Essays

Front Cover
Luke Hansard, 1800 - 262 pages

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Contents

I
xxiii
II
13
IV
17
VI
21
VIII
28
IX
31
X
34
XI
36
XXVI
115
XXVII
132
XXVIII
151
XXX
155
XXXI
162
XXXII
167
XXXIV
170
XXXV
175

XII
43
XIV
48
XVI
52
XVII
54
XVIII
62
XX
67
XXI
87
XXIII
94
XXIV
96
XXV
107
XXXVII
178
XXXIX
178
XL
189
XLII
202
XLIII
210
XLIV
225
XLVI
228
XLVII
235
XLIX
237

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 67 - And also that every man should eat and drink, and enjoy the good of all his labour, it is the gift of God.
Page 115 - Knowledge and wisdom, far from being one, Have oft-times no connexion. Knowledge dwells In heads replete with thoughts of other men ; Wisdom in minds attentive to their own. Knowledge is proud that he has learned so much ; Wisdom is humble that he knows no more.
Page 115 - Where yet was ever found a mother, Who'd give her booby for another ? And should we change with human breed, Well might we pass for fools indeed.
Page 132 - But, withal, let my governor remember to what end his instructions are principally directed, and that he do not so much imprint in his pupil's memory the date of the ruin of Carthage, as the manners of Hannibal and Scipio; nor so much where Marcellus died, as why it was unworthy of his duty that he died there.
Page 74 - Proferpine for ever treads In paths unfeen, o'er our devoted heads ; And on the fpacious land, and liquid main, Spreads flow difeafe, or darts affliftive pain : Variety of deaths confirm her endlefs reign.
Page 60 - Deeper to wound, fhe fhuns the fight ; She drops her arms, to gain the field ; Secures her conqueft by her flight ; And triumphs, when fhe feems to yield. VIII. So, when the Parthian turn'd his fteed, And from the hoftile camp withdrew, With cruel fkill the backward reed He fcnt ; and, as he fled, he flew. SEEģ99 SEEING THE DUKE OF ORMOND'S PICTURE AT SIR GODFREY KNELLER'S.
Page 66 - Till pitying Nature figns the laft releafe, And bids afflicted worth retire to peace. But few there are whom hours like thefe await, Who fet unclouded in the gulphs of Fate. From Lydia's...
Page 74 - Too foon •Convinc'd, fhall yield that fleeting breath, Which play'd fo idly with the darts of death. Some from the ftranded veflel force their way ; Fearful of Fate, they meet it in the fea : Some who efcape the fury of the wave, Sicken on earth, and fink into a grave : In journies or at home, in war or peace, By hardfhips many, many fall by eafe. Each changing feafon does its poifon bring, Rheums chill the winter, agues blaft the fpring; Wet, dry, cold, hot, at the appointed hour, All aft fubfervient...
Page 6 - ... that his father had beaten his grandfather, and his grandfather his great grandfather ; and pointing to his son he said, ' This little fellow will beat me when he has grown to be a man : — it is a constitutional weakness in our family.
Page xvi - France who served under six kings, Francis I., Henry II., Francis II., Charles IX., Henry III., and Henry IV. He distinguished himself at the battles of Dreux, Saint-Denis, Montcontour, and in the famous siege of Rochelle in 1573.

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