the numbers of the man extraction, and the seat of the divisions or pages in such works as family had been Cranmer Hall, in had paragraphs too long for tranLeicestershire. His father, who scription, but whose substance he gave him his own baptismal name, was desirous of committing to medied when he was yet in early child

mory.* hood; but he found a guardian and In 1525 he married, a gentleguide in his widowed mother, Ag- man's daughter. This measure, nes, of the race of the Hatfields, while it showed his protestant turn who sent him, at the age of four- of mind, lost him his fellowship; teen, to Cambridge, where his time but he was appointed divinitywas wasted in the subtleties of the reader in Buckingham College; schools till he was twenty-two. where he became very obnoxious His good sense and discrimination to the idle and ignorant friars, who, led him afterwards to the study of because his wife boarded with the the purest latin authors, while he hostess of the Dolphin Inn, to whom read at the same time with pleasure she was related, and he went thither and profit the writings of Faber frequently to visit her, spread a and Erasmus. He took the degree malicious report that he was no of Master of Arts, and was elected better than an ostler. His wife Fellow of Jesus College. The the- dying in child-bed, the college did ological controversies in Germany him the singular honour of once led him moreover to a diligent pe- more choosing him Fellow, though rusal of scripture; and when the it was contrary to the rules of the English monarch thought fit to University. This favour he so write against Luther, he was in- gratefully acknowledged, that when duced to examine some productions he was nominated to a Fellowship of that eminent reformer ; which in Cardinal Wolsey's new foundascrutiny was attended with a con- tion at Oxford, though the salary viction of the justness of his reason- was much more considerable, and ing, though, through that timidity the road to preferment more acand prudence which marked his cessible by the favour of that digcharacter in after-life, he did not openly avow his sentiments.

He

* Fox; Strype ; Melchior Adam. was rather observant than com- f Fuller's Hist. of Cambridge, p. 102.

JAN. 1827.

.

B

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